169

I need to do something like:

if (condition) {
    import something from 'something';
}
// ...
if (something) {
    something.doStuff();
}

The above code does not compile; it throws SyntaxError: ... 'import' and 'export' may only appear at the top level.

I tried using System.import as shown here, but I don't know where System comes from. Is it an ES6 proposal that didn't end up being accepted? The link to "programmatic API" from that article dumps me to a deprecated docs page.

  • Just import it normally. Your module needs it regardless. – Andy Apr 1 '16 at 23:47
  • I don't really see any reason why you wouldn't just import regardless of the condition. It's not like there's some sort of overhead. In some scenario you need the file, so it's not like there's ever a case where it can be entirely skipped. In that case, just import it unconditionally. – Thank you Apr 2 '16 at 2:40
  • 8
    My use case: I want to make it easy to have an optional dependency. If the dep is not needed, the user removes it from package.json; my gulpfile then checks if that dependency exists before performing some build steps. – ericsoco Apr 4 '16 at 16:16
  • 1
    Another use case: for testing purposes. I am using webpack and babel to transpile es6 to es5. Projects like webpack-rewire and similar are not to help here - github.com/jhnns/rewire-webpack/issues/12 . One way to set the test doubles OR to remove problematic dependencies could be the conditional import. – Amio.io Sep 5 '16 at 6:58
  • 3
    +1. Being able to use a module in multiple environments where dependencies may or may not work is critical, particularly when modules may refer to dependencies that would only work in the browser (e.g. where webpack is used to convert stylesheets into modules that insert the relevant styles into the DOM when they're imported) but the module also needs to run outside of the browser (e.g. for unit testing). – Jules Jun 30 '17 at 9:22
116

We do have dynamic imports proposal now with ECMA. This is in stage 3. This is also available as babel-preset.

Following is way to do conditional rendering as per your case.

if (condition) {
    import('something')
    .then((something) => {
       console.log(something.something);
    });
}

This basically returns a promise. Resolution of promise is expected to have the module. The proposal also have other features like multiple dynamic imports, default imports, js file import etc. You can find more information about dynamic imports here.

  • 11
    Finally, a real, ES6 answer! Thanks @thecodejack. Actually at stage 3 as of this writing, according to that article now. – ericsoco Oct 9 '17 at 4:37
  • 5
    or if you have just named exports you can destructure: if (condition) { import('something') .then(({ somethingExported }) => { console.log(somethingExported); }); } – ivn Mar 23 '18 at 14:56
  • 3
    on Firefox and while running npm run build I still get the error: SyntaxError: ... 'import' and 'export' may only appear at the top level – ste May 30 '18 at 7:27
  • this fails in testing tho, anyone have ideas? – stackjlei Apr 11 at 16:51
  • 1
    That conditional dynamic import function doesn't have the fine grained ability to import only particular elements that "import X from Y" has. In fact that fine grained ability could be even more important in dynamic loading (as opposed to preprocess bundling) – Craig Hicks Jul 22 at 16:13
89

If you'd like, you could use require. This is a way to have a conditional require statement.

let something = null;
let other = null;

if (condition) {
    something = require('something');
    other = require('something').other;
}
if (something && other) {
    something.doStuff();
    other.doOtherStuff();
}
  • 1
    I think something and other variables are declsred using const which is block scoped, so the second if condition will throw that something is not defined – Mohammed Essehemy Apr 9 '18 at 12:49
  • Thanks @MohammedEssehemy , I've edited my answer – BaptWaels Apr 10 '18 at 10:02
  • Would be better to use let and declare the two variables outside the block instead of using 'var' and avoiding the block scope altogether. – Vorcan Apr 12 '18 at 7:12
  • Does hoisting affect anything in this case? I've run into some problems where hoisting has meant that I've unanticipatedly imported a library when following a pattern close to this if memory serves. – Thomas Oct 11 '18 at 13:18
  • 5
    It needs to be pointed out that require() is not part of standard JavaScript - it's a built-in function in Node.js, so only useful in that environment. The OP gives no indication of working with Node.js. – Velojet May 16 at 22:37
43

You can't import conditionally, but you can do the opposite: export something conditionally. It depends on your use case, so this work around might not be for you.

You can do:

api.js

import mockAPI from './mockAPI'
import realAPI from './realAPI'

const exportedAPI = shouldUseMock ? mockAPI : realAPI
export default exportedAPI

apiConsumer.js

import API from './api'
...

I use that to mock analytics libs like mixpanel, etc... because I can't have multiple builds or our frontend currently. Not the most elegant, but works. I just have a few 'if' here and there depending on the environment because in the case of mixpanel, it needs initialization.

  • 29
    This solution causes unwanted modules be loaded, so not an optimal solution, I think. – ismailarilik Nov 11 '17 at 7:24
  • 3
    As stated in the answer, this is a work-around. At that time, there was simply no solution. ES6 imports are not dynamic, this is by design. The ES6 dynamic import function proposal, which is described in the currently accepted answer, can do it. JS is evolving :) – Kev Nov 12 '17 at 9:33
9

Looks like the answer is that, as of now, you can't.

http://exploringjs.com/es6/ch_modules.html#sec_module-loader-api

I think the intent is to enable static analysis as much as possible, and conditionally imported modules break that. Also worth mentioning -- I'm using Babel, and I'm guessing that System is not supported by Babel because the module loader API didn't become an ES6 standard.

3

require() is a way to import some module on the run time and it equally qualifies for static analysis like import if used with string literal paths. This is required by bundler to pick dependencies for the bundle.

const defaultOne = require('path/to/component').default;
const NamedOne = require('path/to/component').theName;

For dynamic module resolution with complete static analysis support, first index modules in an indexer(index.js) and import indexer in host module.

// index.js
export { default as ModuleOne } from 'path/to/module/one';
export { default as ModuleTwo } from 'path/to/module/two';
export { SomeNamedModule } from 'path/to/named/module';

// host.js
import * as indexer from 'index';
const moduleName = 'ModuleOne';
const Module = require(indexer[moduleName]);
  • 5
    It needs to be pointed out that require() is not part of standard JavaScript - it's a built-in function in Node.js, so only useful in that environment. The OP gives no indication of working with Node.js. – Velojet May 16 at 22:38
0

obscuring it in an eval worked for me, hiding it from the static analyzer ...

if (typeof __CLI__ !== 'undefined') {
  eval("require('fs');")
}
  • 3
    May anybody explain why this answer was downvoted? Is there any real drawbacks or it was just automatic negative reaction to evil keyword 'eval'? – Yuri Gor Feb 13 at 7:41
  • 3
    Automatic downvote for using the hideous eval keyword. Stay away. – Tormod Haugene Feb 25 at 16:29
  • 1
    Can you explain what is actually wrong with the use of eval here, @TormodHaugene? – Adam Barnes Apr 23 at 11:54
  • MDN sums up quite a few reasons why eval should not be used. In general: if you find the need to use eval, you are probably doing it wrong and should take a step back to consider your alternatives. There are probably some scenarios where using eval is correct, but you most likely have not encountered one of those situations. – Tormod Haugene Apr 23 at 13:21
  • 5
    It needs to be pointed out that require() is not part of standard JavaScript - it's a built-in function in Node.js, so only useful in that environment. The OP gives no indication of working with Node.js. – Velojet May 16 at 22:39
0

I was able to achieve this using an immediately-invoked function and require statement.

const something = (() => (
  condition ? require('something') : null
))();

if(something) {
  something.doStuff();
}
  • 3
    It needs to be pointed out that require() is not part of standard JavaScript - it's a built-in function in Node.js, so only useful in that environment. The OP gives no indication of working with Node.js. – Velojet May 16 at 22:39
0

Conditional imports could also be achieved with a ternary and require()s:

const logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

This example was taken from the ES Lint global-require docs: https://eslint.org/docs/rules/global-require

  • 4
    It needs to be pointed out that require() is not part of standard JavaScript - it's a built-in function in Node.js, so only useful in that environment. The OP gives no indication of working with Node.js. – Velojet May 16 at 22:39
0

Look at this example for clear understanding of how dynamic import works.

Dynamic Module Imports Example

To have Basic Understanding of importing and exporting Modules.

JavaScript modules Github

Javascript Modules MDN

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