4

I am trying to use the event system in Unity (the C# way), but I am having problems to implement it.

Most of the examples, show one class, where you define the handler; then you write in the same class, the function that match the signature of the handler, and you write the events as static

public class EventExample : MonoBehaviour
{
    public delegate void ExampleEventHandler();
    public static event ExampleEventHandler OneDayPassed;

    public static void NextTurn()
    {
        // do stuff then send event
        if (OneDayPassed != null)
            OneDayPassed();
    }
}

Then in another class, you subscribe to the events, creating a function that actually do something

public class EntityWatcher: MonoBehaviour
{
    void Start()
    {
        EventExample.OneDayPassed += this.PrepareNextDay;
    }

    public void PrepareNextDay()
    {
        // Do other stuff that happen after the day is done

    }
}

So far no problems, but I am not sure how do I design this, so any GameObject of a particular type, will subscribe to this event. For example, if you have a staff category of GO, that is working 8 to 6, and you instantiate them at runtime; should I subscribe in the main class of this category, or should I create a script that I attach to the Game Object prefab, that subscribe to the event?

The objective is that all the staff members that should do a 8 to 6 shift at the sport center, know when the "day is done" event fire up, but I don't want to subscribe every single prefab that I instantiate.

From my understanding, I should attach a script with the needed code on the prefab, but I can't find a practical example that show if that is in fact the way to do it.

  • Hi Newb'z. This is all totally and completely wrong. These day syou just use UnityEvent. You do not use and realistically cannot use the "old fashioned" events from a decade ago. – Fattie Mar 27 '16 at 15:49
  • So it is better to rely on something used only in Unity, Vs something that is part of the language itself? – user393267 Mar 27 '16 at 23:34
  • Hi @newbiez. Yes, that's absolutely correct. – Fattie Mar 28 '16 at 0:02
  • You should understand that wen you are using Unity, you are using an extreme distortion of conventional programming. It is not an OO system, it is ECS. Consider this recent question from myself, stackoverflow.com/questions/36251078/… unity has these "interfaces" that are actually completely haywire and the opposite of "interface" in c#. – Fattie Mar 28 '16 at 0:05
18

You must use UnityEvent.

    public UnityEvent whoa;

It could not be easier. Make a script BigScript.cs

using UnityEngine;
using System.Collections;
using UnityEngine.Events;

public class BigScript:MonoBehaviour
    {
    [Header("Here's a cool event! Drag anything here!")]
    public UnityEvent whoa;
    }

Put it on a game object. Now look at it in the Inspector. Cool right?

Simply drag your other scripts to there, to make something happen, when "whoa" happens.

enter image description here

It's that simple. To call the event in BigScript, it is just

public class BigScript:MonoBehaviour
    {
    [Header("Here's a cool event! Drag anything here!")]
    public UnityEvent whoa;

    private void YourFunction()
      {
      whoa.Invoke();
      }

(if you prefer, if (whoa!=null) whoa.Invoke(); )


In rare cases you may need to add a listener via code.

(I mean, rather than simply dragging it in the Editor.)

Nowadays this is simple. Be aware of out of date example code on the internet.

whoa.AddListener(ScreenMaybeChanged);

To be clear: never do that - simply drag to connect. I only mention it for completeness.


That's all there is to it.

Be aware of out of date example code regarding this topic on the internet.*


The above shows how to connect simple functions that have no argument.

If you do need an argument:

An example where the function has ONE FLOAT argument:

Simply add THIS CODE at the top of the file:

[System.Serializable] public class _UnityEventFloat:UnityEvent<float> {}

then you are all set.

...
using UnityEngine.Events;

// magic line of code...
[System.Serializable] public class _UnityEventFloat:UnityEvent<float> {}

public class SomeThingHappens : MonoBehaviour
{
    public _UnityEventFloat changedLength;
    public _UnityEventFloat changedHeight;

    ... and then ... 

    void ProcessValues(float v)
    {
        ....
        if (changedLength != null) changedLength.Invoke(1.4455f);
    }
}

When you drag from your other function to the Editor slot on this function:

Be absolutely sure to use the ones up the top - "Dynamic float".

enter image description here

Confusingly your functions will ALSO be listed in the lower "Static Parameters" section!

That is a huge gotchya in Unity!

  • Thanks Joe, this is vastly simplier than using the standard C# Delegates and Events system. My only worry is that once you get used to this, you will loose the standard C# way to do things...I do write code for both Unity applications and pure C# applications, so my "to-go" approach is usually to use whatever C# offer natively. I assume that Unity approach is as performant as using regular Delegates and Events in C#; thanks! – user393267 Mar 28 '16 at 0:31
  • 1
    hi newbiez, conventional c# events do not work in the Unity context since it is an ECS system. For that reason Unity created the (outstanding) UnityEvent system. Regarding the fact that you work on multiple systems - no big deal. You have to be expert at both. That's life! – Fattie Mar 28 '16 at 3:02
  • I see; I did implement my system using regular C# code with Events and Delegates, but this is much easier, and comform to the ECS model, like everything else in Unity. Indeed you must be a jack of all trade :) – user393267 Mar 28 '16 at 6:17
  • Question: What I would like to understand is how to specify the values for the arguments in the Inspector when using a derived UnityEvent type (e.g, public class CustomEvent:UnityEvent<string,float>). When using this, the Inspector understand the signature (string,float), allows selection of the function to invoke within the target script, but does not allow you to specify values for these arguments within the Inspector. This ability is available when binding a stock UnityEvent to a function that takes a string argument. Perhaps it is not possible without custom editing code? – Randy Larson May 11 at 19:40
  • @RandyLarson , indeed, I think very simply "they don't do that". Just as you say, it only works in the simple "one string" case. I'm too lazy to open Unity on the weekend, but maybe something like this helps ?? answers.unity.com/answers/1230225/view.html cheers! – Fattie May 11 at 19:43
1

Don't worry too much about the number of subscribers if you are only talking about a few dozens. Yes, once you get into the hundreds or thousands it might be a good idea to optimize this, but even then. First rule of optimization: don't optimize.

So: just have every instance subscribe to the event and be done with it.

  • Agree; since I didn't use Unity before for this kind of things, I wanted to be sure that I am doing it in the "right" way. I do not have too many events, but I have hundreds of subscribed entities to these events, since all the entities in my application, depend from when certain cycles start and end (theya re all instances thou, so that should clear with Unity easily). – user393267 Mar 28 '16 at 0:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy