8

I know there's the back-pipe (<|) operator, referenced in several other SO answers. But that doesn't work well when combined with forward pipes (|>), which is common in chaining. However I'm looking for related options. Basically is there any built-in version of the below function definition? Or is this a bad/dangerous practice?

let inline (^%) f = f

let stuff = 
  [1;2;3]
  |> Seq.filter ^% (>) 2
  |> Seq.map ^% fun x -> x.ToString()


// compare to this, which doesn't compile (and would be hard to follow even if it did)
let stuff = 
  [1;2;3]
  |> Seq.filter <| (>) 2
  |> Seq.map <| fun x -> x.ToString()
8

There are some Haskell features, like optional infixing using backticks, and sections, which aren't available in F#. That makes certain constructs a bit more verbose.

Usually, I'd simply write a pipe of functions as the above like this:

let stuff = 
  [1;2;3]
  |> Seq.filter (fun x -> x < 2)
  |> Seq.map string

This is, in my opinion, much more readable. For example, using Seq.filter ^% (>) 2, I'd intuitively read that as meaning 'all values greater than 2', but that's not what it does:

> let inline (^%) f = f;;

val inline ( ^% ) : f:'a -> 'a

> let stuff = 
  [1;2;3]
  |> Seq.filter ^% (>) 2
  |> Seq.map ^% fun x -> x.ToString()
  |> Seq.toList;;

val stuff : string list = ["1"]

If you leave the reader of the code in doubt of what the code does, you've just made everyone less productive. Using Seq.filter (fun x -> x < 2) may look more verbose, but is unambiguous to the reader.

  • Ironically I'd originally written it as fun x -> x < 2 when typing out the example and then thought "nah, someone is going to point out how to shorten it". – Dax Fohl Mar 25 '16 at 13:30
  • Any thoughts on ^% vs <| with regard to blog.ploeh.dk/2016/03/01/ad-hoc-arbitraries-now-with-pipes? I guess they do the same thing in that case so may as well stick with the built-in op. Though ^% would help if it was in a |> chain. – Dax Fohl Mar 25 '16 at 13:32
  • i.e. you could do Gen.elements [4..8] |> Arb.fromGen |> Prop.forAll ^% fun neighborCount -> ... – Dax Fohl Mar 25 '16 at 13:40
  • 3
    @DaxFohl That does look enticing :) Most F#ers (me included), however, are quite conservative when it comes to introducing new operators. Readers of code will need to look it up in order to understand what a new operator does, so the benefit of the operator should be substantially greater than the cost of understanding it. – Mark Seemann Mar 25 '16 at 13:49

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