25

What is the right way to use a class defined in one file and extend it another, in node.js?

Currently I have:

'use strict'

class BasePageHandler {

    constructor(app, settings, context) {

    }
}

return module.exports;

In the 'child' class file I have:

'use strict'

var BasePageHandler = require ('./../BasePageHandler.js');

class FrontpagePageHandler extends BasePageHandler {
    constructor(app, settings, context) {
         super(app, settings, context);
         this.settings = settings;
         this.context = context;
    }
}

This fails with the following error:

TypeError: Class extends value #<Object> is not a function or null

Note, if I have the BasePageHandler in the same file then it works, so it is really when the class is in another file I have an issue.

Currently using node 4.4.0.

1

2 Answers 2

40

You need to correctly export your class inBasePageHandler.js file:

module.exports = BasePageHandler;
5
  • Indeed. I missed the obvious :)
    – Andre M
    Mar 30, 2016 at 21:21
  • 4
    I'm pretty sure you can also just put it on 1 line: module.exports = class BasePageHandler { that way if you rename the class, it's 1 less place to change it later. Mar 30, 2016 at 22:19
  • 1
    Event after doing this, I'm still having the same issue? I'm using the harmony_destructuring flag!
    – James111
    May 6, 2016 at 6:56
  • I had an issue similar where I was trying to return the class by making module.exports into a function. It worked but not as expected. By simply defining module.exports to be the class, everything worked as expected. Oct 30, 2017 at 19:23
  • I did it too, but it does not work for me, any other solution please @madox2
    – Md Alamin
    Aug 7, 2018 at 6:55
17

The accepted answer is technically fine, but really if you're using ES6 then you should go all in and use ES6 export/import.

/*jshint esversion: 6 */

class BasePageHandler {
    constructor(app, settings, context) {
    }
}

export default BasePageHandler;

and then:

/*jshint esversion: 6 */

import BasePageHandler from './../BasePageHandler.js';

class FrontpagePageHandler extends BasePageHandler {
    constructor(app, settings, context) {
         super(app, settings, context);
         this.settings = settings;
         this.context = context;
    }
}
1
  • 9
    BTW, there's no need 'use strict' in ES6 - it's enforced by default.
    – Noam Manos
    Mar 17, 2017 at 19:49

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