I am trying to fit a morse potential using a python and scipy. The morse potential is defined as:

V = D*(exp(-2*m*(x-u)) - 2*exp(-m*(x-u)))

where D, m and u are the parameters I need to extract.

Unfortunately the fit is not satisfactory as you can see below (sorry I do not have 10 reputation so the image has to be clicked). Could anyone help me please? I must say I am not the best programmer with python.

Here is my code:

from scipy.optimize import curve_fit
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


xdata2=np.array([1.0 ,1.1 ,1.2 ,1.3 ,1.4 ,1.5 ,1.6 ,1.7 ,1.8 ,1.9 ,2.0 ,2.1 ,2.2 ,2.3 ,2.4 ,2.5 ,2.6 ,2.7 ,2.8 ,2.9 ,3.0 ,3.1 ,3.2 ,3.3 ,3.4 ,3.5 ,3.6 ,3.7 ,3.8 ,3.9 ,4.0 ,4.1 ,4.2 ,4.3 ,4.4 ,4.5 ,4.6 ,4.7 ,4.8 ,4.9 ,5.0 ,5.1 ,5.2 ,5.3 ,5.4 ,5.5 ,5.6 ,5.7 ,5.8 ,5.9])
ydata2=[-1360.121815,-1368.532641,-1374.215047,-1378.090480,-1380.648178,-1382.223113,-1383.091562,-1383.479384,-1383.558087,-1383.445803,-1383.220380,-1382.931531,-1382.609269,-1382.273574,-1381.940879,-1381.621299,-1381.319042,-1381.036231,-1380.772039,-1380.527051,-1380.301961,-1380.096257,-1379.907700,-1379.734621,-1379.575837,-1379.430693,-1379.299282,-1379.181303,-1379.077272,-1378.985220,-1378.903626,-1378.831588,-1378.768880,-1378.715015,-1378.668910,-1378.629996,-1378.597943,-1378.572742,-1378.554547,-1378.543296,-1378.539843,-1378.543593,-1378.554519,-1378.572747,-1378.597945,-1378.630024,-1378.668911,-1378.715015,-1378.768915,-1378.831593]


t=np.linspace(0.1,7)

def morse(q, m, u, x ):
    return (q * (np.exp(-2*m*(x-u))-2*np.exp(-m*(x-u))))

popt, pcov = curve_fit(morse, xdata2, ydata2, maxfev=40000000)

yfit = morse(t,popt[0], popt[1], popt[2])

print popt



plt.plot(xdata2, ydata2,"ro")
plt.plot(t, yfit)

plt.show()

Morse fit 2

Old fit before gboffi's comment Morse Fit

  • I don't think you want to estimate your free variable x but rather the parameter u.. – gboffi Mar 30 '16 at 14:59
  • Yes you are right sorry, I need the parameter u, the equilibrium bond distance. However the fit seems even worse now. I must be doing something wrong – Joesmaker Mar 30 '16 at 15:08
  • 2
    The function exp(-2m(x-u))-2exp(-m(x-u)) is -1 for x=u and goes to 0 very fast (faster for larger ms) for increasing values of x>u. If you have ONLY ONE SCALING PARAMETER (D or q, whatever,) you CAN NOT fit a function like yours, because the scaling factor applies only to the local minimum and not to the asymptotic maximum of your data. – gboffi Mar 30 '16 at 15:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am guessing the exact depth of the morse potential does not interest you overly much. So I added an additional parameter to shift the morse potential up and down (v), includes @gboffis comment. Furthermore, the first argument of your function must be the arguments, not the parameters you want to fit (see http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy-0.16.1/reference/generated/scipy.optimize.curve_fit.html)

In addition, such fits are dependent on your starting position. The following should give you what you want.

from scipy.optimize import curve_fit
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


xdata2=np.array([1.0 ,1.1 ,1.2 ,1.3 ,1.4 ,1.5 ,1.6 ,1.7 ,1.8 ,1.9 ,2.0 ,2.1 ,2.2 ,2.3 ,2.4 ,2.5 ,2.6 ,2.7 ,2.8 ,2.9 ,3.0 ,3.1 ,3.2 ,3.3 ,3.4 ,3.5 ,3.6 ,3.7 ,3.8 ,3.9 ,4.0 ,4.1 ,4.2 ,4.3 ,4.4 ,4.5 ,4.6 ,4.7 ,4.8 ,4.9 ,5.0 ,5.1 ,5.2 ,5.3 ,5.4 ,5.5 ,5.6 ,5.7 ,5.8 ,5.9])
ydata2=[-1360.121815,-1368.532641,-1374.215047,-1378.090480,-1380.648178,-1382.223113,-1383.091562,-1383.479384,-1383.558087,-1383.445803,-1383.220380,-1382.931531,-1382.609269,-1382.273574,-1381.940879,-1381.621299,-1381.319042,-1381.036231,-1380.772039,-1380.527051,-1380.301961,-1380.096257,-1379.907700,-1379.734621,-1379.575837,-1379.430693,-1379.299282,-1379.181303,-1379.077272,-1378.985220,-1378.903626,-1378.831588,-1378.768880,-1378.715015,-1378.668910,-1378.629996,-1378.597943,-1378.572742,-1378.554547,-1378.543296,-1378.539843,-1378.543593,-1378.554519,-1378.572747,-1378.597945,-1378.630024,-1378.668911,-1378.715015,-1378.768915,-1378.831593]


t=np.linspace(0.1,7)

tstart = [1.e+3, 1, 3, 0]
def morse(x, q, m, u , v):
    return (q * (np.exp(-2*m*(x-u))-2*np.exp(-m*(x-u))) + v)

popt, pcov = curve_fit(morse, xdata2, ydata2, p0 = tstart,  maxfev=40000000)
print popt # [    5.10155662     1.43329962     1.7991549  -1378.53461345]


yfit = morse(t,popt[0], popt[1], popt[2], popt[3])

#print popt
#
#
#
plt.plot(xdata2, ydata2,"ro")
plt.plot(t, yfit)

plt.show()

enter image description here

  • Thanks a lot to you both, that worked like a charm. That is true I do not need the exact depth. And thanks a lot for the extra info. Cheers again. – Joesmaker Mar 30 '16 at 19:39
  • May I question, at least in this case, the need for a good initial estimate of the parameters? Your estimate was not a good one, but the fit is indeed good enough, isn't it? – gboffi Mar 30 '16 at 20:04
  • I left out the p0 parameter at first and the result was much worse. So yeah, some initial guess is needed, even though the one I provided is a bit off. – Mohammed Li Mar 30 '16 at 21:07

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