3

I have a matrix of Bool values, for example

x = bitrand(2,3)

If I try to save this to a file:

writedlm("mat.txt", x)

I get a matrix of true and false. I would like to get instead a matrix of 0 and 1 (where 0 replaces false and 1 replaces true). Is there a simple way to do this, perhaps by some options in writedlm, without writing the file line by line myself?

  • 4
    Try 1*x, it gets the numerical version (perhaps not super memory/time efficient, but good enough for non "big data" stuff). 0x1*x will get a UInt8 more memory compact (but probably slower). – Dan Getz Mar 31 '16 at 18:12
  • 1
    @DanGetz You should post that as an answer. It's the simplest solution. – becko Mar 31 '16 at 19:31
3

Try 1*x, it gets the numerical version (perhaps not super memory/time efficient, but good enough for non "big data" stuff). 0x1*x will get a UInt8 - more memory compact (but probably slower).

5
writedlm("mat.txt", map(Int8,x))

Takes each element of x and converts it to an integer using the Int8 function/constructor.

You could also use other integer types but Int8 is more memory efficient than for example Int64.

  • 2
    You can also use Int8 which would achieve the same thing, yet is much more memory efficient. Tried it with 800x800 matrix and Int64 used 4.8MB while Int8 used only 0.6MB. – niczky12 Mar 31 '16 at 13:58
  • This involves loading a full copy of the converted matrix into memory. I'm doing this writedlm inside a loop, so I think the performance impact is too much. – becko Mar 31 '16 at 14:02
  • Is there a lazy version of map? I'm googling but cannot find any. – becko Mar 31 '16 at 14:03
  • There's Lazy.jl and LazySequences.jl. If these don't work out for you, you might as well write your own output function – Felipe Lema Mar 31 '16 at 14:15
  • 3
    The IO (input/output) will probably be much slower than the map. You can test this with the built-in profiler in Julia. – David P. Sanders Mar 31 '16 at 15:03
0

Another option that is slightly faster is to copy the array to UInt8 on the fly as Array{UInt8, ndims(x)}(x), rather than applying map:

>>> x = bitrand(100,100)
>>> a = map(UInt8, x)
>>> b = Array{UInt8, ndims(x)}(x)
>>> all(a .== b)
true

I ran quick some tests and it is sightly faster the larger the matrices are (at least in my computer).

for i in [10, 100, 1_000, 10_000]
    x = bitrand(i,i)
    println("$i x $i")
    @time map(UInt8, x)
    @time Array{UInt8, ndims(x)}(x)
end

Outputs:

10 x 10
  0.000002 seconds (2 allocations: 208 bytes)
  0.000006 seconds (2 allocations: 208 bytes)
100 x 100
  0.000053 seconds (2 allocations: 9.891 KB)
  0.000018 seconds (2 allocations: 9.891 KB)
1000 x 1000
  0.001945 seconds (5 allocations: 976.703 KB)
  0.001490 seconds (5 allocations: 976.703 KB)
10000 x 10000
  0.224491 seconds (5 allocations: 95.368 MB)
  0.117774 seconds (5 allocations: 95.368 MB)
  • 1
    I usually understand the word "cast" as meaning what in Julia is called reinterpret, i.e. look at the same bits in memory in a different way. Here you are, however, again creating a new matrix. – David P. Sanders Mar 31 '16 at 20:30
  • @DavidP.Sanders I do agree that cast shouldn't create a copy, maybe is not the best word here (reworded to copy). reinterpret(UInt8, x) is the best solution if x is an Array{Bool}, however, bitrand returns a BitArray which is not supported by reinterpret. – Imanol Luengo Mar 31 '16 at 20:43

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