I've recently started to play around with Cassandra. My understanding is that in a Cassandra table you define 2 keys, which can be either single column or composites:

  1. The Partitioning Key: determines how to distribute data across nodes
  2. The Clustering Key: determines in which order the records of a same partitioning key (i.e. within a same node) are written. This is also the order in which the records will be read.

Data from a table will always be sorted in the same order, which is the order of the clustering key column(s). So a table must be designed for a specific query.

But what if I need to perform 2 different queries on the data from a table. What is the best way to solve this when using Cassandra ?

Example Scenario

Let's say I have a simple table containing posts that users have written :

CREATE TABLE posts (
  username varchar,
  creation timestamp,
  content varchar,
  PRIMARY KEY ((username), creation)
);

This table was "designed" to perform the following query, which works very well for me:

SELECT * FROM posts WHERE username='luke' [ORDER BY creation DESC];

Queries

But what if I need to get all posts regardless of the username, in order of time:

Query (1): SELECT * FROM posts ORDER BY creation;

Or get the posts in alphabetical order of the content:

Query (2): SELECT * FROM posts WHERE username='luke' ORDER BY content;

I know that it's not possible given the table I created, but what are the alternatives and best practices to solve this ?

Solution Ideas

Here are a few ideas spawned from my imagination (just to show that at least I tried):

  • Querying with the IN clause to select posts from many users. This could help in Query (1). When using the IN clause, you can fetch globally sorted results if you disable paging. But using the IN clause quickly leads to bad performance when the number of usernames grows.
  • Maintaining full copies of the table for each query, each copy using its own PRIMARY KEY adapted to the query it is trying to serve.
  • Having a main table with a UUID as partitioning key. Then creating smaller copies of the table for each query, which only contain the (key) columns useful for their own sort order, and the UUID for each row of the main table. The smaller tables would serve only as "sorting indexes" to query a list of UUID as result, which can then be fetched using the main table.

I'm new to NoSQL, I would just want to know what is the correct/durable/efficient way of doing this.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question 1:

Depending on your use case I bet you could model this with time buckets, depending on the range of times you're interested in.

You can do this by making the primary key a year,year-month, or year-month-day depending on your use case (or finer time intervals)

The basic idea is that you bucket changes for what suites your use case. For example:

  • If you often need to search these posts over months in the past, then you may want to use the year as the PK.
  • If you usually need to search the posts over several days in the past, then you may want to use a year-month as the PK.
  • If you usually need to search the post for yesterday or a couple of days, then you may want to use a year-month-day as your PK.

I'll give a fleshed out example with yyyy-mm-dd as the PK:

The table will now be:

CREATE TABLE posts_by_creation (
  creation_year int,
  creation_month int,
  creation_day int,
  creation timeuuid,
  username text,  -- using text instead of varchar, they're essentially the same
  content text,
  PRIMARY KEY ((creation_year,creation_month,creation_day), creation)
)

I changed creation to be a timeuuid to guarantee a unique row for each post creation event. If we used just a timestamp you could theoretically overwrite an existing post creation record in here.

Now we can then insert the Partition Key (PK): creation_year, creation_month, creation_day based on the current creation time:

INSERT INTO posts_by_creation (creation_year, creation_month, creation_day, creation, username, content) VALUES (2016, 4, 2, now() , 'fromanator', 'content update1';
INSERT INTO posts_by_creation (creation_year, creation_month, creation_day, creation, username, content) VALUES (2016, 4, 2, now() , 'fromanator', 'content update2';

now() is a CQL function to generate a timeUUID, you would probably want to generate this in the application instead, and parse out the yyyy-mm-dd for the PK and then insert the timeUUID in the clustered column.

For a usage case using this table, let's say you wanted to see all of the changes today, your CQL would look like:

SELECT * FROM posts_by_creation WHERE creation_year = 2016 AND creation_month = 4 AND creation_day = 2;

Or if you wanted to find all of the changes today after 5pm central:

SELECT * FROM posts_by_creation WHERE creation_year = 2016 AND creation_month = 4 AND creation_day = 2 AND creation >= minTimeuuid('2016-04-02 5:00-0600') ;

minTimeuuid() is another cql function, it will create the smallest possible timeUUID for the given time, this will guarantee that you get all of the changes from that time.

Depending on the time spans you may need to query a few different partition keys, but it shouldn't be that hard to implement. Also you would want to change your creation column to a timeuuid for your other table.

Question 2:

You'll have to create another table or use materialized views to support this new query pattern, just like you thought.

Lastly if your not on Cassandra 3.x+ or don't want to use materialized views you can use Atomic batches to ensure data consistency across your several de-normalized tables (that's what it was designed for). So in your case it would be a BATCH statement with 3 inserts of the same data to 3 different tables that support your query patterns.

  • I like madooc's explicit setting of the date-time components as a composite primary key, it's much more clear as to how you split the data across your cluster. – fromanator Apr 4 '16 at 20:04

The SELECT * FROM posts ORDER BY creation; will results in a full cluster scan because you do not provide any partition key. And the ORDER BY clause in this query won't work anyway.

Your requirement I need to get all posts regardless of the username, in order of time is very hard to achieve in a distributed system, it supposes to:

  1. fetch all user posts and move them to a single node (coordinator)
  2. order them by date
  3. take top N latest posts

Point 1. require a full table scan. Indeed as long as you don't fetch all records, the ordering can not be achieve. Unless you use Cassandra clustering column to order at insertion time. But in this case, it means that all posts are being stored in the same partition and this partition will grow forever ...

Query SELECT * FROM posts WHERE username='luke' ORDER BY content; is possible using a denormalized table or with the new materialized view feature (http://www.doanduyhai.com/blog/?p=1930)

The solution is to create another tables to support your queries.

For SELECT * FROM posts ORDER BY creation;, you may need some special column for grouping it, maybe by month and year, e.g. PRIMARY KEY((year, month), timestamp) this way the cassandra will have a better performance on read because it doesn't need to scan the whole cluster to get all data, it will also save the data transfer between nodes too.

Same as SELECT * FROM posts WHERE username='luke' ORDER BY content;, you must create another table for this query too. All column may be same as your first table but with the different Primary Key, because you cannot order by the column that is not the clustering column.

  • In your data model I like the explicit setting of the time bucketing with a composite primary key over a timestamp like I used. Makes it much more clear on how your data is organized across the cluster. – fromanator Apr 4 '16 at 20:02
  • Thanks @fromanator :) – madooc Apr 4 '16 at 23:56

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