Is there a way to replace null values in pyspark dataframe with the last valid value? There is addtional timestamp and session columns if you think you need them for windows partitioning and ordering. More specifically, I'd like to achieve the following conversion:

+---------+-----------+-----------+      +---------+-----------+-----------+
| session | timestamp |         id|      | session | timestamp |         id|
+---------+-----------+-----------+      +---------+-----------+-----------+
|        1|          1|       null|      |        1|          1|       null|
|        1|          2|        109|      |        1|          2|        109|
|        1|          3|       null|      |        1|          3|        109|
|        1|          4|       null|      |        1|          4|        109|
|        1|          5|        109| =>   |        1|          5|        109|
|        1|          6|       null|      |        1|          6|        109|
|        1|          7|        110|      |        1|          7|        110|
|        1|          8|       null|      |        1|          8|        110|
|        1|          9|       null|      |        1|          9|        110|
|        1|         10|       null|      |        1|         10|        110|
+---------+-----------+-----------+      +---------+-----------+-----------+
  • You can't. There is no order between DataFrames rows. – eliasah Mar 31 '16 at 21:45
  • What if I have an order by timestamp? – Oleksiy Mar 31 '16 at 21:47
  • Can't you partition by widows of some kind? What do you do in this case, manually process entries one by one and keep the state? – Oleksiy Mar 31 '16 at 21:52
  • @eliasah "Not possible" is a strong assertion, one that I'd use sparingly. As several answers below have demonstrated, it is possible. (Although the solutions may not be applicable in every situation.) – lostsoul29 Nov 8 at 12:27
  • @lostsoul29 my comment was given for the state of the question at that time and it is outdated now. I'll remove it. Thanks ! – eliasah Nov 8 at 12:36
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This seems to be doing the trick using Window functions:

import sys
from pyspark.sql.window import Window
import pyspark.sql.functions as func

def fill_nulls(df):
    df_na = df.na.fill(-1)
    lag = df_na.withColumn('id_lag', func.lag('id', default=-1)\
                           .over(Window.partitionBy('session')\
                                 .orderBy('timestamp')))

    switch = lag.withColumn('id_change',
                            ((lag['id'] != lag['id_lag']) &
                             (lag['id'] != -1)).cast('integer'))


    switch_sess = switch.withColumn(
        'sub_session',
        func.sum("id_change")
        .over(
            Window.partitionBy("session")
            .orderBy("timestamp")
            .rowsBetween(-sys.maxsize, 0))
    )

    fid = switch_sess.withColumn('nn_id',
                           func.first('id')\
                           .over(Window.partitionBy('session', 'sub_session')\
                                 .orderBy('timestamp')))

    fid_na = fid.replace(-1, 'null')

    ff = fid_na.drop('id').drop('id_lag')\
                          .drop('id_change')\
                          .drop('sub_session').\
                          withColumnRenamed('nn_id', 'id')

    return ff

Here is the full null_test.py.

  • @eliasah: could you review the answer? – Oleksiy Apr 4 '16 at 15:39
  • I'm actually looking at it now. – eliasah Apr 4 '16 at 15:39
  • added test to make life easier if it helps – Oleksiy Apr 4 '16 at 15:48
  • 1
    I was writing my test ! Thanks. The answer seems very clean to me. Having sessions is essential which made it possible to partition by and thus use the window function ! – eliasah Apr 4 '16 at 15:57
  • 1
    Thanks for the code review! – Oleksiy Apr 4 '16 at 16:00

I believe I have a much simpler solution than the accepted. It is using Functions too, but uses the function called 'LAST' and ignores nulls.

Let's re-create something similar to the original data:

import sys
from pyspark.sql.window import Window
import pyspark.sql.functions as func

d = [{'session': 1, 'ts': 1}, {'session': 1, 'ts': 2, 'id': 109}, {'session': 1, 'ts': 3}, {'session': 1, 'ts': 4, 'id': 110}, {'session': 1, 'ts': 5},  {'session': 1, 'ts': 6}]
df = spark.createDataFrame(d)

This prints:

+-------+---+----+
|session| ts|  id|
+-------+---+----+
|      1|  1|null|
|      1|  2| 109|
|      1|  3|null|
|      1|  4| 110|
|      1|  5|null|
|      1|  6|null|
+-------+---+----+

Now, if we use the window function LAST:

df.withColumn("id", func.last('id', True).over(Window.partitionBy('session').orderBy('ts').rowsBetween(-sys.maxsize, 0))).show()

We just get:

+-------+---+----+
|session| ts|  id|
+-------+---+----+
|      1|  1|null|
|      1|  2| 109|
|      1|  3| 109|
|      1|  4| 110|
|      1|  5| 110|
|      1|  6| 110|
+-------+---+----+

Hope it helps!

  • A word of caution: This answer will collect all rows of each session to some executor node. This will result in failed jobs if the number of rows in some session is larger than the memory of your executor nodes. – Jordan P Sep 19 '17 at 22:39

@Oleksiy's answer is great, but didn't fully work for my requirements. Within a session, if multiple nulls are observed, all are filled with the first non-null for the session. I needed the last non-null value to propagate forward.

The following tweak worked for my use case:

def fill_forward(df, id_column, key_column, fill_column):

    # Fill null's with last *non null* value in the window
    ff = df.withColumn(
        'fill_fwd',
        func.last(fill_column, True) # True: fill with last non-null
        .over(
            Window.partitionBy(id_column)
            .orderBy(key_column)
            .rowsBetween(-sys.maxsize, 0))
        )

    # Drop the old column and rename the new column
    ff_out = ff.drop(fill_column).withColumnRenamed('fill_fwd', fill_column)

    return ff_out

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