50

I am using python and plotly to product interactive html report. This post gives a nice framework.

If I produce the plot(via plotly) online, and insert the url into the html file, it works but refreshing the charts takes a long time. I wonder if I could produce the chart offline and have it embedded in the html report, so that loading speed is not a problem.

I find plot offline would generate a html for the chart, but I don't know how to embed it in another html. Anyone could help?

28

Option 1: Use plotly's offline functionality in your Jupyter Notebook (I suppose you are using a Jupyter Notebook from the link you are providing). You can simply save the whole notebook as a HTML file. When I do this, the only external reference is to JQuery; plotly.js will be inlined in the HTML source.

Option 2: The best way is probably to code directly against plotly's JavaScript library. Documentation for this can be found here: https://plot.ly/javascript/

Update: Calling an internal function has never been a good idea. I recommend to use the approach given by @Fermin Silva. In newer versions, there now is also a dedicated function for this: plotly.io.to_html (see https://plotly.com/python-api-reference/generated/plotly.io.to_html.html)

Hacky Option 3 (original version for reference only): If you really want to continue using Python, you can use some hack to extract the HTML it generates. You need some recent version of plotly (I tested it with plotly.__version__ == '1.9.6'). Now, you can use an internal function to get the generated HTML:

from plotly.offline.offline import _plot_html
data_or_figure = [{"x": [1, 2, 3], "y": [3, 1, 6]}]
plot_html, plotdivid, width, height = _plot_html(
    data_or_figure, False, "", True, '100%', 525)
print(plot_html)

You can simply paste the output somewhere in the body of your HTML document. Just make sure that you include a reference to plotly in the head:

<script src="https://cdn.plot.ly/plotly-latest.min.js"></script>

Alternatively, you can also reference the exact plotly version you used to generate the HTML or inline the JavaScript source (which removes any external dependencies; be aware of the legal aspects however).

You end up with some HTML code like this:

<html>
<head>
  <script src="https://cdn.plot.ly/plotly-latest.min.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
  <!-- Output from the Python script above: -->
  <div id="7979e646-13e6-4f44-8d32-d8effc3816df" style="height: 525; width: 100%;" class="plotly-graph-div"></div><script type="text/javascript">window.PLOTLYENV=window.PLOTLYENV || {};window.PLOTLYENV.BASE_URL="https://plot.ly";Plotly.newPlot("7979e646-13e6-4f44-8d32-d8effc3816df", [{"x": [1, 2, 3], "y": [3, 1, 6]}], {}, {"showLink": false, "linkText": ""})</script>
</body>
</html>

Note: The underscore at the beginning of the function's name suggests that _plot_html is not meant to be called from external code. So it is likely that this code will break with future versions of plotly.

| improve this answer | |
  • In my Sankey diagram test, _plot_html generates less code than plotly.offline.plot(data, filename='file.html'), the later seems to contain default values in JSON. The js api allows one to update the graph more efficiently after creation, the json definition are the same as in python, this indeed is a good choice.; – Ben Apr 6 '19 at 2:18
  • @JPW How does this work now given _plot_html is deprecated? – GKS Mar 29 at 17:02
133

There is a better alternative as of right now, that is to do offline plotting into a div, rather than a full html. This solution does not involve any hacks.

If you call:

plotly.offline.plot(data, filename='file.html')

It creates a file named file.html and opens it up in your web browser. However, if you do:

plotly.offline.plot(data, include_plotlyjs=False, output_type='div')

the call will return a string with only the div required to create the data, for example:

<div id="82072c0d-ba8d-4e86-b000-0892be065ca8" style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="plotly-graph-div"></div>
<script type="text/javascript">window.PLOTLYENV=window.PLOTLYENV || {};window.PLOTLYENV.BASE_URL="https://plot.ly";Plotly.newPlot("82072c0d-ba8d-4e86-b000-0892be065ca8", 
[{"y": ..bunch of data..., "x": ..lots of data.., {"showlegend": true, "title": "the title", "xaxis": {"zeroline": true, "showline": true}, 
"yaxis": {"zeroline": true, "showline": true, "range": [0, 22.63852380952382]}}, {"linkText": "Export to plot.ly", "showLink": true})</script>

Notice how its just a tiny portion of an html that you are supposed to embed in a bigger page. For that I use a standard template engine like Jinga2.

With this you can create one html page with several charts arranged the way you want, and even return it as a server response to an ajax call, pretty sweet.

Update:

Remember that you'll need to include the plotly js file for all these charts to work.

You could include

<script src="https://cdn.plot.ly/plotly-latest.min.js"></script> 

just before putting the div you got. If you put this js at the bottom of the page, the charts won't work.

| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    Thanks. Your answer here contained the crucial line, "You could include <script src="https://cdn.plot.ly/plotly-latest.min.js"></script> just before putting the div you got.", which solved the issue for me. – 0_0 Jan 24 '17 at 15:30
  • @0_0 you are right. I didnt include that part here because that was already mentioned in the above answer. I'll add it here as well for future reference – Fermin Silva Jan 24 '17 at 15:38
  • 3
    i wonder why they keep these simple things as easter eggs in there documentation....plus 100 to this answer!! :) – NoobEditor Mar 1 '17 at 5:22
  • @Fermin Silva Can you please give an example of how to return/use that returned value in an ajax call? – Mahdi Ghelichi Mar 23 '19 at 1:23
  • @MahdiGhelichi you need to eval the code you get back from the ajax, because simply appending the html to the DOM won't work. Take a look at subinsb.com/how-to-execute-javascript-in-ajax-response (and also keep in mind that blindly executing js from a server might be a bit unsecure) – Fermin Silva Mar 26 '19 at 16:33
8

In addition to the other answers, another possible solution is to use to_json() on the plotly figure.

No need for custom JSON serializer or use of internal solutions.

import plotly

# create a simple plot
bar = plotly.graph_objs.Bar(x=['giraffes', 'orangutans', 'monkeys'], 
                            y=[20, 14, 23])
layout = plotly.graph_objs.Layout()
fig = plotly.graph_objs.Figure([bar], layout)

# convert it to JSON
fig_json = fig.to_json()

# a simple HTML template
template = """<html>
<head>
    <script src="https://cdn.plot.ly/plotly-latest.min.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id='divPlotly'></div>
    <script>
        var plotly_data = {}
        Plotly.react('divPlotly', plotly_data.data, plotly_data.layout);
    </script>
</body>

</html>"""

# write the JSON to the HTML template
with open('new_plot.html', 'w') as f:
    f.write(template.format(fig_json))
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you pass multiple plots into the html template this way? – aerijman Feb 3 at 19:29
  • 1
    @Maximiliano Peters It did. thank you. I did not pay attention to the way the variables are passed into the string with the format from python. Yours is the cleanest and only answer that worked fast for me! – aerijman Feb 3 at 20:06
7

I wasn't able to get any of these solutions to work. My goal was to generate plots in one notebook and publish them in another, so persisting the plot HTML wasn't as important for me as simply having some method for serializing the plot to disk to be rebuilt somewhere else.

The solution I came up with is to serialize the fig object to JSON, and then use plotly's "json chart schema" to build the plot from JSON. This demo is all python, but it should be trivial to build a plot in HTML using this JSON-serialization strategy and invoking the plotly javascript library directly, if that's what you need.

import numpy as np
import json
from plotly.utils import PlotlyJSONEncoder
from plotly.offline import download_plotlyjs, init_notebook_mode, iplot
import plotly.graph_objs as go
init_notebook_mode()

def plotlyfig2json(fig, fpath=None):
    """
    Serialize a plotly figure object to JSON so it can be persisted to disk.
    Figures persisted as JSON can be rebuilt using the plotly JSON chart API:

    http://help.plot.ly/json-chart-schema/

    If `fpath` is provided, JSON is written to file.

    Modified from https://github.com/nteract/nteract/issues/1229
    """

    redata = json.loads(json.dumps(fig.data, cls=PlotlyJSONEncoder))
    relayout = json.loads(json.dumps(fig.layout, cls=PlotlyJSONEncoder))

    fig_json=json.dumps({'data': redata,'layout': relayout})

    if fpath:
        with open(fpath, 'wb') as f:
            f.write(fig_json)
    else:
        return fig_json

def plotlyfromjson(fpath):
    """Render a plotly figure from a json file"""
    with open(fpath, 'r') as f:
        v = json.loads(f.read())

    fig = go.Figure(data=v['data'], layout=v['layout'])
    iplot(fig, show_link=False)

## Minimial demo ##

n = 1000
trace = go.Scatter(
    x = np.random.randn(n),
    y = np.random.randn(n),
    mode = 'markers')

fig = go.Figure(data=[trace])
#iplot(fig)
plotlyfig2json(fig, 'myfile.json')
plotlyfromjson('myfile.json')

EDIT: Per discussion on the associated github issue, this is probably the current best approach.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Wayne I don't think that's correct. OP specified they are seeking to embed an interactive chart, whereas the static image export functionality is by definition not interactive (i.e. the image is "static"). – David Marx Jun 4 '19 at 19:29
1

To improvise the below code you could just call, to_plotly_json() for ex:,

def plotlyfig2json(fig, fpath=None):
    """
    Serialize a plotly figure object to JSON so it can be persisted to disk.
    Figures persisted as JSON can be rebuilt using the plotly JSON chart API:

    http://help.plot.ly/json-chart-schema/

    If `fpath` is provided, JSON is written to file.

    Modified from https://github.com/nteract/nteract/issues/1229
    """

    redata = json.loads(json.dumps(fig.data, cls=PlotlyJSONEncoder))
    relayout = json.loads(json.dumps(fig.layout, cls=PlotlyJSONEncoder))

    fig_json=json.dumps({'data': redata,'layout': relayout})

    if fpath:
        with open(fpath, 'wb') as f:
            f.write(fig_json)
    else:
        return fig_json


--------------------------------------------
Simple way:

fig = go.Figure(data=['data'], layout=['layout'])
fig.to_plotly_json()    

| improve this answer | |
  • "To improvise" or did you mean "to improve code from this answer"? – barbsan Jul 15 '19 at 12:46
1

You can also use an iframe according to an answer to the question how to embed html into ipython output?

plotly.offline.plot(fig, filename='figure.html',validate=False)
from IPython.display import IFrame
IFrame(src='./figure.html', width=1000, height=600)
| improve this answer | |
0

I have recently needed to export Plotly Chart to HTML files.

Here is the simple proper way to do it in 2019.

import plotly.offline    
plot(figure, "file.html")
| improve this answer | |
0

Easiest way is to use pio from plotly

import plotly.io as pio
pio.write_html(fig, file='Name.html', auto_open=True)

I have used it a ton of lots to store my graphs before important meetings

| improve this answer | |

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