I'm trying to extract the exact selection and cursor location from a textarea. As usual, what's easy in most browsers is not in IE.

I'm using this:

var sel=document.selection.createRange();
var temp=sel.duplicate();
temp.moveToElementText(textarea);
temp.setEndPoint("EndToEnd", sel);
selectionEnd = temp.text.length;
selectionStart = selectionEnd - sel.text.length;

Which works 99% of the time. The problem is that TextRange.text doesn't return leading or trailing new line characters. So when the cursor is a couple of blank lines after a paragraph it yields a position at the end of the preceeding paragraph - rather than the actual cursor position.

eg:

the quick brown fox|    <- above code thinks the cursor is here

|    <- when really it's here

The only fix I can think of is to temporarily insert a character before and after the selection, grab the actual selection and then remove those temp characters again. It's a hack but in a quick experiment looks like it will work.

But first I'd like to be sure there's not an easier way.

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I'm adding another answer since my previous one is already getting somewhat epic.

This is what I consider the best version yet: it takes bobince's approach (mentioned in the comments to my first answer) and fixes the two things I didn't like about it, which were first that it relies on TextRanges that stray outside the textarea (thus harming performance), and second the dirtiness of having to pick a giant number for the number of characters to move the range boundary.

function getSelection(el) {
    var start = 0, end = 0, normalizedValue, range,
        textInputRange, len, endRange;

    if (typeof el.selectionStart == "number" && typeof el.selectionEnd == "number") {
        start = el.selectionStart;
        end = el.selectionEnd;
    } else {
        range = document.selection.createRange();

        if (range && range.parentElement() == el) {
            len = el.value.length;
            normalizedValue = el.value.replace(/\r\n/g, "\n");

            // Create a working TextRange that lives only in the input
            textInputRange = el.createTextRange();
            textInputRange.moveToBookmark(range.getBookmark());

            // Check if the start and end of the selection are at the very end
            // of the input, since moveStart/moveEnd doesn't return what we want
            // in those cases
            endRange = el.createTextRange();
            endRange.collapse(false);

            if (textInputRange.compareEndPoints("StartToEnd", endRange) > -1) {
                start = end = len;
            } else {
                start = -textInputRange.moveStart("character", -len);
                start += normalizedValue.slice(0, start).split("\n").length - 1;

                if (textInputRange.compareEndPoints("EndToEnd", endRange) > -1) {
                    end = len;
                } else {
                    end = -textInputRange.moveEnd("character", -len);
                    end += normalizedValue.slice(0, end).split("\n").length - 1;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return {
        start: start,
        end: end
    };
}

var el = document.getElementById("your_textarea");
var sel = getSelection(el);
alert(sel.start + ", " + sel.end);
  • Nice. Like the idea of using the text length instead of really big number on the moveStart/moveEnd. – Brad Robinson Sep 6 '10 at 0:35
  • Ah, I didn't see this one. Result is 20-30ms now, excellent work! – Andy E Oct 20 '10 at 14:46
  • 1
    @Andy: I've written a jQuery plug-in that includes this. Not yet documented and lumped in with a tenuously related project, but working: code.google.com/p/rangy/downloads/… – Tim Down Oct 20 '10 at 14:55
  • ah, so you're the creator of rangy. The project I used your answer in is an IE only project and I'm not working with jQuery, but I'll definitely find use for your plug-in at some point, I'm sure. – Andy E Oct 20 '10 at 15:09
  • The jQuery plug-in containing this has now moved here: code.google.com/p/rangyinputs – Tim Down Apr 22 '11 at 14:34

The move by negative bazillion seems to work perfectly.

Here's what I ended up with:

var sel=document.selection.createRange();
var temp=sel.duplicate();
temp.moveToElementText(textarea);
var basepos=-temp.moveStart('character', -10000000);

this.m_selectionStart = -sel.moveStart('character', -10000000)-basepos;
this.m_selectionEnd = -sel.moveEnd('character', -10000000)-basepos;
this.m_text=textarea.value.replace(/\r\n/gm,"\n");

Thanks bobince - how can I vote up your answer when it's just a comment :(

  • I've looked into this a bit further. See my answer for my conclusions. Two points about what you have there: it will throw an error if you use it on an input instead of a textarea, and also the positions it returns are relative to a piece of text that isn't the actual value in the input: I think the selection position is conceptually an offset within the input's value, which contains \r\n for each line break rather than \n. – Tim Down Sep 3 '10 at 9:50
  • Yes, that's why the function mentioned at stackoverflow.com/questions/1738808#1739088 returns the actual strings, corrected for \r\n, rather than indices into the value; I guess the same will happen here with m_text. – bobince Sep 3 '10 at 9:59
  • Yep. Your example doesn't return the positions though. – Tim Down Sep 3 '10 at 10:37
  • I've posted a new answer that improves on this by removing the need to move the start of the TextRange to the start of the document's body. – Tim Down Sep 5 '10 at 23:34

A jquery plugin to get selection index start and end in text area. The above javascript codes didnt work for IE7 and IE8 and gave very inconsistent results, so I have written this small jquery plugin. Allows to temporarily save start and end index of the selection and hightlight the selection at a later time.

A working example and brief version is here: http://jsfiddle.net/hYuzk/3/

A more details version with comments etc. is here: http://jsfiddle.net/hYuzk/4/

        // Cross browser plugins to set or get selection/caret position in textarea, input fields etc for IE7,IE8,IE9, FF, Chrome, Safari etc 
        $.fn.extend({ 
            // Gets or sets a selection or caret position in textarea, input field etc. 
            // Usage Example: select text from index 2 to 5 --> $('#myTextArea').caretSelection({start: 2, end: 5}); 
            //                get selected text or caret position --> $('#myTextArea').caretSelection(); 
            //                if start and end positions are the same, caret position will be set instead o fmaking a selection 
            caretSelection : function(options) 
            { 
            if(options && !isNaN(options.start) && !isNaN(options.end)) 
            { 
            this.setCaretSelection(options); 
            } 
            else 
            { 
            return this.getCaretSelection(); 
            } 
            }, 
            setCaretSelection : function(options) 
            { 
            var inp = this[0]; 
            if(inp.createTextRange) 
            { 
            var selRange = inp.createTextRange(); 
            selRange.collapse(true); 
            selRange.moveStart('character', options.start); 
            selRange.moveEnd('character',options.end - options.start); 
            selRange.select(); 
            } 
            else if(inp.setSelectionRange) 
            { 
            inp.focus(); 
            inp.setSelectionRange(options.start, options.end); 
            } 
            }, 
            getCaretSelection: function() 
            { 
            var inp = this[0], start = 0, end = 0; 
            if(!isNaN(inp.selectionStart)) 
            { 
            start = inp.selectionStart; 
            end = inp.selectionEnd; 
            } 
            else if( inp.createTextRange ) 
            { 
            var inpTxtLen = inp.value.length, jqueryTxtLen = this.val().length; 
            var inpRange = inp.createTextRange(), collapsedRange = inp.createTextRange(); 

            inpRange.moveToBookmark(document.selection.createRange().getBookmark()); 
            collapsedRange.collapse(false); 

            start = inpRange.compareEndPoints('StartToEnd', collapsedRange) > -1 ? jqueryTxtLen : inpRange.moveStart('character', -inpTxtLen); 
            end = inpRange.compareEndPoints('EndToEnd', collapsedRange) > -1 ? jqueryTxtLen : inpRange.moveEnd('character', -inpTxtLen); 
            } 
            return {start: Math.abs(start), end: Math.abs(end)}; 

            }, 
            // Usage: $('#txtArea').replaceCaretSelection({start: startIndex, end: endIndex, text: 'text to replace with', insPos: 'before|after|select'}) 
            // Options     start: start index of the text to be replaced 
            //               end: end index of the text to be replaced 
            //              text: text to replace the selection with 
            //            insPos: indicates whether to place the caret 'before' or 'after' the replacement text, 'select' will select the replacement text 

            replaceCaretSelection: function(options) 
            { 
            var pos = this.caretSelection(); 
            this.val( this.val().substring(0,pos.start) + options.text + this.val().substring(pos.end) ); 
            if(options.insPos == 'before') 
            { 
            this.caretSelection({start: pos.start, end: pos.start}); 
            } 
            else if( options.insPos == 'after' ) 
            { 
            this.caretSelection({start: pos.start + options.text.length, end: pos.start + options.text.length}); 
            } 
            else if( options.insPos == 'select' ) 
            { 
            this.caretSelection({start: pos.start, end: pos.start + options.text.length}); 
            } 
            } 
        }); 
  • Is "the above javascript codes" a reference to the accepted answer? If so, a comment to the answer itself would be helpful so that I could improve the answer if necessary. Could you give a specific example of its inconsistent results? – Tim Down Dec 6 '12 at 11:44

N.B. Please refer to my other answer for the best solution I can offer. I'm leaving this here for background.

I've come across this problem and written the following that works in all cases. In IE it does use the method you suggested of temporarily inserting a character at the selection boundary, and then uses document.execCommand("undo") to remove the inserted character and prevent the insertion from remaining on the undo stack. I'm pretty sure there's no easier way. Happily, IE 9 will support the selectionStart and selectionEnd properties.

function getSelectionBoundary(el, isStart) {
    var property = isStart ? "selectionStart" : "selectionEnd";
    var originalValue, textInputRange, precedingRange, pos, bookmark;

    if (typeof el[property] == "number") {
        return el[property];
    } else if (document.selection && document.selection.createRange) {
        el.focus();
        var range = document.selection.createRange();

        if (range) {
            range.collapse(!!isStart);

            originalValue = el.value;
            textInputRange = el.createTextRange();
            precedingRange = textInputRange.duplicate();
            pos = 0;

            if (originalValue.indexOf("\r\n") > -1) {
                // Trickier case where input value contains line breaks

                // Insert a character in the text input range and use that as
                // a marker
                range.text = " ";
                bookmark = range.getBookmark();
                textInputRange.moveToBookmark(bookmark);
                precedingRange.setEndPoint("EndToStart", textInputRange);
                pos = precedingRange.text.length - 1;

                // Executing an undo command to delete the character inserted
                // prevents this method adding to the undo stack. This trick
                // came from a user called Trenda on MSDN:
                // http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms534676%28VS.85%29.aspx
                document.execCommand("undo");
            } else {
                // Easier case where input value contains no line breaks
                bookmark = range.getBookmark();
                textInputRange.moveToBookmark(bookmark);
                precedingRange.setEndPoint("EndToStart", textInputRange);
                pos = precedingRange.text.length;
            }
            return pos;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

var el = document.getElementById("your_textarea");
var startPos = getSelectionBoundary(el, true);
var endPos = getSelectionBoundary(el, false);
alert(startPos + ", " + endPos);

UPDATE

Based on bobince's suggested approach in the comments, I've created the following, which seems to work well. Some notes:

  1. bobince's approach is simpler and shorter.
  2. My approach is intrusive: it makes changes to the input's value before reverting those changes, although there is no visible effect of this.
  3. My approach has the advantage of keeping all operations within the input. bobince's approach relies on creating ranges that span from the start of the body to the current selection.
  4. A consequence of 3. is that the performance of bobince's varies with the position of the input within the document whereas mine does not. My simple tests suggest that when the input is close to the start of the document, bobince's approach is significantly faster. When the input is after a significant chunk of HTML, my approach is faster.

function getSelection(el) {
    var start = 0, end = 0, normalizedValue, textInputRange, elStart;
    var range = document.selection.createRange();
    var bigNum = -1e8;

    if (range && range.parentElement() == el) {
        normalizedValue = el.value.replace(/\r\n/g, "\n");

        start = -range.moveStart("character", bigNum);
        end = -range.moveEnd("character", bigNum);

        textInputRange = el.createTextRange();
        range.moveToBookmark(textInputRange.getBookmark());
        elStart = range.moveStart("character", bigNum);

        // Adjust the position to be relative to the start of the input
        start += elStart;
        end += elStart;

        // Correct for line breaks so that offsets are relative to the
        // actual value of the input
        start += normalizedValue.slice(0, start).split("\n").length - 1;
        end += normalizedValue.slice(0, end).split("\n").length - 1;
    }
    return {
        start: start,
        end: end
    };
}

var el = document.getElementById("your_textarea");
var sel = getSelection(el);
alert(sel.start + ", " + sel.end);
  • This seems a very messy workaround! Is there any reason to prefer it to just using the range.moveStart('character', -10000000) method of determining selection boundaries in a textarea? That still has \r\n to fix up, but that's relatively simple in comparison. – bobince Sep 1 '10 at 23:47
  • bobince: erm. I can't remember the problem I thought existed with your suggestion and now can't find one. I'll get back to you. – Tim Down Sep 1 '10 at 23:55
  • bobince: hmm. Looks like you're right. I was sure there was some kind of problem with empty lines with your approach but there doesn't seem to be. – Tim Down Sep 2 '10 at 0:10
  • bobince: I've looked into this a bit further. My conclusions are now in my answer, but to answer your original question, the one reason I can see to favour my approach is that mine is independent of the position of the input within the document, whereas yours is not. If your use your approach on an input at the end of a large HTML document, performance is compromised. – Tim Down Sep 3 '10 at 9:45
  • Interesting, there's a measurable performance difference at the end of the document even though the moveStart method doesn't actually walk over any of those characters? That's highly strange. (Oh, IE...) – bobince Sep 3 '10 at 9:53

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