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I'm doing an assignment where I need to do a multitude of things that require nested if/else. Print the first 50 Fibonacci numbers, but:

  • if the number is a multiple of 3 - print "Cheese"
  • if the number is a multiple of 5 - print "Cake"
  • if the number is a multiple of 7 - print "Factory"
  • if the number is a multiple of 3 & 5 - print "CheeseCake"
  • if the number is a multiple of 3 & 7 - print "CheeseFactory"
  • if the number is a multiple of 5 & 7 - print "CakeFactory"
  • if the number is a multiple of 3 & 5 & 7 - print "CheeseCakeFactory"
  • if the number is a multiple of 2 - print "Blah"

At this point I'm repeating the conditions, and I'm sure there's a cleaner way to do it:

package Assignment1;

public class CheeseCakeFactory_163003984 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long numberOne = 0;
        long numberTwo = 1;
        long sum = 0;
        int counter = 0;

        String word1 = "Cheese";
        String word2 = "Cake";
        String word3 = "Factory";

        while (counter <= 50) {
            sum = numberOne + numberTwo;
            numberOne = numberTwo;
            numberTwo = sum;
            counter++;

            if (sum % 3 == 0) {
                System.out.print(word1 + ", ");
            } else if (sum % 5 == 0) {
                if (sum % 3 == 0) {
                    System.out.print(word1 + word2 + ", ");
                } else if (sum % 3 == 0) {
                    if (sum % 5 == 0) {
                        if (sum % 7 == 0) {
                            System.out.print(word1 + word2 + word3 + ", ");
                        }
                    }
                    if (sum % 7 == 0) {
                        System.out.print(word1 + word2 + word3 + ", ");
                    } else if (sum % 2 == 0) {
                        System.out.print("Blah, ");
                    } else {
                        System.out.print(sum);

                        if (counter % 10 == 0) {
                            System.out.print("\n");
                        } else {
                            System.out.print(", ");
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    I'm not convinced your existing code is correct. If the number is a multiple of 3 and 5 won't it just output "Cheese" instead of "CheeseCake"? In case you are looking for more information about the problem you've been set, it is a variation of what's called "FizzBuzz". – Chris Mar 25 '16 at 21:29
  • According to your requirement, you don't even need an else-if or nested if statements. 3 single if is suffice. – user3437460 Mar 25 '16 at 22:23
2

There is a good reason behind the names "CheeseFactory", "CakeFactory", and "CheeseCakeFactory". It is so that you do not have to repeat your statements.

Let us say you have an array with the first 50 fibonacci-numbers already called numbers.

for(int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
    System.out.print(numbers[i] + ": ");
    if(numbers[i] % 3 == 0) {
        System.out.print("Cheese");
    }
    if(numbers[i] % 5 == 0) {
        System.out.print("Cake");
    }
    if(numbers[i] % 7 == 0) {
        System.out.print("Factory");
    }
    System.out.println(""); //start a new line
}

I have not covered what will happen if it's a multiple of two, since it is ambiguous. What if it's both a multiple of two and three?

  • This answer is wrong ! What if it is divisible by both 5 ad 7? – Pritam Banerjee Mar 25 '16 at 21:30
  • @PritamBanerjee Then you get "CakeFactory" as intended. There is nothing wrong. – Gendarme Mar 25 '16 at 21:31
  • @PritamBanerjee: Both conditions will still be hit. For example, "35" (if we were using non-Fib numbers) would hit this scenario. – Makoto Mar 25 '16 at 21:31
1

The idea here is that you want to build out the statements one at a time instead of all at once. Here I'm going to leverage something known as StringBuilder which will allow us to neatly and concisely build out the string we want.

If we know the sum to be divisible by 3, we add the word we want to the appender.

if (sum % 3 == 0) {
    builder.append(word1);
}

If we know the sum to be divisible by 3 and by 5, we add the words we want to the appender.

if (sum % 3 == 0) {
    builder.append(word1);
}

if(sum % 5 == 0) {
    builder.append(word2);
}

Nothing special needs to happen in terms of other logic; simple if conditions will get you the result you need. If it's not true, the if block isn't executed.

I leave the other forms (including the even number form and actually also printing out the number - hint: if you haven't printed any other words, you may want to print the number) as an exercise for the reader.

  • What do you mean by "there is no chance that you will accidentally enter a case specific to 3 & 7 with "Cake"? – Gendarme Mar 25 '16 at 21:32
  • @Gendarme: I went ahead and removed it outright since it was more confusing than it needed to be and didn't add anything to the answer. – Makoto Mar 25 '16 at 21:35
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I tried your code and it was printing all the time the word Cheese.

I refactored it a little bit to fulfill your requirements ( I hope I understood them :) )

public static void main(String[] args) {
    long numberOne = 0;
    long numberTwo = 1;
    long sum = 0;
    int counter = 0;

    String word1 = "Cheese";
    String word2 = "Cake";
    String word3 = "Factory";
    String word4 = "Blah";


    while (counter <= 50) {
        sum = numberOne + numberTwo;
        numberOne = numberTwo;
        numberTwo = sum;
        counter++;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        if (sum % 2 == 0) {
            sb.append(word4);
        } else {
            if (sum % 3 == 0) sb.append(word1);
            if (sum % 5 == 0) sb.append(word2);
            if (sum % 7 == 0) sb.append(word3);
        }
        if (sum % 2 == 0 || sum % 3 == 0 || sum % 5 == 0 || sum % 7 == 0) {
            sb.append(",");
            System.out.println(String.format("%s %s", sum, sb.toString()));
        }

    }
}

You can then refactor it extracting it to a word factory method and so on

This will print

2 Blah,
3 Cheese,
5 Cake,
8 Blah,
21 CheeseFactory,
34 Blah,
55 Cake,
144 Blah,
610 Blah,
987 CheeseFactory,
2584 Blah,
6765 CheeseCake,
10946 Blah,
46368 Blah,
75025 Cake,
196418 Blah,
317811 Cheese,
832040 Blah,
2178309 CheeseFactory,
3524578 Blah,
9227465 Cake,
14930352 Blah,
63245986 Blah,
102334155 CheeseCakeFactory,
267914296 Blah,
701408733 Cheese,
1134903170 Blah,
4807526976 Blah,
12586269025 Cake,
20365011074 Blah,
32951280099 Cheese,
  • For a number that is divisible by 2 and at least one more of the numbers [3, 5, 7], you would get something like "BlahCheese" (in the case of 2 and 3), and I doubt that is what he wants. "Blah" is really ambiguous and it is not clear what should be done in the case of an even number. – Gendarme Mar 25 '16 at 21:54
  • But then we only get "Blah". But we were supposed to print out "Cheese" if it is divisible by 3, which we aren't. I think we need a multiverse to solve this. – Gendarme Mar 25 '16 at 22:21
  • You are right! In that case I changed the code to make print blash only on multiple of 2 – Filippo di Pisa Mar 25 '16 at 22:24
-1

Instead of nesting for each possible condition, you can check for multiple conditions in the same if statement. For example, to check if a number is a multiple of 3 and 5, you can simply write:

if(sum % 3 == 0 && sum % 5 == 0) // check if this number is a multiple of 3 and 5
    System.out.print("cheesecake");

Using if statements like the example I just gave, you could do all of those things without nesting ifs and just use else ifs or additional, separate ifs.

If the way the statement is written is confusing, you can use parentheses to group the statements together for better readability:

if((sum % 3 == 0) && (sum % 5 == 0))
    System.out.print("cheesecake");

Regardless of which way you write it, the result will be the same, though.

  • You really don't need the && in this scenario. – Makoto Mar 25 '16 at 21:36
  • After seeing the other answers, I agree. – NAMS Mar 25 '16 at 21:47
  • Though I would also say using && or || instead of nesting is preferable, whenever applicable. – NAMS Mar 25 '16 at 21:55

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