7

Is there a way to say something like:

sizeof(type)? Or type.Size?

Right now I am looking at using code like:

if (type.Equals(typeof(int)))
    return sizeof(int);
else if (type.Equals(typeof(long)))
    return sizeof(long);

etc, etc, for every single data type.

There must be an cleaner solution, no?

2
  • Can you explain a reason behind what you wanna do?
    – leppie
    Dec 12 '08 at 18:43
  • Thats funny, I almost posted this exact question yesterday, but didn't have time. I need the exact same thing for using ADO.NET DbParameters. Sometimes it forces you to set DbParameter.Size, which is the size of the object in bytes. I too had a big switch statement like the one you originally posted :) Dec 12 '08 at 19:09
12

Try Marshal.SizeOf()

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/5s4920fa.aspx

7
  • This looks like it gets the size, in memory, of a specific object or value, which isn't necessarily the same as the size of a type. Dec 12 '08 at 18:46
  • There is also a type overload. I mistakenly linked to the Object version. Will update shortly
    – JaredPar
    Dec 12 '08 at 18:48
  • Still, from the doc: "The size returned is the actually the size of the unmanaged type. The unmanaged and managed sizes of an object can differ. For character types, the size is affected by the CharSet value applied to that class." Depending on what the use case is, it could be misleading. Dec 12 '08 at 18:55
  • 1
    It returns a different value for bool too: bool boolean = true; Type type = boolean.GetType(); Console.WriteLine(sizeof(bool)); Console.WriteLine(Marshal.SizeOf(type)); The first line will output "1", the second will output "4".
    – archimedes
    Dec 12 '08 at 19:07
  • 2
    Link to a blog post I wrote on this subject: blogs.msdn.com/jaredpar/archive/2008/10/14/…
    – JaredPar
    Dec 12 '08 at 19:45
1

If this is for data access, you can do type.GetTypeCode() (which is a member of IConvertible), which gives you a nice enum to switch on.

1

Look at these questions:

In particular, read the answers left by Jon Skeet.

-4

Maybe you can go Convert.ToString(type.MaxValue, 2).Length / 8 ?

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