3

I'm using Unity in with C#. I have an interface I call IConnectionStringLoader, which have two derived interfaces.

public interface IConnectionStringLoader
{
    string Get();
    void Write();
}

public interface IDbConnectionStringLoader : IConnectionStringLoader
{
}

public interface IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader : IConnectionStringLoader
{
}

It has only one implementation:

public class ConnectionStringLoader : IDbConnectionStringLoader, IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader
{
    private readonly string _connectionStringName;

    public ConnectionStringLoader(string connectionStringName)
    {
        _connectionStringName = connectionStringName;
    }

    public string Get()
    {
        var cs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings[_connectionStringName];
        if (cs != null)
        {
            return cs.ConnectionString;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public void Write()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_connectionStringName);
    }
}

My registration looks like this:

container.RegisterType<IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>(new InjectionConstructor("MetaConnection"));
container.RegisterType<IDbConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>(new InjectionConstructor("DbConnection"));

The point of the interfaces is that I can inject the different interfaces in my classes and get the correct connectionstring for each implementation. But the problem is that whatever registration is done last will overwrite the previous one.

var foo = _container.Resolve<IDbConnectionStringLoader>();
var bar = _container.Resolve<IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader>();
foo.Write();
bar.Write();

Output is:

DbConnection 
DbConnection

If I invert the order of the registration the output will be MetaConnection twice. So my conclusion so far is that the last registration overwrites the previous one. However, if I change the implementation to a derived class it works:

public class SomeOtherConnectionStringLoader : ConnectionStringLoader
{
    public ConnectionStringLoaderImpl(string connectionStringName) : base(connectionStringName)
    {
    }
}

And change the registrations:

container.RegisterType<IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>(new InjectionConstructor("MetaConnection"));
container.RegisterType<IDbConnectionStringLoader, SomeOtherConnectionStringLoader >(new InjectionConstructor("DbConnection"));

Now everything works, but I don't understand why. I've tried different lifetimemanagers, but with the same result. I thought Unity would try to create an instance of ConnectionStringLoader with the "correct" injectionparameter based on the interface, but there's seems to be some other logic at play here.

Any suggestions why the registrations overwrite each other?

  • How are you calling Write although it is not part of the interface? – Yacoub Massad Mar 29 '16 at 13:20
  • Good find @YacoubMassad. I added it after I pasted the code here just to create a simple test. It's not really part of the logic, other than to prove that the wrong injection has been injected. I will edit my question. Thank you for noticing. – smoksnes Mar 29 '16 at 13:25
1

Honestly speaking, the way you are using the interfaces looks strange to me because there are two interfaces implemented only by the same class. I would find more natural to follow the next approach using registration names:

// If it is a loader the Write method makes no sense (IConnectionStringRepository?)
public interface IConnectionStringLoader
{
    string Get();
    void Write();
}

public class ConnectionStringLoader : IConnectionStringLoader
{
    private readonly string _connectionStringName;

    public ConnectionStringLoader(string connectionStringName)
    {
        _connectionStringName = connectionStringName;
    }

    public string Get()
    {
        var cs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings[_connectionStringName];
        if (cs != null)
        {
            return cs.ConnectionString;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public void Write()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_connectionStringName);
    }
}

Registrations:

container.RegisterType<IConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>("Database", new InjectionConstructor("MetaConnection"));
container.RegisterType<IConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>("Metadata", new InjectionConstructor("DbConnection"));

Resolutions:

var foo = _container.Resolve<IConnectionStringLoader>("Database");
var bar = _container.Resolve<IConnectionStringLoader>("Metadata");
foo.Write();
bar.Write();
| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, I considered that approach as well. But then my implementation needs to know the registration name, which is why I tried to use different interfaces instead. I thought that you should try to avoid using registration names if possible because. Or am I wrong? – smoksnes Mar 31 '16 at 10:46
  • We normally inject everything in the constructor so we do all the work at registration time. Using the container inside the classes is normally considered a kind of anti-patter (search for ServiceLocator anti-pattern). With that in mind the problem is located always in container registrations where you must specify the name to be resolved when resolving a constructor dependency (it is similar to the InjectionConstructor) – Ignacio Soler Garcia Mar 31 '16 at 13:16
0

I'm not familiar with Unity. But it seems they are mapping to same instance. So you should change lifetime of ConnectionStringLoader (Per dependency).

If you will not share instance, why do you put all things in one class ? ConnectionStringLoader Methods = IDbConnectionStringLoader methods + IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader methods.

When you resolve IDbConnectionStringLoader it will not use IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader methods which is already in instance (vice versa it's true).

Crating two different derived class is better at this point:

Abstract class:

public abstract class ConnectionStringLoader : IConnectionStringLoader
{
    private readonly string _connectionStringName;

    public ConnectionStringLoader(string connectionStringName)
    {
        _connectionStringName = connectionStringName;
    }

    public string Get()
    {
        var cs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings[_connectionStringName];
        if (cs != null)
        {
            return cs.ConnectionString;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public void Write()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_connectionStringName);
    }
}

Derived Classes:

public sealed class DbConnectionStringLoader : ConnectionStringLoader, IDbConnectionStringLoader
{
    public DbConnectionStringLoader(string connectionStringName):base(connectionStringName)
    {

    }
    //Implement methods here just belongs to IDbConnectionStringLoader
}

public sealed class MetaDataConnectionStringLoader : ConnectionStringLoader, IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader
{
    public MetaDataConnectionStringLoader(string connectionStringName):base(connectionStringName)
    {

    }
    //Implement methods here just belongs to IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, it seems that they are mapping to the same instance, even if I use TransientLifetimeManager. Creating two implementations may be the only way to solve it, but I would like to avoid it since the implementations doesn't do anything. They have no specific implementations that is different from ConnectionStringLoader. – smoksnes Mar 29 '16 at 14:42
  • I don't think they're mapping to same instances. It does call the ConnectionStringLoader ctor twice, but with same Injection parameter value i.e. in this case "DbConnection" – AksharRoop Mar 31 '16 at 8:09
0

Surprisingly it does call ConnectionStringLoader ctor twice, but with same injection member. If you look at container.Registrations, there are indeed two registrations so it is not override one with other. I did look at implementation of RegisterType, but didn't get my head around it.

One alternative is to name your registrations, not sure if it fits into your overall unity bootstrap strategy.

container.RegisterType<IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>("bar", new InjectionConstructor("MetaConnection"));
container.RegisterType<IDbConnectionStringLoader, ConnectionStringLoader>("foo", new InjectionConstructor("DbConnection"));

var foo = container.Resolve<IDbConnectionStringLoader>("foo");
var bar = container.Resolve<IMetaDataConnectionStringLoader>("bar");
| improve this answer | |

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