22

This was an exam question which I couldn't complete.

How do you get the following java code to print false by only editing code within the MyClass constructor?

public class MyClass{        
    public MyClass(){
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {            
        MyClass m = new MyClass();
        System.out.println(m.equals(m));
    }
}

You are NOT allowed to override the equals method, or change any of the code within the main method. The code must run without the program crashing.

According to my research, you can't set a Java object reference to null when you instantiate a class. So I'm officially stumped.

7
  • 13
    System.out.println(false); ;)
    – Reimeus
    Apr 1 '16 at 20:51
  • Well, what is the equals() method?
    – RaminS
    Apr 1 '16 at 20:51
  • I think this is a puzzle in Java Puzzlers. I've definitely seen it before. Apr 1 '16 at 20:58
  • 4
    @vk239 The comments under your deleted answer were wrong. You didn't override equals you overloaded it. Apr 1 '16 at 21:02
  • 3
    @PaulBoddington That's a fair point, although it does still say "by only editing code within the MyClass constructor".
    – arshajii
    Apr 1 '16 at 21:04
18

That was tough!!

public MyClass() {
    System.setOut(new PrintStream(new FilterOutputStream(System.out) {
        @Override
        public void write(byte[] b, int off, int len) throws IOException {
            if(new String(b).contains("true")) {
                byte[] text = "false".getBytes();         
                super.write(text, 0, text.length);
            }
            else {
                super.write(b, off, len);
            }
        }
    }, true));
}

Or Paul Boddington's simplified version:

PrintStream p = System.out; 
System.setOut(new PrintStream(p) { 
    @Override
    public void println(boolean b) { 
        p.println(false); 
    }
});

Or AJ Neufeld's even more simple suggestion:

System.setOut(new PrintStream(System.out) { 
    @Override
    public void println(boolean b) { 
        super.println(false); 
    }
});
6
  • 2
    @JohnnyWiller I feel clever which is always a sign that I'm overcomplicating things lol
    – flakes
    Apr 1 '16 at 21:20
  • 2
    Damn you beat me by a few minutes! You can simplify this a bit. It can just be final PrintStream p = System.out; System.setOut(new PrintStream(p) { public void println(boolean b) { p.println(false); }}); Apr 1 '16 at 21:25
  • 1
    Great answer - I've upvoted. You beat me because I was not aware of setOut. I was trying to use field.set which doesn't seem to work. Apr 1 '16 at 21:32
  • 1
    PrintStream was the one I was working on. Beat me to it. Not quite as clean, but you could just print "false" and then raise an exception to prevent the second line of the main method from being called. It does mean you get a stack trace after false, but it didn't say you had to exit cleanly ;-)
    – ManoDestra
    Apr 1 '16 at 21:38
  • 3
    @flkes Further shortening it: System.setOut(new PrintStream(System.out) { @Override public void println(boolean b) { super.println(false); } }); No need for a p variable.
    – AJNeufeld
    Apr 1 '16 at 21:39
14

Something along these lines, I would guess:

public MyClass() {
    System.out.println(false);
    System.exit(0);
}

EDIT: I found a puzzle very similar to yours in Java Puzzlers, except in that question the only restriction was that you could not override equals, which basically makes the solution to overload it instead and simply return false. Incidentally, my solution above was also given as an alternative answer to that puzzle.

1
  • 3
    If that was the answer the exam was looking for, it is a bad exam.
    – Raedwald
    Apr 2 '16 at 12:50
4

Another solution is

public MyClass() {
    new PrintStream(new ByteArrayOutputStream()).println(true);
    try {
        Field f = String.class.getDeclaredField("value");
        f.setAccessible(true);
        f.set("true", f.get("false"));
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
}

The first line is needed because it is necessary for the string literal "true" to be encountered in the PrintStream class before the backing array is modified. See this question.

3
  • You must be loading some static code when you call println(boolean b). very interesting
    – flakes
    Apr 2 '16 at 1:32
  • Looks like you need to get Java to intern() the String("true") into the pool. You can likely get away with doing something like String t = "true" to achieve the same effect. Apr 2 '16 at 9:56
  • 1
    @BorisTheSpider Weirdly it doesn't work. It seems you have to encounter the right "true" literal - i.e. the one in the PrintStream class. See the linked question for the true extent of how strange this all is. Apr 2 '16 at 10:25
1

This is my solution

public class MyClass {

    public MyClass() {
        System.out.println("false");

        // New class
        class NewPrintStream extends PrintStream {
            public NewPrintStream(OutputStream out) {
                super(out);
            }

            @Override
            public void println(boolean b) {
                // Do nothing
            }
        }

        NewPrintStream nps = new NewPrintStream(System.out);
        System.setOut(nps);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyClass m = new MyClass();
        System.out.println(m.equals(m));
    }
}

Basically, this is the variation of @fikes solution.

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