3

I had the following code in my program.

//Compare class
class SortByFutureVolume
{
public:
        SortByFutureVolume(const Graph& _g): g(_g){}

        bool operator() (const Index& lhs, const Index& rhs){
            return g.getNode(lhs).futureVolume() > g.getNode(rhs).futureVolume();
        }
    private:
        Graph g;
};

And then I use it for sorting like this:

    std::sort(nodes.begin(), nodes.end(),SortByFutureVolume(g));

When I run the above code on my mac computer for a vector of size 23K it completes in a fraction of seconds. However, when I run on my ubuntu 14 machine. It takes several minutes and it hasn't even completed yet.

I search for this problem and found the following solution here Can I prevent std::sort from copying the passed comparison object

Basically modifying my code as so fixes the problem:

SortByFutureVolume s(g);
std::sort(_nodes.begin(), _nodes.begin()+ end, std::ref(s));

After this the runtime on both my mac an ubuntu are comparable. Very much faster.

I know that this works but I'm trying to understand why? I know that slow code above was due to copying of graph and SortByFutureVolume. Why do you need std::ref()? Is this solution even correct and is there a better way to do this?

  • Yes same level. However, on my mac using htop to visualize memory, I realized my mac used 4 cores for the sorting – Emmanuel John Mar 30 '16 at 18:04
  • @juanchopanza How is the graph copied if I'm passing by reference? – Emmanuel John Mar 30 '16 at 18:05
  • You have a flaw: The iterator of nodes is no iterator to a node, but some Index. Make an iterator able to dereference the desired node. – user2249683 Mar 30 '16 at 18:05
  • @unekwu It gets copied into g, Graph g;. – juanchopanza Mar 30 '16 at 18:06
  • @DieterLücking I actually meant vector<Index> – Emmanuel John Mar 30 '16 at 18:08
4

Instead of having a Graph data member in SortByFutureVolume you should have a Graph & or const Graph & if g can be read only. This way, anytime the SortByFutureVolume is copied the Graph is not copied.

class SortByFutureVolume
{
public:
        SortByFutureVolume(const Graph& _g): g(_g){}

        bool operator() (const Index& lhs, const Index& rhs){
            return g.getNode(lhs).futureVolume() > g.getNode(rhs).futureVolume();
        }
    private:
        Graph& g;
        // or
        const Graph& g;
};

As pointed out by Benjamin Lindley in the comments if You change SortByFutureVolume to store a pointer to the Graph instead of a refernece then SortByFutureVolume becomes copy assignable as pointers can be assigned but references cannot. That would give you

class SortByFutureVolume
{
public:
        SortByFutureVolume(const Graph& _g): g(&_g){}

        bool operator() (const Index& lhs, const Index& rhs){
            return g->getNode(lhs).futureVolume() > g->getNode(rhs).futureVolume();
        }
    private:
        const Graph * g;
};

As a side not it is okay to have _g as a variable name in a function parameter as it does not start with a capital letter but it is a good habit to not use leading underscores. This is doubly true in the global space where _g would be an invalid identifier as it is reserved for the implementation.

  • 1
    I would recommend a pointer. Doesn't make much sense for the object to be copy constructible, but not copy assignable. – Benjamin Lindley Mar 30 '16 at 18:12
  • @BenjaminLindley, why? I know a lot of objects which are exactly that. Also having a pointer would prevent the sorter from using temporary object. – SergeyA Mar 30 '16 at 18:13
  • 1
    @SergeyA: Why would you want that? And no, it doesn't prevent temporaries. You would still take the object in to the constructor by reference, but then take its address in the initialization. – Benjamin Lindley Mar 30 '16 at 18:17
  • @BenjaminLindley, not in this case, but I know of business logic objects where copy construction is straightforward, but assingment is convoluted (and not neccessary). In this case it is simply not neccessary. As for pointer - yes, you are correct. – SergeyA Mar 30 '16 at 18:23
  • @BenjaminLindley I added an example of using a pointer. It hadn't even crossed my mind that you would want the comparator to be copy assignable – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Mar 30 '16 at 18:26
3

std::ref is a pointer in disguise. What the code does is that instead of copying a heavy-weight SortByFutureVolume object, it copies around the pointer to the same object - which is obviously much faster.

The option would be to make the Graph g a (const) reference inside the sorter object.

  • But the graph object is still copied into the functor s. – juanchopanza Mar 30 '16 at 18:02
  • @juanchopanza, likely this is not a big performance problem - judging by other evidence. I assume, std::sort implementation OP has does a copy of sorter on every iteration. – SergeyA Mar 30 '16 at 18:03
  • Makes sense. How is this done before c++11? I'm pretty new to the language. – Emmanuel John Mar 30 '16 at 18:07
  • Like i said - by having your Graph g as a (const) reference to the actual object inside the class. – SergeyA Mar 30 '16 at 18:09
  • That fixes it. Thanks. – Emmanuel John Mar 30 '16 at 18:10
2

Your SortByFutureVolume was making a copy of whole graph each time it was being copied, and std::sort does a lot of copies by value of comparison function object.

see here:

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/49b9cdad8eb3bc06

for simple std::vector<int> sort it made internally 20 instantiations of SortByFutureVolume class. This same number of times your graph was probably copied.

std::ref copies only reference to your comparison function object - this removes all the deep copies and so also speeds up whole thing.

2

The prototype for the std::sort variant you are calling is

template< class RandomIt, class Compare >
void sort( RandomIt first, RandomIt last, Compare comp );

(see http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/sort)

The compiler thus deduces that when you pass an unqualified SortByFutureVolume(g) you are passing by value. Constructing the temporary with your definition of SortByFutureVolume requires a deep copy of the graph. Potentially there is then a second copy made as the temporary is passed by value. If this parameter is passed by value within sort, further copies will be made.

When you use std::ref() the compiler can deduce that the third argument is a reference and so the pass becomes by reference, eliminating secondary copies of the graph.

As others have pointed out, the solution is to make member g a reference and make the constructor accept by reference.

class SortByFutureVolume {
    const Graph& g;

public:
    SortByFutureVolume(const Graph& g_) : g(g_) {}

    bool operator() (const Index& lhs, const Index& rhs){
        return g.getNode(lhs).futureVolume() > g.getNode(rhs).futureVolume();
    }
};

of course, if you have a C++11 compatible compiler, you could just use a lambda:

std::sort(nodes.begin(), nodes.end(), [&g](const Index& lhs, const Index& rhs) {
    return g.getNode(lhs).futureVolume() > g.getNode(rhs).futureVolume();
});
  • Good catch, copy-pasta error – kfsone Mar 30 '16 at 18:53

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