Hey quick question anyone knows if there is any performance difference between these 2 codes (PHP-7):

public function isActive() : bool
{
    if ($cond1) {
        if ($cond2) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

and

public function isActive() : bool
{
    if ($cond1 && $cond2) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

(Yes I know the variables are not defined, question is about the if statements not the variables)

I ask this question because I'm focusing on readability of my code, but at same time maintaining my performance the best I can.

Even if it is just a very tiny performance difference (e.g 0.000000001%) I still like to know the answer.

closed as primarily opinion-based by user557846, Sean, Adam Cameron, user4151918, Rob Apr 4 '16 at 13:55

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Logically they are the same. Why not setup a test environment and test to see? – Pitchinnate Mar 28 '16 at 1:52
  • 4
    There may be a difference, but it would be utterly insignificant. In other words, it would have no effect on your performance, what-so-ever. You should write your code so it is readable and makes sense. A simpler way to do it is: return $cond1 && $cond2; – Sverri M. Olsen Mar 28 '16 at 1:54
  • 3
    bench mark it your self, micro-optimisation is not a good fit for a stack overflow question – user557846 Mar 28 '16 at 1:56
  • They are the same. I usually use the second one because it makes your code short and look nice. – rhavendc Mar 28 '16 at 3:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know @tom starts his answer by saying "it doesn't matter", but this cannot be stressed enough, so I'm going to elaborate further in a separate answer.

@piotr-gajdowski: just don't worry about this sort of thing. If one needs to loop thousands of times to see a difference, this implies it's a case of micro-optimisation. The differences here will be lost in the background noise of any other consideration going on at the same time, for example:

  • what else the server is doing at the time;
  • network latency variation;
  • how busy external dependencies like DBs are at the time.

So... it simply doesn't matter.

Always go for the code that you find clearest, and - more importantly - that other people will find the clearest. This generally means the simplest.

For your specific situation, given you given us "fake" code, it's impossible even to say given your example what that might be:

  • how complex are the two conditions?
  • Are they really just single variables?
  • Do the variables have explanatory names?
  • If they conditions are actually boolean expressions rather than variables... consider putting them in well-named intermediary variables.

These are the things you should be worried about.

Write your code as clearly as possible (this doesn't not necessarily mean as tersely as possible, btw). If at some point you find you have performance issues, then (and only then) start looking for optimisations. But don't start looking for this sort of optimisation. Start looking for things that will make a difference.

I think the best thing you could do with your code example would be to submit the real world code to Code Review, and then we can help you come up with the clearest approach to coding it. That's the question you should be asking here.

Well, here's an "answer" but really when it comes down to it, it doesn't matter.

Method 1

<?php
$temp = 10000;
function isActive() {
    if ($cond1) {
        if ($cond2) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
} 
$start = microtime(true);
while ($temp) {
  isActive();
  $temp--;
}
echo $time_elapsed_secs = microtime(true) - $start;
?> 

Output: 0.17261600494385

Method 2

<?php
$temp = 10000;
function isActive() {
    if ($cond1 && $cond2) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
} 
$start = microtime(true);
while ($temp) {
  isActive();
  $temp--;
}
echo $time_elapsed_secs = microtime(true) - $start;
?> 

Output: 0.16869401931763

Note: I got a range of outputs some higher and lower than each other. The average you got may be different times and is so neglectable that you really don't have to worry, choose the method that you like best.

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