9

This question already has an answer here:

I am trying to count all the lines in a txt file, I am using the StreamReader:

public int countLines(string path)
{
    var watch = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();
    int nlines=0;
    string line;
    StreamReader file = new StreamReader(path);
    while ((line = file.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        nlines++;
    }
    watch.Stop();
    var elapsedMs = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    Console.Write(elapsedMs)
    // elapsedMs = 3520  --- Tested with a 1.2 Mill txt
    return nlines;
}

Is there a more efficient way to count the number of lines?

marked as duplicate by zneak, D Stanley c# Apr 2 '16 at 1:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    This already is the best method. How long does it take? – Camo Apr 1 '16 at 23:30
  • 4
    To avoid allocating and then throwing away a whole bunch of strings, it might be more efficient to call file.Read() and count the number of carriage-return and/or linefeed characters. – Michael Liu Apr 1 '16 at 23:31
  • 3
    If you don't need the filecontents (other than the number of lines) you could remove the string line variable and just do while (file.ReadLine() != null) nlines++; – derpirscher Apr 1 '16 at 23:32
  • 1
    @derpirscher While perhaps more clear of intent, it will have absolutely no bearing on the final speed. – user2864740 Apr 1 '16 at 23:35
  • 1
    Your code essentially counts the number of times that a pointer advances to the next 0×0A (since that also covers 0×0c and 0×0A combinations). Run it as a raw pointer advancement while incrementing count and see if that improves efficiency over the StreamReader overhead. I'm rusty on this so I'm inviting review. – user4039065 Apr 1 '16 at 23:47
8

I'm just thinking out loud here, but chances are performance is I/O bound and not CPU bound. In any case, I'm wondering if interpreting the file as text may be slowing things down as it will have to convert between the file's encoding and string's native encoding. If you know the encoding is ASCII or compatible with ASCII, you might be able to get away with just counting the number of times a byte with the value 10 appears (which is the character code for a linefeed).

What if you had the following:

FileStream fs = new FileStream("path.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None, 1024 * 1024);

long lineCount = 0;
byte[] buffer = new byte[1024 * 1024];
int bytesRead;

do
{
    bytesRead = fs.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
    for (int i = 0; i < bytesRead; i++)
        if (buffer[i] == '\n')
            lineCount++;
}
while (bytesRead > 0);

My benchmark results for 1.5GB text file, timed 10 times, averaged:

  • StreamReader approach, 4.69 seconds
  • File.ReadLines().Count() approach, 4.54 seconds
  • FileStream approach, 1.46 seconds
  • 3
    Can you use char as a variable name as it is a C# reserved keyword, perhaps @byte or currentByte would be better? You may also find reading a buffer of bytes to be more performant. Either way, +1 for avoiding those unnecessary string allocations. – Lukazoid Apr 1 '16 at 23:59
  • 2
    @dreamlax you are assuming the new line is represented as LF (\n) (10) or CRLF (\r\n). What about in the case where the new line is defined as carriage return \r (13)? – user5766999 Apr 2 '16 at 0:09
  • 1
    I generated a file with 1M lines that all read "This is line #n". With the OP's method, it counted 1M in 124ms. With the ReadByte method, it took 220ms. I stored the comparison value with int newline = (int)Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(Environment.NewLine)[0]; Just wanted to toss my results out there. – Chris Fannin Apr 2 '16 at 0:27
  • 2
    I have updated my post, I am getting a very different result :-) – MaYaN Apr 2 '16 at 1:25
  • 1
    Upvoted. With citiesTour_400.txt, I got SR 3.754s and FS 2.751s. I'm certain it would go faster if I optimized release and possibly disable my antivirus. :-) – Chris Fannin Apr 2 '16 at 1:46
4

You already have the appropriate solution but you can simplify all your code to:

var lineCount = File.ReadLines(@"C:\MyHugeFile.txt").Count();

Benchmarks

I am not sure how dreamlax achieved his benchmark results but here is something so that anyone can reproduce on their machine; you can just copy-paste into LINQPad.

First let us prepare our input file:

var filePath = @"c:\MyHugeFile.txt";

for (int counter = 0; counter < 5; counter++)
{
    var lines = new string[30000000];

    for (int i = 0; i < lines.Length; i++)
    {
        lines[i] = $"This is a line with a value of: {i}";
    }

    File.AppendAllLines(filePath, lines);
}

This should produce a 150 million lines file which is roughly 6 GB.

Now let us run each method:

void Main()
{
    var filePath = @"c:\MyHugeFile.txt";
    // Make sure you clear windows cache!
    UsingFileStream(filePath);

    // Make sure you clear windows cache!
    UsingStreamReaderLinq(filePath);

    // Make sure you clear windows cache!
    UsingStreamReader(filePath);
}

private void UsingFileStream(string path)
{
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    using (var fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        long lineCount = 0;
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024 * 1024];
        int bytesRead;

        do
        {
            bytesRead = fs.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            for (int i = 0; i < bytesRead; i++)
                if (buffer[i] == '\n')
                    lineCount++;
        }
        while (bytesRead > 0);       
        Console.WriteLine("[FileStream] - Read: {0:n0} in {1}", lineCount, sw.Elapsed);
    }
}

private void UsingStreamReaderLinq(string path)
{
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    var lineCount = File.ReadLines(path).Count();
    Console.WriteLine("[StreamReader+LINQ] - Read: {0:n0} in {1}", lineCount, sw.Elapsed);
}

private void UsingStreamReader(string path)
{
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    long lineCount = 0;
    string line;
    using (var file = new StreamReader(path))
    {
        while ((line = file.ReadLine()) != null) { lineCount++; }
        Console.WriteLine("[StreamReader] - Read: {0:n0} in {1}", lineCount, sw.Elapsed);
    }
}

Which results in:

[FileStream] - Read: 150,000,000 in 00:00:37.3397443

[StreamReader+LINQ] - Read: 150,000,000 in 00:00:33.8842190

[StreamReader] - Read: 150,000,000 in 00:00:34.2102178

Update

Running with optimization ON results in:

[FileStream] - Read: 150,000,000 in 00:00:18.1636374

[StreamReader+LINQ] - Read: 150,000,000 in 00:00:33.3173354

[StreamReader] - Read: 150,000,000 in 00:00:32.3530890

  • 4
    @dreamlax It won't! you are confusing ReadLines with ReadAllLines the former returns an IEnumerable<string>. Refer to: stackoverflow.com/questions/119559/… – MaYaN Apr 1 '16 at 23:42
  • 2
    A little bit slower than StreamReader way (3619 Milliseconds) But thanks anyway :) – Brayan Henao Apr 1 '16 at 23:52
  • 3
    @Brayan, benchmarking IO is not as simple as running the code twice and comparing the results. Specially when you are dealing with a disk. At the minimum you need to clear the content of Windows Cached files then run them multiple times and take the average. You can use RAMMap to clear the cache, more info: stackoverflow.com/questions/478340/… – MaYaN Apr 2 '16 at 0:17
  • 2
    @dreamlax, I just updated the result this time with optimization ON and your method was almost 2x faster :-) my only objection is the lack of support for carriage return (\r) – MaYaN Apr 2 '16 at 1:42
  • 1
    @MaYaN: Indeed, your answer is much safer. For files with mixed line endings mine may give a different result. I deal a lot with PostScript files and it's common to see mixed line endings there (embedded files may have one line ending while the overall PostScript file may have another). I also deal a lot with Macs (particular older ones) and from time to time I do encounter a file with \r line endings but it is rare (and getting rarer). – dreamlax Apr 2 '16 at 1:53

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