11

I have a list of numpy vectors (1-D arrays) or scalars (i.e. just numbers). All the vectors have the same length but I don't know what that is. I need to vstack all the elements to create one matrix (2-D array) in such a way that the scalars are treated as vectors having the scalar at each position.

Example is the best description:

Case 1:

>>> np.vstack([np.array([1, 2, 3]), np.array([3, 2, 1])])
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [3, 2, 1]])

Case 2:

>>> np.vstack([1, 2])
array([[1],
       [2]])

Case 3:

>>> np.vstack([np.array([1, 2, 3]), 0, np.array([3, 2, 1])])
np.array([[1, 2, 3],
          [0, 0, 0],
          [3, 2, 1]])

Cases 1 and 2 work out-of-the-box. In case 3, however, it does not as vstack needs all the elements to be arrays of the same length.

Is there some nice way (preferably one-liner) of achieving this?

3 Answers 3

14

You could create broadcast object, and call np.column_stack on that:

In [175]: np.column_stack(np.broadcast([1, 2, 3], 0, [3, 2, 1]))
Out[175]: 
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [0, 0, 0],
       [3, 2, 1]])

Alternatively, you could ask NumPy to literally broadcast the items to compatibly-shaped arrays:

In [158]: np.broadcast_arrays([1, 2, 3], [3, 2, 1], 0)
Out[158]: [array([1, 2, 3]), array([3, 2, 1]), array([0, 0, 0])]

and then call vstack or row_stack on that:

In [176]: np.row_stack(np.broadcast_arrays([1, 2, 3], 0, [3, 2, 1]))
Out[176]: 
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [0, 0, 0],
       [3, 2, 1]])

Of these two options (using np.broadcast or np.broadcast_arrays), np.broadcast is quicker since you don't actually need to instantiate the broadcasted sub-arrays.

One limitation of np.broadcast, however, is that it can accept at most 32 arguments. In that case, use np.broadcast_arrays.

3
  • Yes, that is exactly what I'm looking for. Just a small question (just out of curiosity): in the first case (with broadcast), why does column_stack put the elements in rows instead of columns? If I had no scalars and omitted the broadcast the vectors would be in columns instead of rows. It's like the broadcast transposes the result.
    – zegkljan
    Mar 27, 2016 at 21:47
  • 1
    @zegkljan: np.broadcast returns an iterator. That iterator returns tuples consisting of values from each of the original arrays (or scalars) that would be grouped together for element-wise operations. Look at what list(np.broadcast(np.arange(24).reshape(2,3,4), np.arange(3*4).reshape(3,4))) returns. It is a 24-element list of 2-tuples. It is not showing the individual broadcasted arrays like np.broadcast_arrays does. It is showing the element-wise pairings. Given the nature of the iterator returned by np.broadcast, np.column_stack is required to form the desired array.
    – unutbu
    Mar 28, 2016 at 0:06
  • np.array(list(np.broadcast(....)) is faster than np.vstack(np.broadcast(...)). It doesn't have to pass the arrays through np.atleast_2d.
    – hpaulj
    Mar 28, 2016 at 4:04
1

The problem here is to fill the gap between the readable python world, and the efficient numpy world.

Experimentally, python is paradoxically often better that numpy for this task. With l=[ randint(10) if n%2 else randint(0,10,100) for n in range(32)] :

In [11]: %timeit array([x if type(x) is ndarray else [x]*100 for x in l])
1000 loops, best of 3: 655 µs per loop

In [12]: %timeit column_stack(broadcast(*l))
100 loops, best of 3: 3.77 ms per loop

Furthermore broadcast is limited to 32 elements.

0
-1

Not a one liner, but you can fill an empty array with your scalar.

>>> a = np.empty(4, dtype=int )
>>> a.fill(2)
>>> print(a)
[2 2 2 2]

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