177

How can I pass in multiple parameters to Get methods in an MVC 6 controller. For example I want to be able to have something like the following.

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class PersonController : Controller
{
    public string Get(int id)
    {
    }

    public string Get(string firstName, string lastName)
    {

    }

    public string Get(string firstName, string lastName, string address)
    {

    }
}

So I can query like.

api/person?id=1
api/person?firstName=john&lastName=doe
api/person?firstName=john&lastName=doe&address=streetA

14 Answers 14

155

You also can use this:

// GET api/user/firstname/lastname/address
[HttpGet("{firstName}/{lastName}/{address}")]
public string GetQuery(string id, string firstName, string lastName, string address)
{
    return $"{firstName}:{lastName}:{address}";
}

Note: Please refer to the answers from metalheart and Mark Hughes for a possibly better approach.

9
  • 29
    Until you need to get everyone with the same last name :) Dec 18, 2017 at 14:40
  • 32
    That's a really bad way to design API routes... Not RESTful at all. Jun 14, 2019 at 14:29
  • 18
    The above approach looks very cumbersome, don't get why it has so many upvotes. Jul 25, 2019 at 11:05
  • 1
    @ThomasLevesque What did you mean by it no being RESTful? Sep 10, 2019 at 18:55
  • 4
    @BrunoSantos it doesn't follow the principles of REST. URIs are supposed to uniquely identify resources. This is not the case here (there might be multiple persons with the same first and last name, and an address can certainly not be considered an identifier) Sep 10, 2019 at 20:11
100

Why not using just one controller action?

public string Get(int? id, string firstName, string lastName, string address)
{
   if (id.HasValue)
      GetById(id);
   else if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(address))
      GetByName(firstName, lastName);
   else
      GetByNameAddress(firstName, lastName, address);
}

Another option is to use attribute routing, but then you'd need to have a different URL format:

//api/person/byId?id=1
[HttpGet("byId")] 
public string Get(int id)
{
}

//api/person/byName?firstName=a&lastName=b
[HttpGet("byName")]
public string Get(string firstName, string lastName, string address)
{
}
2
  • 1
    Yes, I solve it now using just one action taking in all attributes that I want to be able to search out a Person on. Like a general search. I would prefer though if there where a way to have overloaded actions in a controller but that might not be the case.
    – mstrand
    Mar 30, 2016 at 7:43
  • 3
    this does not work with .net core 2.0, since no valid url template is actually generated.
    – ZZZ
    May 6, 2018 at 7:55
69

To parse the search parameters from the URL, you need to annotate the controller method parameters with [FromQuery], for example:

[Route("api/person")]
public class PersonController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet]
    public string GetById([FromQuery]int id)
    {

    }

    [HttpGet]
    public string GetByName([FromQuery]string firstName, [FromQuery]string lastName)
    {

    }

    [HttpGet]
    public string GetByNameAndAddress([FromQuery]string firstName, [FromQuery]string lastName, [FromQuery]string address)
    {

    }
}
4
  • 9
    why would you need this? parameter binding from the query string happens by default...
    – metalheart
    Mar 30, 2016 at 6:28
  • 1
    I have tried both but overloading as I try to do fails with or without [FromQuery]
    – mstrand
    Mar 30, 2016 at 7:14
  • 2
    @mstrand I've updated - give that a go, see the extra [HttpGet] annotations, the different method names, and the specific route in [Route] - the routes should be fully explicit now which eliminates a few possible problems. Mar 30, 2016 at 8:42
  • 1
    @metalheart without [FromQuery] sometimes the first param value comes as the RouteName Dec 26, 2020 at 11:12
47

I would suggest to use a separate dto object as an argument:

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class PersonController : Controller
{
    public string Get([FromQuery] GetPersonQueryObject request)
    {
        // Your code goes here
    }
}

public class GetPersonQueryObject 
{
    public int? Id { get; set; }
    public string Firstname { get; set; }
    public string Lastname { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
}

Dotnet will map the fields to your object.

This will make it a lot easier to pass through your parameters and will result in much clearer code.

4
  • and how to pass values in link?
    – Arie
    Dec 3, 2020 at 22:33
  • 2
    What do mean with that? You can provide the values as query parameters like /api/controller?firstname={firstname}&lastname={lastname}
    – Sebastian
    Dec 4, 2020 at 12:52
  • Good and Simple one :) Feb 11, 2021 at 22:14
  • Your solution should have a checked sing. It's simple and does exactly what was requested.
    – ZecosMAX
    May 15, 2022 at 19:01
16

I think the easiest way is to simply use AttributeRouting.

[Route("api/YOURCONTROLLER/{paramOne}/{paramTwo}")]
    public string Get(int paramOne, int paramTwo)
    {
        return "The [Route] with multiple params worked";
    }
2
  • Can I use preferred reference type? That is, int paramOne, string paramTwo
    – k4s
    May 31, 2019 at 16:22
  • Use [Route("api/YOURCONTROLLER/{paramOne}/{paramTwo?}")] if you want your second parameter to be optional
    – Anytoe
    Jul 3, 2019 at 11:41
14

Simplest way,

Controller:

[HttpGet("empId={empId}&startDate={startDate}&endDate={endDate}")]
 public IEnumerable<Validate> Get(int empId, string startDate, string endDate){}

Postman Request:

{router}/empId=1&startDate=2020-20-20&endDate=2020-20-20

Learning point: Request exact pattern will be accepted by the Controller.

14

To call get with multiple parameter in web api core

  [ApiController]
    [Route("[controller]")]
    public class testController : Controller
    {
    
      [HttpGet]
        [Route("testaction/{id:int}/{startdate}/{enddate}")]
        public IEnumerable<classname> test_action(int id, string startdate, string enddate)
        {

            return List_classobject;
        }
    
    }

In web browser
https://Yourdomain/test/testaction/3/2010-09-30/2012-05-01
2
  • I can't believe such answers receive so many upvotes. Do you really build your api in such way? Aug 8, 2021 at 16:51
  • 3
    @OlegIvanov Care to share your answer? Or contribute anything useful? Feb 24, 2022 at 13:44
11

Methods should be like this:

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class PersonsController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet("{id}")]
    public Person Get(int id)

    [HttpGet]
    public Person[] Get([FromQuery] string firstName, [FromQuery] string lastName, [FromQuery] string address)
}

Take note that second method returns an array of objects and controller name is in plurar (Persons not Person).

So if you want to get resource by id it will be:

api/persons/1

if you want to take objects by some search criteria like first name and etc, you can do search like this:

api/persons?firstName=Name&...

And moving forward if you want to take that person orders (for example), it should be like this:

api/persons/1/orders?skip=0&take=20

And method in the same controller:

    [HttpGet("{personId}/orders")]
    public Orders[] Get(int personId, int skip, int take, etc..)
4

You can simply do the following:

    [HttpGet]
    public async Task<IActionResult> GetAsync()
    {
        string queryString = Request.QueryString.ToString().ToLower();

        return Ok(await DoMagic.GetAuthorizationTokenAsync(new Uri($"https://someurl.com/token-endpoint{queryString}")));
    }

If you need to access each element separately, simply refer to Request.Query.

1
  • This is good when you have a growing and long list of filters and sort criteria and you want to keep the your endpoint simple and offload the validation and parsing of query to another class or service.
    – RedRose
    May 2, 2022 at 17:57
4

this is worked for me

[HttpGet("{data}/{whereList}")]
    public JsonResult GetFieldsData([FromQuery]  string data, [FromQuery]  string whereList)
3

To add some more detail about the overloading that you asked about in your comment after another answer, here is a summary. The comments in the ApiController show which action will be called with each GET query:

public class ValuesController : ApiController
{
    // EXPLANATION: See the view for the buttons which call these WebApi actions. For WebApi controllers, 
    //          there can only be one action for a given HTTP verb (GET, POST, etc) which has the same method signature, (even if the param names differ) so
    //          you can't have Get(string height) and Get(string width), but you can have Get(int height) and Get(string width).
    //          It isn't a particularly good idea to do that, but it is true. The key names in the query string must match the
    //          parameter names in the action, and the match is NOT case sensitive. This demo app allows you to test each of these
    //          rules, as follows:
    // 
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with no parameters (/api/values) then the Get() action will be called.
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with a height parameter (/api/values?height=5) then the Get(int height) action will be called.
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with a width parameter (/api/values?width=8) then the Get(string width) action will be called.
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with height and width parameters (/api/values?height=3&width=7) then the 
    //          Get(string height, string width) action will be called.
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with a depth parameter (/api/values?depth=2) then the Get() action will be called
    //          and the depth parameter will be obtained from Request.GetQueryNameValuePairs().
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with height and depth parameters (/api/values?height=4&depth=5) then the Get(int height) 
    //          action will be called, and the depth parameter would need to be obtained from Request.GetQueryNameValuePairs().
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with width and depth parameters (/api/values?width=3&depth=5) then the Get(string width) 
    //          action will be called, and the depth parameter would need to be obtained from Request.GetQueryNameValuePairs().
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with height, width and depth parameters (/api/values?height=7&width=2&depth=9) then the 
    //          Get(string height, string width) action will be called, and the depth parameter would need to be obtained from 
    //          Request.GetQueryNameValuePairs().
    // When you send an HTTP GET request with a width parameter, but with the first letter of the parameter capitalized (/api/values?Width=8) 
    //          then the Get(string width) action will be called because the case does NOT matter.
    // NOTE: If you were to uncomment the Get(string height) action below, then you would get an error about there already being  
    //          a member named Get with the same parameter types. The same goes for Get(int id).
    //
    // ANOTHER NOTE: Using the nullable operator (e.g. string? paramName) you can make optional parameters. It would work better to
    //          demonstrate this in another ApiController, since using nullable params and having a lot of signatures is a recipe
    //          for confusion.

    // GET api/values
    public IEnumerable<string> Get()
    {
        return Request.GetQueryNameValuePairs().Select(pair => "Get() => " + pair.Key + ": " + pair.Value);
        //return new string[] { "value1", "value2" };
    }

    //// GET api/values/5
    //public IEnumerable<string> Get(int id)
    //{
    //    return new string[] { "Get(height) => height: " + id };
    //}

    // GET api/values?height=5
    public IEnumerable<string> Get(int height) // int id)
    {
        return new string[] { "Get(height) => height: " + height };
    }

    // GET api/values?height=3
    public IEnumerable<string> Get(string height)
    {
        return new string[] { "Get(height) => height: " + height };
    }

    //// GET api/values?width=3
    //public IEnumerable<string> Get(string width)
    //{
    //    return new string[] { "Get(width) => width: " + width };
    //}

    // GET api/values?height=4&width=3
    public IEnumerable<string> Get(string height, string width)
    {
        return new string[] { "Get(height, width) => height: " + height + ", width: " + width };
    }
}

You would only need a single route for this, in case you wondered:

    config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
        name: "DefaultApi",
        routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
        defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
    );

and you could test it all with this MVC view, or something simlar. Yes, I know you aren't supposed to mix JavaScript with markup and I'm not using bootstrap like you would normally, but this is for demo purposes only.

<div class="jumbotron">
    <h1>Multiple parameters test</h1>
    <p class="lead">Click a link below, which will send an HTTP GET request with parameters to a WebAPI controller.</p>
</div>
<script language="javascript">
    function passNothing() {
        $.get("/api/values", function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passHeight(height) {
        $.get("/api/values?height=" + height, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passWidth(width) {
        $.get("/api/values?width=" + width, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passHeightAndWidth(height, width) {
        $.get("/api/values?height=" + height + "&width=" + width, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passDepth(depth) {
        $.get("/api/values?depth=" + depth, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passHeightAndDepth(height, depth) {
        $.get("/api/values?height=" + height + "&depth=" + depth, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passWidthAndDepth(width, depth) {
        $.get("/api/values?width=" + width + "&depth=" + depth, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passHeightWidthAndDepth(height, width, depth) {
        $.get("/api/values?height=" + height + "&width=" + width + "&depth=" + depth, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }

    function passWidthWithPascalCase(width) {
        $.get("/api/values?Width=" + width, function (data) { alert(data); });
    }
</script>
<div class="row">
    <button class="btn" onclick="passNothing();">Pass Nothing</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passHeight(5);">Pass Height of 5</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passWidth(8);">Pass Width of 8</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passHeightAndWidth(3, 7);">Pass Height of 3 and Width of 7</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passDepth(2);">Pass Depth of 2</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passHeightAndDepth(4, 5);">Pass Height of 4 and Depth of 5</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passWidthAndDepth(3, 5);">Pass Width of 3 and Depth of 5</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passHeightWidthAndDepth(7, 2, 9);">Pass Height of 7, Width of 2 and Depth of 9</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passHeightWidthAndDepth(7, 2, 9);">Pass Height of 7, Width of 2 and Depth of 9</button>
    <button class="btn" onclick="passWidthWithPascalCase(8);">Pass Width of 8, but with Pascal case</button>
</div>
0
    public HttpResponseMessage Get(int id,string numb)
    {

        using (MarketEntities entities = new MarketEntities())
        {
          var ent=  entities.Api_For_Test.FirstOrDefault(e => e.ID == id && e.IDNO.ToString()== numb);
            if (ent != null)
            {
                return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, ent);
            }
            else
            {
                return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, "Applicant with ID " + id.ToString() + " not found in the system");
            }
        }
    }
0

If you let me, I want to answer for myself (I'm using .NET 5 + React)

Controller:

namespace MyProject.Controllers
{
    [Route("[controller]")]
    public class ExampleController : Controller
    {
        public string Get(string param1, string param2, string param3)
        {
            //your code here
        }
    }
}

JS (React):

fetch(`example?param1=${val1}&param2=${val2}&param3=${val3}`)
0

Optionally You can use this method...(React Js Client ) adding a string "empty" with url..

var tmpName = this.props.name; var tmpRegNo = this.props.rno;
    if (this.props.name === "")
    {
        tmpName = "empty";
    }
    if (this.props.rno === "")
    {
        tmpRegNo = "empty";
    }
    const response = await fetch('student?Name=' + tmpName + '&RegNo=' + tmpRegNo);//url to Controlloer Student

Asp.Net Core Controller part

[HttpGet]
    public string Get(string Name,string RegNo)
    {
        if(Name=="empty")
        {
            
            Name = string.Empty;
        }
        if(RegNo == "empty")
        {
            
            RegNo = string.Empty;
        }
1
  • 1
    What will happen if a student really has the name "empty"? Magic strings are problematic. Dec 27, 2022 at 6:54

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