36

Is there a way to make C a little more aware of types and assure type-safety?
Consider this:

typedef unsigned cent_t;
typedef unsigned dollar_t;

#define DOLLAR_2_CENT(dollar)       ((cent_t)(100*(dollar)))

void calc(cent_t amount) {
    // expecting 'amount' to semantically represents cents...
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    dollar_t amount = 50;
    calc(DOLLAR_2_CENT(amount));  // ok
    calc(amount);                 // raise warning
    return 0;
}

Is there a way to make the above code at-least raise warning by the gcc?
I know I can use C-structs to wrap unsigneds and achieve the desired result, I was just wondering if there was a more elegant way to do it.
Can it be a little more than that?

  • 17
    Make cent_t and dollar_t a struct, with just one member? – Leandros Apr 1 '16 at 8:32
  • 12
    C is not really a type-safe language. The simplest way to emulate type-safety is to use structures. – Some programmer dude Apr 1 '16 at 8:33
  • Declare all your functions properly before use (complete list of function arguments, etc). Pass structs rather than basic types (or typedefs of basic types). Prefer inline functions over macros. Turn up warning levels on your compiler. – Peter Apr 1 '16 at 8:43
  • I believe splint can check for this. There may be other compilers or static analysis tools that can as well. – detly Apr 1 '16 at 10:25
  • 6
    Declaring money to use an unsigned type is not a great idea. It may give you a false sense of wealth when you overspend. – Marc van Leeuwen Apr 1 '16 at 12:55
8

You need to use a static analysis tool in your build process to achieve this.

For example, if you run PCLint on your code, it gives this output:

  [Warning 632] Assignment to strong type 'cent_t' in context: arg. no. 1
  [Warning 633] Assignment from a strong type 'dollar_t' in context: arg. no. 1

http://www.gimpel.com/html/strong.htm

  • Good! I'll give it a try. Thanks. – so.very.tired Apr 1 '16 at 16:28
  • Is there a free alternative? :( – so.very.tired Apr 15 '16 at 8:49
  • I am accepting this answer, because after further research, it seems like this is exactly what I was looking for: A static analysis tool that will warn me/raise error whenever I make types errors. – so.very.tired Apr 15 '16 at 8:58
30

The problem is that C doesn't treat your two typedefs as distinctive types, because they are both type unsigned.

There are various tricks to dodge this. One thing would be to change your types to enums. Good compilers will enforce stronger typing warnings on implicit conversions to/from a certain enum type to any other type.

Even if you don't have a good compiler, with enums you could do this:

typedef enum { FOO_CENT  } cent_t;
typedef enum { FOO_DOLLAR} dollar_t;

#define DOLLAR_2_CENT(dollar)       ((cent_t)(100*(dollar)))

void calc(cent_t amount) {
    // expecting 'amount' to semantically represents cents...
}

#define type_safe_calc(amount) _Generic(amount, cent_t: calc(amount))

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    dollar_t amount = 50;
    type_safe_calc(DOLLAR_2_CENT(amount));  // ok
    type_safe_calc(amount);         // raise warning

    return 0;
}

A more conventional/traditional trick is to use a generic struct wrapper, where you use a "ticket" enum to mark the type. Example:

typedef struct
{
  type_t type;
  void*  data;
} wrapper_t;

...

cent_t my_2_cents;
wrapper_t wrapper = {CENT_T, &my_2_cents};

...

switch(wrapper.type)
{
  case CENT_T: calc(wrapper.data)
  ...
}

The advantage is that it works with any C version. Disadvantage is code and memory overhead, and that it only allows run-time checks.

  • Are the FOO_CENT and FOO_DOLLAR just dummy values? – so.very.tired Apr 1 '16 at 8:54
  • Structs are out of the question (like you said, there are memory and code penalties, and I can't afford that...) – so.very.tired Apr 1 '16 at 8:55
  • @so.very.tired Yeah it is just nonsense dummies. You can use an enum to store any integer values, though how large the enum actually is depends on the compiler. – Lundin Apr 1 '16 at 8:57
  • Your first example could be perfect for me, but are you sure it should raise warning? I tried to compile it with gcc -Wall but the compiler didn't show any warnings... – so.very.tired Apr 1 '16 at 9:28
  • 4
    @so.very.tired How exactly do you expect there to be memory and code penalties for a struct cents { unsigned count; }? A two-element struct that stores the type in a runtime field can have penalties; I would be surprised if a struct containing just a single unsigned value has any. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Apr 1 '16 at 13:48
10

Aliasing has a very specific narrow meaning in C, and it's not what you have in mind. You may want to say "typedefing".

And the answer is no, you can't. Not in an elegant way at any rate. You can use a struct for each numeric type, and a separate set of functions to do arithmetic with each one. Except when it comes to multiplication, you are out of luck. In order to multiply feet by pounds, you need a third type. You also need types for feet squared, feet cubed, seconds to the power of minus two and an infinite number of other types.

If this is what you are after, C is not the right language.

5

EDIT: Here an alternative that works even in C89, in case your compiler doesn't support _Generic selector's (a lot of compilers don't and often you're stuck with what's installed on your machine).

You can use macros to simplify the use of struct wrappers.

#define NEWTYPE(nty,oty) typedef struct { oty v; } nty
#define FROM_NT(ntv)       ((ntv).v)
#define TO_NT(nty,val)     ((nty){(val)})  /* or better ((nty){ .v=(val)}) if C99 */


NEWTYPE(cent_t, unsigned);
NEWTYPE(dollar_t, unsigned);

#define DOLLAR_2_CENT(dollar)       (TO_NT(cent_t, 100*FROM_NT(dollar)))

void calc(cent_t amount) {
     // expecting 'amount' to semantically represents cents...
}  

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    dollar_t amount = TO_NT(dollar_t, 50);  // or alternatively {50};
    calc(DOLLAR_2_CENT(amount));  // ok
    calc(amount);                 // raise warning
    return 0;
}

You get even stronger than a warning. Here is the compilation result with gcc 5.1

$ gcc -O3  -Wall Edit1.c
Edit1.c: In function ‘main’:
Edit1.c:17:10: error: incompatible type for argument 1 of ‘calc’
     calc(amount);                 // raise warning
          ^
Edit1.c:10:6: note: expected ‘cent_t {aka struct }’ but argument is of type ‘dollar_t {aka struct }’
 void calc(cent_t amount);// {

and here the result with gcc 3.4

$ gcc -O3  -Wall Edit1.c
Edit1.c: In function 'main':
Edit1.c:17: error: incompatible type for argument 1 of 'calc'
  • C89 doesn't have designated initializers, third line of your example wouldn't compile. – Leandros Apr 1 '16 at 15:26
  • Did you try this with -std=c89 – cat Apr 1 '16 at 17:33
  • Yes. it compiled without warning. May be I should have tried -pedantic. – Patrick Schlüter Apr 4 '16 at 7:10
  • Is (TO_NT (cent_t, 100 * FROM_NT (dollar))) really preferable to ( (cent_t) { 100 * (dollar).v } )? – PJTraill Apr 6 '16 at 22:55
  • Not really, but that's what one has to do to use struct container to have strong type check in C. Is it that useful in practice? I don't think it is, but that's what the OP wanted to do. So I proposed an alternative to the accepted answer, that's all. As always Caveat emptor. – Patrick Schlüter Apr 7 '16 at 7:34

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