39

I use custom errors (es6-error) allowing me to handle errors based on their class like so:

import { DatabaseEntryNotFoundError, NotAllowedError } from 'customError';

function fooRoute(req, res) {
  doSomethingAsync()
    .then(() => {
      // on resolve / success
      return res.send(200);
    })
    .catch((error) => {
      // on reject / failure
      if (error instanceof DatabaseEntryNotFoundError) {
        return res.send(404);
      } else if (error instanceof NotAllowedError) {
        return res.send(400);
      }
      log('Failed to do something async with an unspecified error: ', error);
      return res.send(500);
    };
}

Now I'd rather use a switch for this type of flow, resulting in something like:

import { DatabaseEntryNotFoundError, NotAllowedError } from 'customError';

function fooRoute(req, res) {
  doSomethingAsync()
    .then(() => {
      // on resolve / success
      return res.send(200);
    })
    .catch((error) => {
      // on reject / failure
      switch (error instanceof) {
        case NotAllowedError:
          return res.send(400);
        case DatabaseEntryNotFoundError:
          return res.send(404);
        default:
          log('Failed to do something async with an unspecified error: ', error);
          return res.send(500);
      }
    });
}

instanceof doesn't work like that however. So the latter fails.

Is there any way to check an instance for its class in a switch statement?

74

A good option is to use the constructor property of the object:

// on reject / failure
switch (error.constructor) {
    case NotAllowedError:
        return res.send(400);
    case DatabaseEntryNotFoundError:
        return res.send(404);
    default:
        log('Failed to do something async with an unspecified error: ', error);
        return res.send(500);
}

Notice that the constructor must match exactly with the one that object was created (suppose error is an instance of NotAllowedError and NotAllowedError is a subclass of Error):

  • error.constructor === NotAllowedError is true
  • error.constructor === Error is false

This makes a difference from instanceof, which can match also the super class:

  • error instanceof NotAllowedError is true
  • error instanceof Error is true

Check this interesting post about constructor property.

  • I like this more than my own answer. This way I won't have to check against strings but can check against the actual object. I'm not sure which would be more sensible from a technical perspective however. – alextes Mar 31 '16 at 11:58
  • It's easier to write the constructor function than it's name: the autocomplete :). – Dmitri Pavlutin Mar 31 '16 at 11:59
  • 3
    A word of warning to go with this: If you transpile using Babel you may find that the above switch statement always hits the default case. Babel doesn't allow you to subclass built in types like error without using babel-plugin-transform-builtin-extend – Edward Woolhouse Aug 6 '18 at 7:39
  • @EdwardWoolhouse does this apply even now? It's good that i saw you're warning – Moe Elsharif Aug 17 '18 at 15:30
8

Workaround, to avoid if-else. Found here

switch (true) {
    case error instanceof NotAllowedError: 
        return res.send(400);

    case error instanceof DatabaseEntryNotFoundError: 
        return res.send(404);

    default:
        log('Failed to do something async with an unspecified error: ', error);
        return res.send(500);
}
  • 2
    This should be the answer because it's 'backwards compatible' to all flavours/flavors of JS. Using error.constructor will not work in all browsers, and versions of Babel – Nick Mitchell Jan 26 at 6:03
0

An alternative to this switch case is to just have a status field in the Error's constructor.

For Example, build your error like so:

class NotAllowedError extends Error {
    constructor(message, status) {
        super(message);
        this.message = message;
        this.status = 403; // Forbidden error code
    }
}

Handle your error like so:

.catch((error) => {
  res.send(error.status);
});
  • You're assuming that the caller is a function that handles HTTP communication. Coupling logic of the caller with the invoked function is generally not a good idea. Say the caller has a special case where the response is 200 despite the NotAllowed error the function throwing the error now needs to understand the difference and throw the correct NotAllowedError. – alextes Aug 22 '18 at 9:31
  • @AlexTes I am struggling to understand what is wrong with assuming the caller is a function that handles the HTTP communication. What else could a res.send be taking into account the original question? Additionally, you mention a special case around a 200 error. They could add an if in the catch to handle that. My intention here was to give an alternative solution to the original question. Im sorry if im misreading this but it seems like you're applying my answer to an entirely different scope? – Lachlan Young Aug 23 '18 at 6:01
  • My only point is that it is nicer for doSomethingAsync to know nothing about what is calling it. Since it throws the error, and the way the fooRoute works depends on what is in the error, doSomethingAsync now potentially has to be aware of how fooRoute works in order to throw the error with the correct status code. They'd be tied together. – alextes Aug 23 '18 at 20:41
  • 1
    Ah! Thanks for explaining Alex, that's a really good point. I didnt realise you wanted to keep it so seperate, I suppose it's just better practice. – Lachlan Young Aug 23 '18 at 23:39

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