8

In Python, when I merge two dictionaries using the update() method, any existing keys will be overwritten.

Is there a way to merge the two dictionaries while keeping the original keys in the merged result?

Update

Say we had the following example:

dict1 = {'bookA': 1, 'bookB': 2, 'bookC': 3}
dict2 = {'bookC': 2, 'bookD': 4, 'bookE': 5}

Can we merge the two dictionaries, such that the result will keep both values for the key bookC?

I'd like dict3 to look like this:

{'bookA': 1, 'bookB': 2, 'bookC': (2,3), 'bookD': 4, 'bookE': 5}
  • 3
    Can you give a sample input/output? – Bahrom Mar 23 '16 at 14:17
  • What exactly do you want to happen to keys that are present in both dicts? – jwodder Mar 23 '16 at 14:18
  • @BAH Thanks, added an example – Simplicity Mar 23 '16 at 14:22
  • 4
    You can't have a dictionary contain two keys of the same value. Keys must be unique. I would question the purpose of the outer code and whether a dictionary is the correct object to store the data you need? – J2C Mar 23 '16 at 14:27
10

If it's alright to keep all values as a list (which I would prefer, it just adds extra headache and logic when your value data types aren't consistent), you can use the below approach for your updated example using a defaultdict

from itertools import chain
from collections import defaultdict

d1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
d2 = {'a': 2, 'b': 3, 'd': 4}

d3 = defaultdict(list)

for k, v in chain(d1.items(), d2.items()):
    d3[k].append(v)

for k, v in d3.items():
    print(k, v)

Prints:

a [1, 2]
d [4]
c [3]
b [2, 3]

You also have the below approach, which I find a little less readable:

d1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
d2 = {'a': 2, 'b': 3,}

d3 = dict((k, [v] + ([d2[k]] if k in d2 else [])) for (k, v) in d1.items())

print(d3)

This wont modify any of the original dictionaries and print:

{'b': [2, 3], 'c': [3], 'a': [1, 2]}
  • Okay, you updated your example, give me a bit to update my answer... – Bahrom Mar 23 '16 at 14:27
  • yes, sure :-) Please take you time, appreciate it! – Simplicity Mar 23 '16 at 14:27
  • 1
    What about the elements in d2 that are not in d1? Will they get to d3 with the above implementation? – EduardoCMB Mar 23 '16 at 14:32
  • @EduardoCMB you're right they won't, I realized that when he updated his question. See edited answer with defaultdict – Bahrom Mar 23 '16 at 14:33
  • 1
    this is the exact thing I just wrote - but the *zip call is superfluous. Also just use d3[k].append(v) – Wayne Werner Mar 23 '16 at 14:33
2
a = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
b = {'a': 10, 'd': 2, 'e': 3}

b.update({key: (a[key], b[key]) for key in set(a.keys()) & set(b.keys())})
b.update({key: a[key] for key in set(a.keys()) - set(b.keys())})

print(b)

Output: {'c': 3, 'd': 2, 'e': 3, 'b': 2, 'a': (1, 10)}

  • 1
    the output should have the key of both a and b – Copperfield Mar 23 '16 at 14:46
  • Thanks @Copperfield, i have corrected it now – Stephen Briney Mar 23 '16 at 14:52
1
a = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
b = {'a': 10, 'd': 2, 'e': 3}

for k in b:
    if k not in a:
        a[k] = b[k]

Update

After the update to the question I would agree with BAH's implementation of using a defaultdict with a list

  • "Can we merge the two dictionaries, such that the result will keep both values for the key bookC?" – SiHa Mar 23 '16 at 14:23
  • Notice the update that he posted. This was answered before that... – J2C Mar 23 '16 at 14:24
  • OK, but it doesn't answer the question as it currently stands. It happens sometimes that a question is edited to invalidate an answer. That answer should be changed or deleted. – SiHa Mar 23 '16 at 14:25

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.