3

Given this code:

template< class C >
void foo( C const& o ) { o.nosuch(); }

struct Base {};
void foo( Base const& ) {}

struct Derived: Base {};

auto main() -> int
{
    Derived d;
    foo( d );       // !Invokes template.
}

… I want the call to invoke the overload defined for Base, without having to define an overload or template specialization for Derived.

The goal is to be able to apply foo to all kinds of objects, not just Base (and Derived) objects, with a generic implementation for most kinds of objects.

It would also be nice if an answer explained exactly how overload resolution works in this case, versus how it works with a Derived overload defined.


In the code where this problem manifested, foo above is a function template n_items defined as follows:

template< class Type >
auto n_items( Type const& o )
    -> size_t
{ return o.size(); }

template< size_t n >
auto n_items( std::bitset<n> const& o )
    -> size_t
{ return o.count(); }       // Corresponds to std::set<int>::size()

template< class Type, size_t n >
constexpr
auto n_items( Raw_array_of_<n, Type> const& a )
    -> size_t
{ return static_size( a ); }

And the intent is that this should be a catch-all for types that don't define their own n_items overloads.

And for a base and derived class, it should be enough that the base class defines a custom n_items; it would be very redundant to have to define it for every derived class.

10
  • 1
    what are your constraints? Is modifying the template acceptable? Is modifying the Base function acceptable, is it preferable? Is your template really a "catch everything except everything derived from Base? Wish you would clarify some more. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:34
  • @JohannesSchaub-litb: Well, a bit more concrete, the goal is to be able to write n_items( o ) for all kinds of object o, including std::vector (where it invokes size member), std::bitset (where it invokes count, I think it was), raw arrays, and my own string classes, where one is derived from a more general one. The n_items template is specialized for bitset and raw array, and has a generic implementation as a catch-all for types that don't define their own overloads. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:43
  • 1
    If you have a specific return type that does not depend on the argument type, you can also create a struct template<typename R, typename F> struct UserConv { R r; template<typename U> UserConv(U &&u):r(F::call(u)) { } }; which allows you to say struct SizeCall { template<typename T> static size_t call(const T& t) { return t.size(); } }; and use size_t foo(UserConv<size_t, SizeCall> uc) { return uc.r; }. This overload has user-defined conversion cost and is always second-choice against derived-to-base conversion. All it needs is some SFINAE protection against size() not being found. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:48
  • @JohannesSchaub-litb; :) That's ingenious. Heh. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:52
  • 3
    This question is under discussion on meta.
    – Rizier123
    Mar 25, 2016 at 18:15

5 Answers 5

5

How overload resolution works

First we do name lookup and template type deduction. For foo(d), this gives us two options:

  1. foo(Derived const&), with [C = Derived]
  2. foo(Base const&)

These are our viable candidates.

Then we determine which one of the overloads is the best viable candidate. This is done first by looking at conversion sequences. In this case, (1) is an Exact Match whereas (2) involves a derived-to-base conversion which has Conversion rank (see this table). Since that ranks worse, candidate (1) is preferred and is thus deemed the best viable candidate.

How to do what you really want

The simplest way is to simply add a third overload for Derived:

  1. foo(Derived const&)

Here, both (1) and (3) would be equivalent in terms of conversion sequence. But functions that aren't templates are preferred to functions that are templates (think of it as picking the most specific option), so (3) would be selected.

But you don't want to do that. So the options are either: make (1) not work for Derived or make (2) work for Derived too in a way that's preferred.

Disable the general template

We can use SFINAE to simply exclude anything derived from Base:

template <class T, class = std::enable_if_t<!std::is_convertible<T*, Base*>::value>
void foo(T const& ); // new (1)

void foo(Base const& ); // same (2)

Now, (1) is no longer a viable candidate for the match, so (2) is trivally preferred.

Redo the overloads so that the Base is preferred

Taking a tip out of Xeo's book, we can restructure the overloads thusly:

template <int I> struct choice : choice<I + 1> { };
template <> struct choice<10> { };
struct otherwise { otherwise(...) {} };

template <class T> void foo(T const& val) { foo_impl(val, choice<0>{}); }

And now we can prefer those types derived from Base:

template <class T, class = std::enable_if_t<std::is_convertible<T*, Base*>::value>>
void foo_impl(T const& val, choice<0> ); // new (2)

template <class T>
void foo_impl(T const& val, otherwise ); // new (1)

This changes the mechanics of how overload resolution works and is worth going through into the separate cases.

Calling foo(d) means we're calling foo_impl(d, choice<0> ) and gives us two viable candidates:

  1. foo_impl(Derived const&, choice<0> ), with [T = Derived]
  2. foo_impl(Derived const&, otherwise ), with [T = Derived]

Here, the first argument is identical, but for the second argument, the first overload is an Exact Match while the second argument requires a Conversion via a variadic argument. otherwise will always be the word choice as a result, so the first overload is preferred. Exactly what we want.

Calling foo(not_a_base), on the other hand, would only give us one viable candidate:

  1. foo_impl(NotABase const&, otherwise ), with [T = NotABase]

The other one was removed due to the deduction failure. So this is trivially the best viable candidate, and again we get exactly what we want.


For your specific question, I'd write something like:

template <class T>
size_t n_items(T const& cont) { return n_items(cont, choice<0>{}); }

with:

// has count?
template <class T>
auto n_items(T const& cont, choice<0> ) -> decltype(cont.count()) {
    return cont.count();
}

// else, has size?
template <class T>
auto n_items(T const& cont, choice<1> ) -> decltype(cont.size()) {
    return cont.size();
}

// else, use static_size
template <class T>
size_t n_items(T const& cont, otherwise )
    return static_size(cont);
}
5
  • I like the idea of deferring to an implementation function that has a overload-resolution-directing argument. I'm sure this can be simplified much? Thanks. :) Mar 25, 2016 at 16:37
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf What?
    – Barry
    Mar 25, 2016 at 16:43
  • I meant, the levels-of-preference machinery choice<n> isn't really needed here. Mar 25, 2016 at 17:35
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf You never know. IT's just the most general solution. Added an example for your use-case.
    – Barry
    Mar 25, 2016 at 17:45
  • Oh thanks. I didn't think of that! That's good, it would deal with std::bitset automatically if count is given most preferred level, choice<0>. Or I believe so by looking at it. As mentioned I'm not smart today, sorry. Mar 25, 2016 at 18:11
3

Put all the non-template functions in some namespace:

namespace Foo {
    void foo( Base const& ) {}
}

Then define the function template thusly:

template <typename C>
auto foo_aux(C const& c, int) -> decltype(Foo::foo(c)) {
    return Foo::foo(c);}
template <typename C>
void foo_aux(C const& c, ...) {
    c.nosuch();}

template <typename C>
void foo(C const& c) {foo_aux(c, 0);}

Demo. This will call the general overload if and only if none of the non-template overloads match (or are ambiguous).

6
  • Yeah, thanks, but that will only work for types known at the place of definition of the template. That is, then the template only supports a limited, fixed set of types. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:30
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf So you want the template overload to be the "last" choice ever explored?
    – Columbo
    Mar 25, 2016 at 16:31
  • Yes. And right now I'm pretty stupid. Or I feel that way. So I just asked! :) Maybe there isn't even a solution. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:32
  • Oh, mr. SFINAE to the rescue! :) Here I was thinking possibly "no way", and now there's two ways, at the least. Hm. Mar 25, 2016 at 16:40
  • Why an inline namespace in particular?
    – David G
    Mar 25, 2016 at 16:41
3

The main technical problem is that a general function template foo (say), instantiated for Derived argument, is a better match than the overload for Base argument.


Brute force solution (redundancy).

One simple possible solution is to require overloads of all the relevant functions for every class derived from a Base.

However, this breaks the DRY rule, Don't Repeat Yourself.

Needless redundancy in code leads to maintenance problems.


Namespace for SFINAE.

Another possible solution, suggested by Columbo, is to “put all the non-template functions in some [specific single] namespace”, which allows a general function template to use SFINAE to detect if a relevant overload exists.

This solution avoids the redundancy, and as I recall it is the kind of solution used for boost::intrusive_ptr, that client code must specialize the functionality in some specific namespace.

However, since it imposes a restriction on client code it feels not perfect to me.


Extra argument to direct overload resolution.

A third possible solution, suggested by Barry, is to let the base class implementation have an associated overload, or just a differently named function, that has an extra argument that serves to direct the overload resolution, and that is called by by a general function template.

This is technically a solution but IMO it's not clean: the client code invocations don't match the overloads that must be provided.

And so again there is a potential maintenance problem.


Invoking the function template from a simple converting overload.

Johannes Schaub suggested a fourth possible solution, which allows clean, simple client code, namely to let an ordinary overload call the function template, but where that general implementation overload has a formal argument type that

  1. introduces a user defined conversion, which makes this a worse match than direct per-class overloads, and

  2. has a templated constructor that picks up the actual argument type.

Johannes' original ingenious in-comment idea assumed a fixed function result type and exactly one argument. Generalizing that short idea description to arbitrary result type was not entirely trivial for me because that result type can depend on the actual argument, and one tends to first of all try to automate things like that. Likewise, generalizing to arbitrary number of arguments, with the first one acting as a this argument, was not 100% trivial for me. Johannes would no doubt have no problems doing this, and probably in a more neat way than I could do it. Anyway, my code:

#include <functional>
#include <utility>


//-------------------------------------- General machinery:

template< class Impl_func, class Result, class... Args >
class Invoker_of_
{
private:
    std::function< auto(Args...) -> Result > f_;

public:
    auto operator()( Args... args ) const -> Result { return f_( args... ); }

    template< class Type >
    Invoker_of_( Type& o )
        : f_(
            [&]( Args... args )
                -> Result
            { return Impl_func{}.operator()( o, args... ); }
            )
    {}
};


//-------------------------------------- General template 1 (foo):

struct Foo_impl
{
    template< class Type >
    auto operator()( Type& o )
        -> int
    { return o.foomethod(); }
};

auto foo( Invoker_of_<Foo_impl, int> const invoker )
    -> int
{ return invoker(); }


//-------------------------------------- General template 2 (bar):

struct Bar_impl
{
    template< class Type >
    auto operator()( Type& o, int const arg1 )
        -> int
    { return o.barmethod( arg1 ); }
};

auto bar( Invoker_of_<Bar_impl, int, int> const invoker, int const arg1 )
    -> int
{ return invoker( arg1 ); }


//--------------------------------------- Usage examples:

struct Base {};
auto foo( Base const& ) -> int { return 101;}
auto bar( Base const&, int x ) -> int { return x + 2; }

struct Derived: Base {};

struct Other
{
    auto foomethod() -> int { return 201; }
    auto barmethod( int const x ) -> int { return x + 2; }
};


//--------------------------------------- Test driver:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
auto main() -> int
{
    Derived d;
    int const r1 = foo( d );            // OK, invokes non-template overload.
    int const r2 = bar( d, 100 );       // OK, invokes non-template overload.
    cout << r1 << " " << r2 << endl;

    Other o;
    int const r3 = foo( o );            // OK, invokes the general template.
    int const r4 = bar( o, 200 );       // OK, invokes the general template.
    cout << r3 << " " << r4 << endl;
}

I have not attempted to support rvalue reference arguments.

Output:
101 102
201 202
5
  • Is there a way to avoid using std::function? That'll add a lot of [hidden] overhead here...
    – Barry
    Mar 26, 2016 at 12:55
  • @Barry: I'm not sure it adds overhead at all, not to say "a lot". std::function is a very lean beast. But it's possible that there will be overhead, and originally I wrote code that just stored a pointer to the argument, before I realized that that (or at least the way I did it) wouldn't work. The problem is reducing the number arguments, like std::bind. Not sure how to do that without replicating much of std:.function internals? Mar 26, 2016 at 13:11
  • I now suddenly thought it would be easy, then looked at the code, and realized that it would need something like boost::any to store the object pointer, and some type erasure, so that's back to std::function functionality again. Hm. Mar 26, 2016 at 13:19
  • But it can be specialized for the case of a single argument, then for that case storing the result in the invoker object as in Johannes' original comment. It's not sure to be more efficient though. Because it almost guarantees a copying (or at least moving) of the result, while the above stands a better chance of RVO, I think. Mar 26, 2016 at 13:26
  • I guess we're actually just storing a reference to the passed in object, so that's guaranteed to not use dynamic allocation.
    – Barry
    Mar 26, 2016 at 13:27
0

A variation Johannes Schaub's suggestion, which appears to yield the most clean usage, written up as code for the example at the start:

//-------------------------------------- Machinery:

template< class Type >
auto foo_impl( Type& o ) -> int { return o.method(); }

struct Invoker_of_foo_impl
{
    int result;

    template< class Type >
    Invoker_of_foo_impl( Type& o ): result( foo_impl( o ) ) {}
};

auto foo( Invoker_of_foo_impl const invoker ) -> int { return invoker.result; }

//--------------------------------------- Usage:

struct Base {};
auto foo( Base const& ) -> int { return 6*7;}

struct Derived: Base {};

struct Other { auto method() -> int { return 0b101010; } };

auto main() -> int
{
    Derived d;
    foo( d );       // OK, invokes non-template.

    Other o;
    foo( o );       // OK, invokes template
}
3
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf There is a meta post about this Q&A here: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/319747 . I feel like there are 2 things under the discussion right now: 1) Is this a fully standalone answer? 2) If it is a standalone answer should it be edited into the question or posted as an answer. This Q&A seems to be interesting and of good quality. So I think we all don't want to fill it with an unrelated discussion here?
    – Rizier123
    Mar 25, 2016 at 18:27
  • 1
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf: Barry is just following community recommendations; you should not add your answer to your question, you should post it as an answer. Barry made this a community wiki to ensure the answer is not lost, it certain does not belong in your answer post.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Mar 25, 2016 at 22:32
  • @MartijnPieters: The point of a lock down is to prevent history changes while a dispute is ongoing. Not the opposite on both counts. For the record, any answer of mine would be posted as an answer, and I have certainly not presented this as my answer or as an answer at all. Mar 26, 2016 at 2:18
0

I'm not sure I got the problem, but can't you use simply SFINAE and the is_base_of trait?
Using them, catch all functions are automatically excluded when the function resolution takes place for a class that is derived from Base and the best match is the non-template one.
Moreover, such a solution looks to me as far simpler than all the other... That's why I'm pretty sure that I didn't get the problem!! :-)

Anyway, it follows a working example:

#include<type_traits>
#include<iostream>

struct Base {};
auto foo( Base const& ) -> int {return 101;}
auto bar( Base const&, int x ) -> int {return x + 2; }

template<class T, typename = typename std::enable_if<not std::is_base_of<Base, T>::value>::type>
auto foo(T & t) -> int {
    return t.foomethod();
}

template<class T, typename = typename std::enable_if<not std::is_base_of<Base, T>::value>::type>
auto bar(T & t, int i) -> int {
    return t.barmethod(i);
}

struct Derived: Base {};

struct Other
{
    auto foomethod() -> int { return 201; }
    auto barmethod( int const x ) -> int { return x + 2; }
};

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
auto main() -> int
{
    Derived d;
    int const r1 = foo( d );            // Invokes the Base arg overload.
    int const r2 = bar( d, 100 );       // Invokes the Base arg overload.
    cout << r1 << " " << r2 << endl;

    Other o;
    int const r3 = foo( o );            // Invokes the general implementation.
    int const r4 = bar( o, 200 );       // Invokes the general implementation.
    cout << r3 << " " << r4 << endl;
}

Let me know if I've misunderstood the problem, in that case I'm dropping the answer.

3
  • Thanks! But this limits the general implementation to a pre-determined class or set of classes. A more general SFINAE-based solution was suggested by Columbo, but although that allowed arbitrary classes it was IMO not perfect. :) When simple client code is main criterion. It was however possibly more efficient than involving a std::function instance. Mar 26, 2016 at 9:02
  • It actually limits to a subtree of a hierarchy (is_base_of). From the question it seems that you want to treat differently all and only those classes that are derived from Base indeed. What's exactly the problem? I'd like to think once more on that, if you agree, but I need more details. Thank you.
    – skypjack
    Mar 26, 2016 at 9:07
  • Note that this one still works with no changes as long as you continue to extend the hierarchy started from Base, so it is limited to a virtually infinite (well, if it would make sense) set of classes.
    – skypjack
    Mar 26, 2016 at 9:14

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