13

As described here, using SetFileInformationByHandle with FILE_DISPOSITION_INFO allows one to set a file with an open handle to be deleted upon all handles being closed.

However, I am trying to delete a file based on its file index (disk ID) retrieved by FILE_DISPOSITION_INFO and OpenFileById in order to safely delete files/directories in a directory which differ only in case. This is safe to do in my use case, as on an NTFS system, file indexes are persistent until deletion, negating the use of ReplaceFile, which the current codebase handles.

However, when attempting to delete the handle, I get error 87 (ERROR_INVALID_PARAMETER). If I delete using a handle created with CreateFileW, I run into no problems. I can't do this, though, as Windows will not be able to distinguish between two file/folders of the same case, even though NTFS can.

I am also aware that there is an ambiguity with hardlinked files opened with OpenFileById, as hardlinked files share the same disk ID. The issue of hardlinked files can be considered irrelevant for this scenario. I will only be deleting directories by ID, which cannot be hardlinked.

Is there a parameter or setting I am missing in my OpenFileById call? Somehow, in my SetFileInformationByHandle call?

Additional methods I have tried:

  • Calling DuplicateHandle with the OpenFileById handle, providing DELETE for dwDesiredAccess, and using that. Same ERROR_INVALID_PARAMETER result.
  • Using ReOpenFile with the OpenFileById handle, providing DELETE for dwDesiredAccess, and using that. Same ERROR_INVALID_PARAMETER result.
  • Using ReOpenFile with the OpenFileById handle, providing DELETE for dwDesiredAccess, and providing the FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE flag. No error is given, but the file remains after all handles are closed.

Here is a minimal, yet complete, example which reproduces the problem:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <Windows.h>

DWORD getFileID(LPCWSTR path, LARGE_INTEGER *id)
{
    HANDLE h = CreateFileW(path, 0, 0, 0, OPEN_EXISTING,
        FILE_FLAG_OPEN_REPARSE_POINT |
        FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS |
        FILE_FLAG_POSIX_SEMANTICS,
        0);
    if (h == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        return GetLastError();

    BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION info;
    if (!GetFileInformationByHandle(h, &info))
    {
        DWORD err = GetLastError();
        CloseHandle(h);
        return err;
    }
    id->HighPart = info.nFileIndexHigh;
    id->LowPart = info.nFileIndexLow;
    CloseHandle(h);
    return ERROR_SUCCESS;
}

DWORD deleteFileHandle(HANDLE fileHandle)
{
    FILE_DISPOSITION_INFO info;
    info.DeleteFileW = TRUE;
    if (!SetFileInformationByHandle(
        fileHandle, FileDispositionInfo, &info, sizeof(info)))
    {
        return GetLastError();
    }
    return ERROR_SUCCESS;
}

int wmain(DWORD argc, LPWSTR argv[])
{
    if (argc != 3)
    {
        fwprintf(stderr, L"Arguments: <rootpath> <path>\n");
        return 1;
    }

    DWORD err;
    HANDLE rootHandle = CreateFileW(
        argv[1], 0, 0, 0, OPEN_EXISTING,
        FILE_FLAG_OPEN_REPARSE_POINT |
        FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS |
        FILE_FLAG_POSIX_SEMANTICS,
        0);
    if (rootHandle == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        err = GetLastError();
        fwprintf(stderr,
            L"Could not open root directory '%s', error code %d\n",
            argv[1], err);
        return err;
    }

    LARGE_INTEGER fileID;
    err = getFileID(argv[2], &fileID);
    if (err != ERROR_SUCCESS)
    {
        fwprintf(stderr,
            L"Could not get file ID of file/directory '%s', error code %d\n",
            argv[2], err);
        CloseHandle(rootHandle);
        return err;
    }
    fwprintf(stdout,
        L"The file ID of '%s' is %lld\n",
        argv[2], fileID.QuadPart);

    FILE_ID_DESCRIPTOR idStruct;
    idStruct.Type = FileIdType;
    idStruct.FileId = fileID;
    HANDLE fileHandle = OpenFileById(
        rootHandle, &idStruct, DELETE, FILE_SHARE_DELETE, 0,
        FILE_FLAG_OPEN_REPARSE_POINT | FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS);
    if (fileHandle == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        err = GetLastError();
        CloseHandle(rootHandle);
        fwprintf(stderr,
            L"Could not open file by ID %lld, error code %d\n",
            fileID.QuadPart, err);
        return err;
    }

    err = deleteFileHandle(fileHandle);
    if (err != ERROR_SUCCESS)
    {
        fwprintf(stderr,
            L"Could not delete file by ID '%lld', error code %d\n",
            fileID.QuadPart, err);
    }

    CloseHandle(fileHandle);
    struct _stat _tmp;
    fwprintf(stdout,
        L"File was %ssuccessfully deleted\n",
        (_wstat(argv[2], &_tmp) == 0) ? L"not " : L"");
    CloseHandle(rootHandle);
    return err;
}

Any solution must work with Vista and above. Suggestions for code improvement are also welcome.

  • Try using DuplicateHandle on the handle you get from OpenFileById, with dwDesiredAccess set to DELETE. – Harry Johnston Mar 26 '16 at 0:13
  • @HarryJohnston Good idea, unfortunately didn't work. I've edited the question to include what I've tried so far. – Alyssa Haroldsen Mar 27 '16 at 12:55
  • Presumably the system kernel is configured to be case sensitive, or you wouldn't have such files in the first place; I take it using NtCreateFile isn't an option? – Harry Johnston Mar 27 '16 at 22:37
  • 1
    SWAG: As dumb as it sounds, might you not need to include POSIX_SEMANTICS on the OpenFileById call to get a "compatible" handle? Yeah - I know the POSIX_SEMANTICS nominally only has to do with file names...but there are dumber things in the world. @HarryJohnston mentioned the ERROR_INVALID_PARAMETER - maybe internally, it's "grossly" comparing flags. – Clay Apr 1 '16 at 13:40
  • 1
    For the record, the documentation here: File System Behavior Overview (PDF) confirms (section 4.3.2) that you can't set the delete-on-close flag for a handle that was opened by ID. – Harry Johnston Jul 5 '16 at 0:37
1

In order to make FILE_DISPOSITION_INFO work you need to specify the DELETE access in the CreateFile function as reported in https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa365539(v=VS.85).aspx:

You must specify appropriate access flags when creating the file handle for use with SetFileInformationByHandle. For example, if the application is using FILE_DISPOSITION_INFO with the DeleteFile member set to TRUE, the file would need DELETE access requested in the call to the CreateFile function. To see an example of this, see the Example Code section. For more information about file permissions, see File Security and Access Rights. I.e.

//...
  HANDLE hFile = CreateFile( TEXT("tempfile"), 
                             GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE | DELETE,  //Specify DELETE access!
                             0 /* exclusive access */,
                             NULL, 
                             CREATE_ALWAYS,
                             0, 
                             NULL);

But it seems that an handle created with OpenFileById() cannot be used because the function cannot accept the DELETE flag.
From https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa365432(v=vs.85).aspx on OpenFileById() it can be read: dwDesired

Access [in]
The access to the object. Access can be read, write, or both.

Even setting DELETE or GENERIC_ALL the function fails.
If you replace the handle passed to SetFileInformationByHandle with one created with the CreateFile function having the DELETE flag set, as above, it works.

  • CreateFile is not being used to create the handle that FILE_DISPOSITION_INFO is being used on, OpenFileById is. GENERIC_ALL was used for access, which includes delete. Replacing it with GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE | DELETE makes no difference. – Alyssa Haroldsen Mar 25 '16 at 10:21
  • I already know using CreateFile works, as described. This still has the problem of file paths not being unique with CreateFile. Is it possible to delete a file by disk ID in general, or reliably delete two files which differ only in case, if one is a file and the other a directory? – Alyssa Haroldsen Mar 25 '16 at 11:46
  • MS file system is not case sensitive, so in general the answer is no. I have checked what for me is the last chance: using ReOpenFile to reopen the flie created with OpenFileById adding the DELETE flag, but also this solution doesn't work :( – Frankie_C Mar 25 '16 at 12:32
  • The problem is NTFS is case sensitive but Windows is not. Good idea on ReOpenFile, sad it didn't work. FindNextFile and similar methods still see them as separate files, however. – Alyssa Haroldsen Mar 25 '16 at 13:08
  • It seems that OpenFileById is crafted for internetwork files, so have a limited access to the real file. Maybe there is a function to change something on the opened file. Not one of the most used, nor one that I could recall. Maybe you want search in that direction something like ReOpenFile... – Frankie_C Mar 25 '16 at 14:28
1

There's a user mode version of the kernel mode ZwCreateFile called NTCreteFile which, among other things will give you all of the access rights you can't get with OpenFileById (but you can get with CreateFile). It can do everything CreateFile can do and more. For example, it can even create directories.

The good part is, there's an immensely hacky (but entertaining) way of specifying a file ID in the POBJECT_ATTRIBUTES argument as well, so you get the best of all worlds...except that it's an even more awkward API to call than your run-of-the-mill awkward Windows APIs.

There are two versions of the documentation. One at:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb432380(v=vs.85).aspx

and one at:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff556465(v=vs.85).aspx

...which links to the ZwCreateFile documentation at:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff566424(v=vs.85).aspx

The reason I point this out is that the first article omits some of the goodies (like opening files by ID) that are documented in the last article. I have found this to be common and have also found that most of the documented Zwxxx functionality actually does exists in the equivalent, but incompletely documented NTxxx functions. So you gotta hold your mouth just right to get the requisite functionality.

0

Have you looked into FILE_FLAG_POSIX_SEMANTICS? It will allow you to open files that differ only in case using CreateFile.

Edit: I guess I should have read your code first as I see you are using said flag.

  • Doesn't work. Have you tried it yourself? Also fails with invalid names. – Alyssa Haroldsen Apr 4 '16 at 1:17
  • I'm trying your sample right now and I can reproduce the behavior. I guess my question to you now is which part do you want to get working, deleting files that differ only in case or deleting files opened by ID? – Red Bug Apr 4 '16 at 1:36
  • Deleting files opened by ID, one benefit being able to delete files which differ only by case, as well as invalid filenames, such as those that contain :. FILE_FLAG_POSIX_SEMANTICS also does not work as described if the kernel is not currently case insensitive, which is the default. If you can form a code sample which you verify works, that might be useful. – Alyssa Haroldsen Apr 4 '16 at 1:45
0

Assume the files are XXX and xxx and you want to delete XXX.

  1. MoveFile("XXX", "I think it's XXX")
  2. If XXX got renamed, then DeleteFile("I think it's XXX")
  3. Otherwise, DeleteFile("XXX"); MoveFile("I think it's XXX", "xxx")

As to OpenFileById, as you noted, there is a potential ambiguity with a file with multiple names (aka hard links). Allowing DELETE access could cause havoc with this, with an unexpected name being deleted (if it were left to the file system to select which one). I suspect they opted for the simple case of never letting DELETE access be granted.

A similar argument could be made for allowing hard links to directories. Sure, you could do it some of the time correctly, but once you created a cycle, things get a lot tougher...

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