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I've stumbled onto an odd NSDecimalNumber behavior: for some values, invocations of integerValue, longValue, longLongValue, etc., return the an unexpected value. Example:

let v = NSDecimalNumber(string: "9.821426272392280061")
v                  // evaluates to 9.821426272392278
v.intValue         // evaluates to 9
v.integerValue     // evaluates to -8
v.longValue        // evaluates to -8
v.longLongValue    // evaluates to -8

let v2 = NSDecimalNumber(string: "9.821426272392280060")
v2                  // evaluates to 9.821426272392278
v2.intValue         // evaluates to 9
v2.integerValue     // evaluates to 9
v2.longValue        // evaluates to 9
v2.longLongValue    // evaluates to 9

This is using XCode 7.3; I haven't tested using earlier versions of the frameworks.

I've seen a bunch of discussion about unexpected rounding behavior with NSDecimalNumber, as well as admonishments not to initialize it with the inherited NSNumber initializers, but I haven't seen anything about this specific behavior. Nevertheless there are some rather detailed discussions about internal representations and rounding which may contain the nugget I seek, so apologies in advance if I missed it.

EDIT: It's buried in the comments, but I've filed this as issue #25465729 with Apple. OpenRadar: http://www.openradar.me/radar?id=5007005597040640.

EDIT 2: Apple has marked this as a dup of #19812966.

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  • In case it's relevant, the hex representations of these values are 0xFFFFFFF8 and 0x9. Or in binary, 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1000 and 1001.
    – nhgrif
    Mar 31, 2016 at 0:57
  • Thanks @nhgrif; I've updated the title / body to reflect this. Mar 31, 2016 at 1:10
  • The reference for NSNumber does include a warning: "Because numeric types have different storage capabilities, attempting to initialize with a value of one type and access the value of another type may produce an erroneous result" Mar 31, 2016 at 1:55
  • Have you tried this in Objective-C? Is this a problem with NSDecimalNumber or with Swift?
    – nhgrif
    Mar 31, 2016 at 12:02
  • 1
    Also, that's not the two's compliment of the value....
    – nhgrif
    Mar 31, 2016 at 12:10

2 Answers 2

1

Since you already know the problem is due to "too high precision", you could workaround it by rounding the decimal number first:

let b = NSDecimalNumber(string: "9.999999999999999999")
print(b, "->", b.int64Value)
// 9.999999999999999999 -> -8

let truncateBehavior = NSDecimalNumberHandler(roundingMode: .down,
                                              scale: 0,
                                              raiseOnExactness: true,
                                              raiseOnOverflow: true,
                                              raiseOnUnderflow: true,
                                              raiseOnDivideByZero: true)
let c = b.rounding(accordingToBehavior: truncateBehavior)
print(c, "->", c.int64Value)
// 9 -> 9

If you want to use int64Value (i.e. -longLongValue), avoid using numbers with more than 62 bits of precision, i.e. avoid having more than 18 digits totally. Reasons explained below.


NSDecimalNumber is internally represented as a Decimal structure:

typedef struct {
      signed int _exponent:8;
      unsigned int _length:4;
      unsigned int _isNegative:1;
      unsigned int _isCompact:1;
      unsigned int _reserved:18;
      unsigned short _mantissa[NSDecimalMaxSize];  // NSDecimalMaxSize = 8
} NSDecimal;

This can be obtained using .decimalValue, e.g.

let v2 = NSDecimalNumber(string: "9.821426272392280061")
let d = v2.decimalValue
print(d._exponent, d._mantissa, d._length)
// -18 (30717, 39329, 46888, 34892, 0, 0, 0, 0) 4

This means 9.821426272392280061 is internally stored as 9821426272392280061 × 10-18 — note that 9821426272392280061 = 34892 × 655363 + 46888 × 655362 + 39329 × 65536 + 30717.

Now compare with 9.821426272392280060:

let v2 = NSDecimalNumber(string: "9.821426272392280060")
let d = v2.decimalValue
print(d._exponent, d._mantissa, d._length)
// -17 (62054, 3932, 17796, 3489, 0, 0, 0, 0) 4

Note that the exponent is reduced to -17, meaning the trailing zero is omitted by Foundation.


Knowing the internal structure, I now make a claim: the bug is because 34892 ≥ 32768. Observe:

let a = NSDecimalNumber(decimal: Decimal(
    _exponent: -18, _length: 4, _isNegative: 0, _isCompact: 1, _reserved: 0,
    _mantissa: (65535, 65535, 65535, 32767, 0, 0, 0, 0)))
let b = NSDecimalNumber(decimal: Decimal(
    _exponent: -18, _length: 4, _isNegative: 0, _isCompact: 1, _reserved: 0,
    _mantissa: (0, 0, 0, 32768, 0, 0, 0, 0)))
print(a, "->", a.int64Value)
print(b, "->", b.int64Value)
// 9.223372036854775807 -> 9
// 9.223372036854775808 -> -9

Note that 32768 × 655363 = 263 is the value just enough to overflow a signed 64-bit number. Therefore, I suspect that the bug is due to Foundation implementing int64Value as (1) convert the mantissa directly into an Int64, and then (2) divide by 10|exponent|.

In fact, if you disassemble Foundation.framework, you will find that it is basically how int64Value is implemented (this is independent of the platform's pointer width).

But why int32Value isn't affected? Because internally it is just implemented as Int32(self.doubleValue), so no overflow issue would occur. Unfortunately a double only has 53 bits of precision, so Apple has no choice but to implement int64Value (requiring 64 bits of precision) without floating-point arithmetics.

0

I'd file a bug with Apple if I were you. The docs say that NSDecimalNumber can represent any value up to 38 digits long. NSDecimalNumber inherits those properties from NSNumber, and the docs don't explicitly say what conversion is involved at that point, but the only reasonable interpretation is that if the number is roundable to and representable as an Int, then you get the correct answer.

It looks to me like a bug in handling the sign-extension during the conversion somewhere, since intValue is 32-bit and integerValue is 64-bit (in Swift).

1
  • Yup, that's what I suspected. Filed as issue #25465729. Mar 31, 2016 at 16:34

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