83

I want to attach a UUID to a field in my protobuf User message example.

message User {
  // field containing id as UUID type
  required string email;
  optional string name;
}

I know that protobuf messages do not yet support the UUID type. I've read that the best approach is to have a UUID message type.

So I'm guessing my User message would import my UUID message proto definition and use it as a field type like so:

import "myproject/UUID.proto";

message User {
  required UUID id;
  required string email;
  optional string name;
}

My question is, what will the UUID message look like, and how will I encode/decode it? I'm aiming for Java/Scala and C# compatibility.

4 Answers 4

78

You should probably use string or bytes to represent a UUID. Use string if it is most convenient to keep the UUID in human-readable format (e.g. "de305d54-75b4-431b-adb2-eb6b9e546014") or use bytes if you are storing the 128-bit value raw. (If you aren't sure, you probably want string.)

Wrapping the value in a message type called UUID can be helpful to make the code more self-documenting but will have some performance overhead and isn't strictly required. If you want to do this, define the type like:

message UUID {
  required string value = 1;
}

or:

message UUID {
  required bytes value = 1;
}
9
  • 1
    @Hyperreal: FWIW, to convert to bytes you would remove the hyphens and then interpret the rest as a hex string -- each two digits becomes a byte. But yeah, probably storing a string is easier. Apr 2, 2016 at 22:13
  • 1
    So I looked up the new protocol buffer you are working on (Cap'N Proto) and I might abandon Google's Protobuff altogether for yours anyway... I see someone has a Java implementation in the works too (hopefully a Scala one in the future as well!). Apr 4, 2016 at 17:23
  • 1
    @Hyperreal Hah, well, note that the same question applies in Cap'n Proto, and the answer is basically the same. :) Apr 4, 2016 at 18:00
  • 2
    I agree with the protobuf team's decision here. Using string or bytes to represent a UUID is easy. Adding a built-in type would require adding complexity all across the protobuf implementation in every language. It's not worth it. Nov 29, 2018 at 18:21
  • 1
    @KingKong Seems like the answer would be to extend arenas to support strings and bytes. Aug 9, 2019 at 23:13
16

I don't have enough reputation points to make a comment, so I have to write this as an answer.

Use a string, not a byte array unlike what some other commenters are saying. According to MS (https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/architecture/grpc-for-wcf-developers/protobuf-data-types), "Don't use a bytes field for Guid values. Problems with endianness (Wikipedia definition) can result in erratic behavior when Protobuf is interacting with other platforms, such as Java."

2
  • 2
    One can have "erratic behavior" when they are simply either "lazy" or just "forgot" to implement logic properly by NOT forgetting to take endianness into account. This is not a UUIDs representation problem but a potentially wrong implementation of a logic that only "presents" UUIDs in "canonical textual format". The value itself is always just a sequence of exactly 128 bits. Aug 7, 2020 at 11:12
  • 8
    I apologise but I can't for the life of me understand your comment.
    – sw1337
    Aug 7, 2020 at 11:19
13

If anything, you want to use string to avoid problems with endianness. Note that a UUID and a MS GUID that have the same string representation (and therefore are the same "id") have, however, different byte-stream order (big-endian vs little-endian). If you use bytes in the protocol to communicate between Java using UUID and C# using System.Guid, you could end up with flipped IDs.

4
  • 34
    Endianness issues only effect multi-byte values like 16, 32, and 64 integers and floats where a choice has to be made regarding which end contains the higher order bytes. For an array of bytes, there is no endianness, so using bytes would not cause any endianness issues. If, on the other hand, the UUID was stored in two 64-bit integers, you would have to deal with endianness issues. Sep 10, 2018 at 17:30
  • 6
    @DougRichardson, GUID/UUID is not merely an array of bytes. It has a 4/2/2/2/6 byte structure and endianness does matter. Jul 12, 2019 at 21:08
  • 19
    @RobertTaylor That is true when you are generating the UUID in order to conform to RFC 4122, but once it is generated you can treat it like an opaque array of bytes. To see what I mean, look at the Go UUID library. Version 1 and Version 4 each create UUIDs taking byte ordering into account, but the marshalling treats both versions like a simple byte array. Since this question is about protobufs, we are only concerned with the marshaling aspect. Jul 13, 2019 at 9:17
  • 1
    @RobertTaylor, the link you provided (the Format section) defines just a "canonical textual representation". While the UUID itself is literally just a "128-bit number" without any other special constraints. I would even remove the word "number" from that definition and would define it as "128-bits sequence". Aug 7, 2020 at 11:07
11

I would suggest to use string encoding not byte encoding if you want to ensure straight forward interoperability:

message UUID {
  required string value = 1;
}

The problem with the bytes encoding is: Different UUID libraries use different encoding/decoding schemes for bytes while they agree how to encode/decode strings.

For example see the C#'s System.guid.toBytesArray returns a mixed-endian format: the first three components are little-endian encoded while the last two are big-endian encoded.

In Java, the Apache Commons Library Uuid.toRawBytes returns the uuid in big-endian encoding:

"String": 35918bc9-196d-40ea-9779-889d79b753f0
"C#"    : C9 8B 91 35 6D 19 EA 40 97 79 88 9D 79 B7 53 F0
"Java"  : 35 91 8B C9 19 6D 40 EA 97 79 88 9D 79 B7 53 F0

As a side note: Python 3's Uuid provides both encodings: bytes for the big-endian encoding and bytes_le for the mixed-endian encoding.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.