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I'm trying to update some "legacy" code to comply with the latest security updates to MSVC, and am facing some trouble migrating from _vsnprintf to _vsnprintf_s.

In particular, I was calling _vsnprintf with a null buffer and zero for the count/length, getting the result, allocating a buffer of the needed size (return value + 1), and then calling _vsnprintf again with the newly-allocated buffer and known-correct size:

size_t length = _vsntprintf(nullptr, 0, mask, params);
TCHAR *final = new TCHAR [length + 1];
_vsntprintf(final, length + 1, mask, params);

This behavior is documented on MSDN:

If the buffer size specified by count is not sufficiently large to contain the output specified by format and argptr, the return value of vsnprintf is the number of characters that would be written if count were sufficiently large. If the return value is greater than count - 1, the output has been truncated.

I'm trying to do the same with _vsnprintf_s, but its documentation does not contain the same. It instead says

If the storage required to store the data and a terminating null exceeds sizeOfBuffer, the invalid parameter handler is invoked, as described in Parameter Validation, unless count is _TRUNCATE, in which case as much of the string as will fit in buffer is written and -1 returned.

Trying it out anyway with the following:

size_t length = _vsntprintf_s(nullptr, 0, 0, mask, params);

This results in a "length" of zero. If you pass in _TRUNCATE (-1) as the count instead, the following assertion fails:

Expression: buffer != nullptr && buffer_count > 0

I presume it is possible to override _set_invalid_parameter_handler and somehow find out what the length should be, but there has to be an easier way?

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  • This is no C code. Mar 23, 2016 at 22:26
  • @Olaf Sorry, that should have been C++. I was fretting about the security-enhanced-crt tag that I missed that typo. Do you really think that was worth downvoting, though?? Mar 23, 2016 at 22:27
  • In the line size_t length = _vsntprintf(nullptr, 0, 0, mask, params);, did you mean _vsntprintf_s?
    – TriskalJM
    Mar 23, 2016 at 22:28
  • @TriskalJM I fixed that almost immediately, but I wasn't fast enough for you :) Mar 23, 2016 at 22:28
  • 1
    vscprintf? Mar 23, 2016 at 22:37

2 Answers 2

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size_t length = _vscprintf(mask, va_list);
TCHAR *final = new TCHAR [length + 1];
_vsntprintf_s(final, length, _TRUNCATE, mask, va_list);
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  • 2
    That is perfect. A nice, clean solution. _vscprintf should be documented on the the _vsnprintf_s page, imho. Mar 23, 2016 at 23:52
-1

How about rolling your own vsnprintf variant that doesn't "violate the rules" to get the length:

int
printf_size(const char *fmt,int count,va_list ap)
{
    char buf[2000000];
    int len;

    len = vsnprintf_s(buf,sizeof(buf),count,fmt,ap);

    return len;
}

Since the returned will [most likely] be less than sizeof(buf) you should be fine.

Or, do:

int
printf_size(const char *fmt,int count,va_list ap)
{
    char *buf;
    int siz;
    int len;

    for (siz = 2000000;  ;  siz <<= 1) {
        buf = malloc(siz);
        len = vsnprintf_s(buf,siz,count,fmt,ap);
        free(buf);
        if (len < siz)
            break;
    }

    return len;
}

Or, doing a one stop shop function:

int
sprintf_secure(char **buf,const char *fmt,int count,va_list ap)
{
    char *bp;
    int siz;
    int len;

    for (siz = 2000000;  ;  siz <<= 1) {
        bp = malloc(siz);
        len = vsnprintf_s(bp,siz,count,fmt,ap);
        if (len < siz)
            break;
    }

    bp = realloc(bp,len + 1);

    *buf = bp;

    return len;
}
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  • 1
    Thanks for the suggestion, but randomly allocating 4MiB of data each time someone calls my function is kind of overkill. Mar 23, 2016 at 23:51
  • Well, just use the [first] stack version. There's no allocation. With a 2MB buffer [10,000 should be plenty], it shouldn't overflow the maximum stack limit. Or, the sprintf_secure but start with 1000 (or 100)--it's a tuning parameter that can adjusted dynamically by watching the actual length used. BTW, based on your comment, I just assumed that the *cprintf would be unusable for the same reasons, otherwise I probably wouldn't have posted the answer. Mar 24, 2016 at 0:43
  • No, the secure crt functions only replace operations that involve writing to a pre-allocated buffer. A function like vscprintf which returns an integer would not be affected. Mar 24, 2016 at 17:46

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