10

In julia we can check if an array contains a value, like so:

> 6 in [4,6,5]
true

However this returns false, when attempting to check for a sub-array in a specific order:

> [4,6] in [4,6,5]
false

What is the correct syntax to verify if a specific sub-array exists in an array?

4
  • The second result in the question does not match its description. It is a tuple of 4 and the first result. – Dan Getz Apr 1 '16 at 0:23
  • Package Iterators.jl also provides a useful function subsets, and you can write [4,6] in subsets([4,5,6]). – Gnimuc Apr 1 '16 at 1:37
  • That doesn't give the correct result, and even if it did, it doesn't scale at all (I benchmarked all of these with different lengths of vectors with Int64s) – Scott Jones Apr 2 '16 at 0:06
  • I misunderstood the question, for those who would like to check whether each element of array A(not consider A as a whole sequence) is included in another array B, setdiff(A, B) |> isempty is sufficient to do the job. – Gnimuc Jan 28 '18 at 10:54
6

For the third condition i.e. vector [4,6] appears as a sub-vector of 4,6,5 the following function is suggested:

issubvec(v,big) = 
  any([v == slice(big,i:(i+length(v)-1)) for i=1:(length(big)-length(v)+1)])

For the second condition, that is, give a boolean for each element in els vectors which appears in set vector, the following is suggested:

function vecin(els,set)
  res = zeros(Bool,size(els))
  res[findin(els,set)]=true
  res
end

With the vector in the OP, these result in:

julia> vecin([4,6],[4,6,5])
2-element Array{Bool,1}:
 true
 true

julia> issubvec([4,6],[4,6,5])
true
3
  • 1
    issubvec does return the correct result, but is also not very performant, because it is making many allocations. It's a good idea to use @time to see performance suffers due to excessive allocations. – Scott Jones Apr 2 '16 at 0:12
  • 1
    issubvec is certainly unoptimized, @ScottJones, but its logic is very clear - which was my intention. The function you wrote is better (and even more optimized algorithms for searching substrings/subvectors exist). I think such a generic subvectors functions might fit in Base (with similar names to string functions). – Dan Getz Apr 2 '16 at 8:38
  • Actually, I had to struggle with the logic of issubvec, with the combination of array comprehension and using the slice and any functions. That's not meant as a criticism, I love seeing the powerful things that can be done with Julia's array functions, but coming from C/C++/Java etc. I had to twist my brain to comprehend it. Also, I've seen that short sweet code like that often doesn't scale, and I'm a performance guy 🤓 – Scott Jones Apr 2 '16 at 10:15
8

I think it is worth mentioning that in Julia 1.0 you have the function issubset

> issubset([4,6], [4,6,5])
true

You can also quite conveniently call it using the \subseteq latex symbol

> [4,6] ⊆ [4,6,5]
true

This looks pretty optimized to me:

> using Random

> x, y = randperm(10^3)[1:10^2], randperm(10^3);

> @btime issubset(x, y);
16.153 μs (12 allocations: 45.96 KiB)
2
  • Wow, very nice, this should be the selected answers. Still works in julia 1.2.0 – Allan Karlson Dec 2 '19 at 13:02
  • 1
    Note that a subset is different from a subarray. [6,4] is not a subarray of [4,6,5]. – Cameron Bieganek Dec 23 '20 at 18:03
7

It takes a little bit of code to make a function that performs well, but this is much faster than the issubvec version above:

function subset2(x,y)
    lenx = length(x)
    first = x[1]
    if lenx == 1
        return findnext(y, first, 1) != 0
    end
    leny = length(y)
    lim = length(y) - length(x) + 1
    cur = 1
    while (cur = findnext(y, first, cur)) != 0
        cur > lim && break
        beg = cur
        @inbounds for i = 2:lenx
            y[beg += 1] != x[i] && (beg = 0 ; break)
        end
        beg != 0 && return true
        cur += 1
    end
    false
end

Note: it would also be much more useful if the function actually returned the position of the beginning of the subarray if found, or 0 if not, similarly to the findfirst/findnext functions.

Timing information (the second one is using my subset2 function):

  0.005273 seconds (65.70 k allocations: 4.073 MB)
  0.000086 seconds (4 allocations: 160 bytes)
6
  • The first @time result (for issubvec) looks like it might include compilation - it is too much of an outlier for such a simple call. Can you recheck (with a compile run before timing)? – Dan Getz Apr 2 '16 at 10:30
  • Not an outlier - I of course compiled before running (without the @time macro). I also tested various lengths, that one I showed was testing with vector of length 64K, searching for a sequence of 4 (the last 4 values in the vector). issubvec seems to have O(n) allocations, where n is the length of y. – Scott Jones Apr 2 '16 at 10:36
  • OK. The test case is important. If you add the test run code exactly, I can see if using Julia 0.5 vs. 0.4 can be important in this case. – Dan Getz Apr 2 '16 at 10:38
  • Maybe better to publish as a gist, and put the link here? – Scott Jones Apr 2 '16 at 10:40
  • Let's just leave it. Really, subset2 is more optimized (and if one wants to push, there are some more optimizations), but it might be for another discussion. – Dan Getz Apr 2 '16 at 10:46
2

note that you can now vectorize in with a dot:

julia> in([4,6,5]).([4, 6])
2-element BitArray{1}:
 true
 true

and chain with all to get your answer:

julia> all(in([4,6,5]).([4, 6]))
true
1
  • Nice. What if you want to avoid repeated item? For example all(in([4,6,5]).([4, 6, 6])) should return false, not true. – Timothée HENRY Dec 12 '19 at 14:00
1

I used this recently to find subsequences in arrays of integers. It's not as good or as fast as @scott's subset2(x,y)... but it returns the indices.

function findsequence(arr::Array{Int64}, seq::Array{Int64})
    indices = Int64[]
    i = 1
    n = length(seq)
    if n == 1
        while true
            occurrence = findnext(arr, seq[1], i)
            if occurrence == 0
                break
            else
                push!(indices, occurrence)
                i = occurrence +1
            end
        end
    else
        while true
            occurrence = Base._searchindex(arr, seq, i)
            if occurrence == 0
                break
            else
                push!(indices, occurrence)
                i = occurrence +1
            end
        end
    end
    return indices
end

julia> @time findsequence(rand(1:9, 1000), [2,3])
    0.000036 seconds (29 allocations: 8.766 KB)
    16-element Array{Int64,1}:
   80
  118
  138
  158
  234
  243
  409
  470
  539
  589
  619
  629
  645
  666
  762
  856
1
  • 1
    Yes, that's very useful. I also wasn't aware of Base._searchindex, I'll have to benchmark it! I think an iterator would be good as well, so as not to create a potentially large vector (could be up to the length of seq). – Scott Jones Apr 2 '16 at 10:40

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