7

http://ideone.com/UtVzxw

struct base
{
    base() { throw std::exception(); }
};

struct derived : public base
{
    derived() try : base()  { }

    catch (std::exception& e)
    {
        std::cout << "exception handled" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    derived a; // My app crashes.
    return 0;
}

Shoun't my app write "exception handled" and continue running?

The only solution I've found is to surround the construction of "a" in a try/catch block. But If I do that, what's the point of having the try / catch in the constructor at the first place? I'm guessing maybe it's use is to clean up member variables that may have been allocated? since the destructor is not called?

The following works, but handles the exception 2 times.

struct base
{
    base() { throw std::exception(); }
};

struct derived : public base
{
    derived() try : base() { }

    catch(std::exception& e)
    {
      std::cout << "exception 1" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    // This works fine.
    try {
       derived a;
    }
    catch(std::exception& e)
    {
      std::cout << "exception 2" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

I'm just trying to ask myself why I shouldn't simply dodge the try / catch syntax for the constructor and write this:

struct base
{
    base() { throw std::exception(); }
};

struct derived : public base
{
    derived() : base() { }
};

int main()
{
    // This works fine.
    try {
       derived a;
    }
    catch(std::exception& e)
    {
      std::cout << "exception handled" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
9

function-try-block in the constructor doesn't prevent the exception from being thrown. Here's an excerpt from C++ standard draft N4140, [except.handle]:

14 If a return statement appears in a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor, the program is ill-formed.

15 The currently handled exception is rethrown if control reaches the end of a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor or destructor. Otherwise, ...

The reason for this is that if base class or any member constructor throws an exception, then the construction of the whole object fails, and there's no way to fix it, so the exception has to be thrown.

There's a GOTW on this, and the bottomline is

Constructor function-try-block handlers have only one purpose -- to translate an exception. (And maybe to do logging or some other side effects.) They are not useful for any other purpose.

So, yes, your last code sample is perfectly fine.

  • So let's say you are google that have the policy of not using exceptions, and you found a cool library, but the class you want to inherit from throws (only in the constructor, doesn't anywhere else). If you inherit from it, every person using the derived class has to use the try/ catch everytime. What would you do in that case? Seems like the only answer is: use another library, only due to the constructor... – Gam Mar 29 '16 at 1:29
  • @Phantom or don't inherit from it, make a pointer to it a member and initialize it in constructor body. But I believe that in google they won't allow you to use that library anyway. – Anton Savin Mar 29 '16 at 1:49
4

Wrapping a try/catch around a superclass's constructor lets you trap exceptions that get thrown in the superclass's constructor; however the exception gets automatically rethrown when the catch block ends, and the exception continues to propagate.

After all, the superclass did not get constructed. It threw an exception. So you can't really continue on your merry way, in the subclass's constructor, and then end up with a constructed subclass, but with a superclass that did not get constructed. That makes no sense.

From http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/function-try-block:

The primary purpose of function-try-blocks is to log or modify, and then rethrow the exceptions thrown from the member initializer list in a constructor. They are rarely used with destructors or with regular functions.

This is really the primary value-added of function-try blocks: a convenient place to log "hey, this function threw an exception", that encompasses the entire function, a single place to log this kind of a thing, but without affecting ordinary exception handling.

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