111

How can I sort an IEnumerable<string> alphabetically. Is this possible?

Edit: How would I write an in-place solution?

4 Answers 4

172

The same way you'd sort any other enumerable:

var result = myEnumerable.OrderBy(s => s);

or

var result = from s in myEnumerable
             orderby s
             select s;

or (ignoring case)

var result = myEnumerable.OrderBy(s => s,
                                  StringComparer.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);

Note that, as is usual with LINQ, this creates a new IEnumerable<T> which, when enumerated, returns the elements of the original IEnumerable<T> in sorted order. It does not sort the IEnumerable<T> in-place.


An IEnumerable<T> is read-only, that is, you can only retrieve the elements from it, but cannot modify it directly. If you want to sort a collection of strings in-place, you need to sort the original collection which implements IEnumerable<string>, or turn an IEnumerable<string> into a sortable collection first:

List<string> myList = myEnumerable.ToList();
myList.Sort();

Based on your comment:

_components = (from c in xml.Descendants("component")
               let value = (string)c
               orderby value
               select value
              )
              .Distinct()
              .ToList();

or

_components = xml.Descendants("component")
                 .Select(c => (string)c)
                 .Distinct()
                 .OrderBy(v => v)
                 .ToList();

or (if you want to later add more items to the list and keep it sorted)

_components = xml.Descendants("component")
                 .Select(c => (string)c)
                 .Distinct()
                 .ToList();

_components.Add("foo");
_components.Sort();
5
  • or myEnumerable.OrderByDescending(s => s).
    – Grozz
    Sep 2, 2010 at 19:55
  • So, _components = _components.OrderBy(s => s); would be fine?
    – CatZilla
    Sep 2, 2010 at 19:59
  • @CatZilla: That should work, but may not be the best way to solve your actual problem. What is _components, where do you get it from, how do you use it?
    – dtb
    Sep 2, 2010 at 20:03
  • 1
    @dtb: Oh, _components is populated from an XML file precisely this way: _components = (from c in xml.Descendants("component") select c.Value.ToString()).Distinct().ToList(); And I need to sort it.
    – CatZilla
    Sep 2, 2010 at 20:07
  • 2
    OrderBy returns IOrderedEnumerable<T>. IOrderedEnumerable<T> derives from IEnumerable<T> so it can be used like IEnumerable<T>, but it extends the type, allowing for example, for the use of ThenBy. Sep 2, 2010 at 20:11
14

It is impossible, but it isn't.

Basically, any sort method is going to copy your IEnumerable into a List, sort the List and then return to you the sorted list, which is an IEnumerable as well as an IList.

This means you lose the "continue infinitely" property of an IEnumerable, but then you couldn't sort one like that anyway.

1
  • 7
    Right on. IEnumerable's purpose is to present you with a handle to a series that you can iterate, beginning to end, by continuing to ask for the "next" item. This means that an IEnumerable can be partially iterated before all the contents are known; you don't have to know when you have gone through them all until you have. Sorting (like many things Linq lets you do) requires knowledge of the entire series as an ordered list; the item that would appear first in a sorted series may be the last one returned by a series, and you won't know that unless you know what all the items are.
    – KeithS
    Sep 2, 2010 at 20:18
8
myEnumerable = myEnumerable.OrderBy(s => s);
2

We can't always do it in-place, but we detect when it's possible:

IEnumerable<T> SortInPlaceIfCan(IEnumerable<T> src, IComparer<T> cmp)
{
  List<T> listToSort = (src is List<T>) ? (List<T>)src : new List<T>(src);
  listToSort.Sort(cmp);
  return listToSort;
}
IEnumerable<T> SortInPlaceIfCan(IEnumerable<T> src, Comparison<T> cmp)
{
  return SortInPlaceIfCan(src, new FuncComparer<T>(cmp));
}
IEnumerable<T> SortInPlaceIfCan(IEnumerable<T> src)
{
  return SortInPlaceIfCan(src, Comparer<T>.Default);
}

This uses the following handy struct:

internal struct FuncComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
  private readonly Comparison<T> _cmp;
  public FuncComparer(Comparison<T> cmp)
  {
      _cmp = cmp;
  }
  public int Compare(T x, T y)
  {
      return _cmp(x, y);
  }
}
8
  • I'm not sure if I'd recommend this. If you have an IEnumerable<T> but don't know the actual type that implements, you probably shouldn't be modifying it. Btw, Array.FunctorComparer<T> is internal.
    – dtb
    Sep 2, 2010 at 20:56
  • On modifying what we have, I took that to be implied in the question looking for in-place; that it implies it. It's a reason to have "InPlaceInCan" in the method name; method names can be even more upfront about risks than the best documentation ;) Yeah, Array.FunctorComparer<T> is internal, but it's trivial. I put it in because it's the best way I could think of in an example for "your functor comparer you have in your go-to set of helper classes".
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 2, 2010 at 21:22
  • @dtb on second thoughts, changed to use my own (took a look at Array.FunctorComparer again and I prefer mine anyway!)
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 2, 2010 at 22:08
  • Smart idea and naming! But why the double casting anti pattern in listToSort = (src is List<T>) ? (List<T>)src : new List<T>(src);? What about having it like listToSort = (src as List<T>); if (null == listToSort) listToSort = new List<T>(src); Oct 17, 2013 at 7:51
  • 1
    @JeroenWiertPluimers there's always the issue with example code too; maybe I just didn't bother because the above is slightly shorter and I wanted to concentrate on the matter in hand, but it is good to discourage bad habits even in examples.
    – Jon Hanna
    Oct 17, 2013 at 11:57

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