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I've successfully opened a binary file (jpg) and copied it's contents to another new file. However, when I print out the contents of the original file, printf loses the first two HEX values.

For example, example.jpg when opened in a HEX editor starts with "FFD8FFE0" When I copy this to the new file, it is copied correctly. However, when I print the contents onto the terminal in the IDE it prints "D8FFE0", where do the first two "FF" go?

I tried to adjust the fseek(pfile1, 0, SEEK_SET) to fseek(pfile1, -1, SEEK_SET) but this outputs all zeros, so I am not sure what could be the issue.

I also tried a do...while loop instead of the for loop, hoping I could get the original iteration to get FF, but that did not work.

I also tried manipulating the bugger in ch = fread(...), to buffer-1, but that did not work.

Lastly, I tried using malloc on the char buffer like so: unsigned char *buffer= malloc(6000000*sizeof(unsigned char)); But that did not help fetch the first two digits either.

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
     FILE * pFile1 = fopen("example.jpg", "rb"); 
     unsigned char buffer[6000000] = {0}; 
     FILE * pFile2 = fopen("outputExample.jpg", "wb");
     char ch;
     unsigned long fileLen;
     unsigned long counter;

     fseek(pFile1, 0, SEEK_END);
     fileLen=ftell(pFile1);      // get the exact size of the pic
     fseek(pFile1, 0, SEEK_SET);

     for(counter=0; counter<fileLen; counter++) 
        {
          fputc(fgetc(pFile1),pFile2); 

          ch = fread(buffer, sizeof(char), 6000000, pFile1);
          printf("%02x", buffer[counter]);
        }


     fclose(pFile1);
     fclose(pFile2);

     return 0;
}
  • 4
    There must be a reason you're slamming up to 5.7MB of data into that buffer from pFile1, printing one byte of it in hex, then throwing the rest away. I just can't think of what that reason would be. – WhozCraig Mar 28 '16 at 4:44
  • Where are you accounting for the character read with fgetc(pFile1)? Does it ever find its way into buffer? Might that be a one fact to consider in solving the mystery of where FF went? – David C. Rankin Mar 28 '16 at 5:19
  • I think I have a possible answer to your 'it prints "D8FFE0", where do the first two "FF" go?"'question. I ran into this when modifying my own example code to print the initial characters. You may be confused by byteswapping, ie. you're expecting 'FFD8' but your code is giving you 'D8FF' so it looks like 'FF' is 'missing' but it's really a problem of correct interpretation of the data. – cdlane Mar 28 '16 at 5:52
1

If we rework your code to be a simple file copy utility, does that give you a starting point for what custom thing you really want to do:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

#define BUFFER_SIZE (1024 * 1024)

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
    FILE *pFile1 = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    FILE *pFile2 = fopen(argv[2], "wb");

    unsigned char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
    long fileLen;

    fseek(pFile1, 0, SEEK_END);
    fileLen = ftell(pFile1); // get the exact size of the pic
    fseek(pFile1, 0, SEEK_SET);

    for (size_t counter = 0; counter < fileLen;) 
    {
        size_t bytes_read = fread(buffer, sizeof(char), BUFFER_SIZE, pFile1);
        size_t bytes_written = fwrite(buffer, sizeof(char), bytes_read, pFile2);

        assert(bytes_read == bytes_written);

        if (counter == 0)
        {
            printf("%2x\n", (((unsigned short) buffer[1]) << 8) | buffer[0]);
        }

        counter += bytes_written;
    }

    fclose(pFile2);
    fclose(pFile1);

    return 0;
}

I've augmented this simple file copy program to output the first two bytes in hex:

> od -x original.jpg | head -1
0000000      d8ff    e0ff    1000    464a    4649    0100    0001    0100
> ./a.out original.jpg duplicate.jpg
d8ff
> 

One of the file signatures for JPEG is FFD8FFE0 so we're seeing (little endian) swapped bytes.

  • That's worth something for actually validating the return of fread and fwrite, simple to do but so often omitted. – David C. Rankin Mar 28 '16 at 5:28
0

First you read a byte from pFile1 with fgetc() so the file pointer has moved one step ahead, then you do a fread() so the first byte will never land in buffer

 for(counter=0; counter<fileLen; counter++) 
    {
      fputc(fgetc(pFile1),pFile2); 

      ch = fread(buffer, sizeof(char), 6000000, pFile1);
      printf("%02x", buffer[counter]);
    }

I find it a bit difficult to understand why you do the fread in the manner you do. If you really want to display the byte you just read then just assign the return value from fgetc to a variable and print it out .

      for (counter=0; counter<fileLen; ++counter)
      {
        int ch = fgetc(pfile1);
        printf("%02X", ch );
        int written = fputc(ch,pfile2);
        if (written != EOF) 
        { 
          buffer[counter]=ch; 
        }
        else // some error handling
      }

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