2

I did a sort function that passing an array as a parameter return a new array with the index positions sorted by the name of the item.

P.E: if the input is ["dog", "cat", "tiger"] the expected output will be [1, 0, 2]

Without Prototype method

let sortIndexes = (a) => {
    var aClone = a.slice(0);
    return a.sort().map(x => aClone.indexOf(x));
}

let animals = ["dog", "cat", "tiger"];
var result = sortIndexes(animals); 
console.log(result) // [1, 0, 2] 

Well, this code works, but I think is better do the same adding an Array Prototype method. And I try it...

With Prototype

Array.prototype.sortIndexes = () => {
    var aClone = this.slice(0); //Console Error in this line
    return this.sort().map(x => aClone.indexOf(x));
}

let animals = ["dog", "cat", "tiger"];
var result = animals.sortIndexes(); 

I expected the same result that without using prototype, but this error console occurs:

Cannot read property 'slice' of undefined

How can do this using Array Prototype?

Thanks!

1
4

That is the beauty of Arrow functions,

Array.prototype.sortIndexes = function(){
    var aClone = this.slice(0); //Console Error in this line
    return this.sort().map(x => aClone.indexOf(x));
}

let animals = ["dog", "cat", "tiger"];
var result = animals.sortIndexes(); 

console.log(result); // [1, 0, 2] 

Arrow function will bind the lexical scope into it automatically. Here in your case the lexical scope is window. So window.slice is undefined. Hence it is throwing error.

And the main rule is that you cannot force the scope of an arrow function with another one by using bind/call/etc.. So we have to be very careful while deciding when to use arrow functions.

10
  • Cannot read property 'slice' of undefined means that the context this is undefined (but not window as you mention). Probably strict mode is enabled. – Dmitri Pavlutin Mar 25 '16 at 18:51
  • 1
    And it's not the problem in lexical scope. It's the context of the function invocation: this. – Dmitri Pavlutin Mar 25 '16 at 18:53
  • Scope and this are different things. – Felix Kling Mar 25 '16 at 18:54
  • @DmitriPavlutin Arrow function decides the this based on which scope it is getting executed. – Rajaprabhu Aravindasamy Mar 25 '16 at 18:55
  • Arrow functions don't decide anything. They simply resolve this lexically. This also means that the scope is determined when / where the function is defined, not where/when it is executed. – Felix Kling Mar 25 '16 at 18:57
1

Arrow functions don't bind this to the element being iterated, instead this simply remains bound to the enclosing scope: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Functions/Arrow_functions

8
  • 1
    Nit: The don't bind this at all, they simply resolve this lexically, like any other variable. – Felix Kling Mar 25 '16 at 18:55
  • @FelixKling this isn't a variable - it is a keyword that is bound to an object reference and that binding cannot be changed (unless a containing function is called with call, apply, bind, forEach, map, etc.). Arrow functions use the lexical binding of this. The binding process for this takes place when a function's Activation Object is created. – Scott Marcus Mar 25 '16 at 19:01
  • Sure. All I am saying is that arrow functions are not binding this in the sense how .bind binds this. "The binding process for this takes place when a function's Activation Object is created." Activation objects don't exist anymore in ES6. this is not bound in arrow functions: ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/…: "A function Environment Record is a declarative Environment Record that is used to represent the top-level scope of a function and, if the function is not an ArrowFunction, provides a this binding. " – Felix Kling Mar 25 '16 at 19:04
  • @FelixKling True, but then again, I didn't say they did bind as in .bind(), but they do actually bind. – Scott Marcus Mar 25 '16 at 19:06
  • 1
    Well, I hope my quote from the spec convinces you otherwise. I agree that this is not resolved exactly like other variables, but it is not bound. The relevant part of the spec is ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/… and ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/… . – Felix Kling Mar 25 '16 at 19:07

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