19

I have this code snippet:

Alert alert = 
        new Alert(AlertType.WARNING, 
            "The format for dates is year.month.day. " +
            "For example, today is " + todayToString() + ".",
             ButtonType.OK, 
             ButtonType.CANCEL);
alert.setTitle("Date format warning");
Optional<ButtonType> result = alert.showAndWait();

if (result.get() == ButtonType.OK) {
    formatGotIt = true;
}

Above, I request two buttons titled "Yes" and "No." However, I wish to change them both.

31

You can define your own button types. In this example the buttons' text is foo and bar:

ButtonType foo = new ButtonType("foo", ButtonBar.ButtonData.OK_DONE);
ButtonType bar = new ButtonType("bar", ButtonBar.ButtonData.CANCEL_CLOSE);
Alert alert = new Alert(AlertType.WARNING,
        "The format for dates is year.month.day. "
        + "For example, today is " + todayToString() + ".",
        foo,
        bar);

alert.setTitle("Date format warning");
Optional<ButtonType> result = alert.showAndWait();

if (result.orElse(bar) == foo) {
    formatGotIt = true;
}
4
((Button) dialog.getDialogPane().lookupButton(ButtonType.OK)).setText("Not OK Anymore");
((Button) dialog.getDialogPane().lookupButton(ButtonType.CANCEL)).setText("Not Cancel Anymore");
  • 1
    Not Relevant Anymore – coderodde Mar 15 '18 at 14:46
  • 1
    Actually, I find this might be useful to someone. Especially in case of JavaFx dialog like Alert. Example: Alert errorAlert = new Alert(Alert.AlertType.ERROR); – M. S. Mar 15 '18 at 16:06

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