72

In my Angular 2 app, I have two services that depend on each other (service A calling methods from service B and vice versa).

Here are the relevant code:

app.component.ts:

import {Component} from 'angular2/core';
import {TempService} from '../services/tmp';
import {Temp2Service} from '../services/tmp2';

@Component({
    selector: 'my-app',
    templateUrl: 'app/app/app.component.html',
    providers: [TempService, Temp2Service]
})
export class AppComponent { (...) }

Service 1:

import {Injectable} from 'angular2/core';
import {Temp2Service} from './tmp2';

@Injectable()
export class TempService {
  constructor (private _sessionService: Temp2Service) {}
}

Service 2:

import {Injectable} from 'angular2/core';
import {TempService} from './tmp';

@Injectable()
export class Temp2Service {
  constructor (private _sessionService: TempService) {}
}

Running the app leads to the following error:

EXCEPTION: Cannot resolve all parameters for 'Temp2Service'(undefined). Make sure that all the parameters are decorated with Inject or have valid type annotations and that 'Temp2Service' is decorated with Injectable

When commenting the constructor in one of the services, the app runs fine. So my guess is that the "cross-reference" of the two services is causing the problem.

Do you have an idea what is going wrong here? Or is my approach already wrong?

  • 5
    Well, angular needs a TempService to construct a Temp2Service, and it needs a Temp2Service to construct a TempService. It's a chicken and egg problem. Create a third service, and delegate to this third service to break the dependency. – JB Nizet Apr 2 '16 at 21:16

12 Answers 12

45

This is a called circular dependency. It is not an issue with Angular2 itself. It is not allowed in any language I am aware of.

You will need to refactor your code to remove this circular dependency. Likely you will need to breakup one of these services into new service.

If you follow the single responsibility principle you will find you won't get into circular dependency trap.

| improve this answer | |
  • 88
    Actually, circular dependencies are allowed in all languages I know of. The problem is that the dependencies are needed by the constructor. If they were not, you could do let a = new A(); let b = new B(); a.b = b; b.a = a;. You would still have a circular dependency, but everything would run fine. I'm NOT saying that circular dependencies are a good thing. Just saying that they're possible. – JB Nizet Apr 2 '16 at 21:28
  • 1
    In some cases circular dependency can't be avoided. I found Julian FARHI's answer referencing forward reference useful. Solved my problem. – Chen Xing Apr 10 '17 at 5:39
  • 4
    forwardRef is for circular dependencies of classes within the same file. My answer is about DI dependencies. forwardRef won't have any influence of circular constructor dependencies of injectables. Removing one dependency from the constructor to break the cycle and instead inject Injector and use setTimeout(() => { this.someDep = injector.get(SomeDependency); } would be a way to work around. – Günter Zöchbauer May 23 '17 at 9:55
  • 5
    "In you follow the single responsibly principle you will find you won't get into circular dependency trap." This seems like a false statement. I have a view that can be shown as part of the page, or shown as a modal dialog. My view shows related models, which you can click on to view in a modal dialog. In Angular's eyes, this creates a circular dependency (the modal is not injected into the constructor). The responsibility of the actual view is no different in both scenarios (show the model), but it creates a circular dependency. I appreciate my scenario is different to the question, however. – John Apr 17 '18 at 2:14
  • 5
    You do not need to refactor your code. Just do not use constructor based injection. Use explicit injection. Why is this the top answer? – Charles Robertson Jul 26 '18 at 7:12
32

Constructor injection prevents circular dependencies.

It can be broken up by injecting the Injector and requesting a dependency imperatively like:

private payrollService:PayrollService;
constructor(/*private payrollService:PayrollService*/ injector:Injector) {
  setTimeout(() => this.payrollService = injector.get(PayrollService));
}

See also Circular dependency injection angular 2

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    What do you expect? Constructor injection can't work with circular dependencies. The only good option is to get rid of the circle. – Günter Zöchbauer Mar 27 '17 at 19:39
  • this.payrollService = this.injector.get<ICustomInterface>('PayrollService') should be good enough I think. Not sure if setTimeout... is necessary. – raneshu Mar 28 '17 at 16:29
  • Yes, setTimeout is necessary, otherwise you still have the cycle. – Günter Zöchbauer Mar 28 '17 at 16:30
  • oh ok. I didn't have to add setTimeout to get it to work because I initialized it in a function outside of the constructor. – raneshu Mar 28 '17 at 16:44
  • I get this error even if I place the injector.get call in a method that is NEVER called. Angular CLI - not sure if that makes a difference. – WillyC Apr 7 '17 at 19:29
22

The key here is not to inject the service via the constructor, but instead, use explicit setters & getters. I would use the following pattern in Angular 4:

app.component.ts

import { FooService } from './foo/foo.service';
import { BarService } from './bar/bar.service';

export class AppComponent {

  constructor(public fooService: FooService, public barService: BarService) {

    this.fooService.setBarService(barService);

  }

}

foo.service.ts

@Injectable()
export class FooService {

    barService: any;

    constructor(){
    }

    setBarService(barService: any): void {
        this.barService = barService;
    }

    getBarService(): any {
        return this.barService;
    }

}
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  • 3
    based in the KISS principle, should be considered the right answer – Dimas Crocco Aug 13 '18 at 18:30
  • 2
    @Dimas Crocco Thanks for the comment. I agree. It's good to provide theory, but at the end of the day, the OP wants a concrete example, which I feel I gave him. – Charles Robertson Aug 13 '18 at 20:05
6

I updated this solution to work with Angular > 4. Using Injector class you can inject a service into another service

import { Injector } from '@angular/core';
import { TempService } from './tmp';


@Injectable()
export class Temp2Service {

  private tempService: any;

  constructor (private injector: Injector) { }

  public funcA() {
     this.tempService = this.injector.get(TempService);
     this.tempService.doSomething();
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This does not help in Angular 4.0. – Senthe Dec 7 '17 at 15:17
  • 1
    This is playing with fire - avoid it :) – Alexander Mills Feb 4 '18 at 4:08
  • 1
    @AlexanderMills: why do you say it is playing with fire ? and what better solution do you have ? Thank you. – Andrei Diaconescu Feb 16 '18 at 8:07
  • This is a reasonable solution to an unreasonable problem. – superluminary Oct 25 '18 at 17:26
5

It's a circular dependency and unfortunately it's a fundamental computer science problem, or information problem, something that Angular cannot solve. Try doing something like this instead:

export class ServiceA{
 constructor(private b: ServiceB){
    b.setA(this);
 }
}

export class ServiceB {

 private a: ServiceA

 constructor(){

 }

 setA(a){
   this.a = a;
 }

}

that's probably the best way to do it.

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  • A simple and thus fast solution to an annoying problem. Props. – telion Sep 4 '19 at 13:33
1

We can solve forwordRef function to solve this issue.

//Allows to refer to references which are not yet defined.

@Inject(forwardRef(() => MyService)) private httpProxy: MyService

| improve this answer | |
1

If you are using Angular 2, and need circular dependency for calling functions of each other on some events, you may use Observables and subscribe them in Service in which you injected the other service.

Example:

@Injectable()
class Service1 {

  observeEvents() {
    return Obsevable.create((o) => {
      //store `o` it in any class variable
      //whenever you want to call function of Service2 from this class, do this `o.next('method_name');`
    });
  }
}

@Injectable()
class Service2 {
  constructor(private service1: Service1) {
    this.service1.subscribe((method) => {
      this[method]();
    });
  }
}
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  • I won't downvote because all of these are hacks (thanks, Angular2, for not providing proper decorators) -- but this -- this is a hack. Props to the alternative solution, though. – Cody Jul 13 '17 at 5:48
  • @Cody sir, are hacks not allowed? – Ravinder Payal Jul 19 '17 at 19:45
  • Yes, hacks are allowed -- I think, but I'm not the arbiter on this. I was saying this is a bit of one -- not that Angular is providing much as an alternative. I appreciate the offer of another solution -- I wasn't counting anymore points against you than those against Angular. – Cody Aug 8 '17 at 5:26
  • @Cody seems interesting. Thanks – Ravinder Payal Aug 8 '17 at 5:41
0

Use interfaces - this is a common pattern in many languages.

See Günters answer

Circular dependency with Angular 2 and SystemJS

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0

Everything I tried to fix circular dependency warning with setTimeout or use of injector and moving the injection from constructor into another function didn't work for me with angular 7.

Here is my working solution:

I created another service just to hold the service referenz to first service:

@Injectable()
export class AnotherService {

  private _service: AService;

  get service(): AService {
    return this._service;
  }
  set service(service: AService) {
    this._service = service;
  }
}

Then I can use it like this:

@Injectable()
export class AService {

  constructor(private anotherService: AnotherService) {
    anotherService.service = this;
  }
  ...
}

and here:

@Injectable()
export class BService {
  private aService: AService;

  constructor(private injector: Injector) {
    const anotherService = injector.get(AnotherService);
    this.aService = anotherService.service;
  }
  ...
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I ran into circular dependency problems, found many answers and the best way I found to solve it is following.

As far as I understood, the problem occurs when you try to pass a: A to b: B into the constructor. So the way to avoid it is to create your object, and then only set a into b

As for me A and B are not so self talking, my example will be with my case which was having

Note that the imports do not influence the circular dependency problem.

rabbit.component.ts

export class RabbitComponent {

    public rabbitsArray: Rabbit[] = []

    constructor(){
        let lRabbit: Rabbit = new Rabbit(God.rabbitMotherFromEve())
        lRabbit.setRabbitComponent(this)
        rabbits.push(lRabbit)
    }
}

rabbit.ts

export class Rabbit {
    public feetsArray: Foot[] // I know its not the best practices but more concise for example
    public rabbitComponent: RabbitComponent

    constructor (anyThingYouWantButRabbitComponent: RabbitMother){
    }
}
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0

I ran into an issue when querying my API. A can have many Bs, B has one A parent. When setting up these models one of these relations need to be left out in order to avoid a circular dependency. Then, when you query you can simply cast the type as any:

this.repositoryService.Query<A>(`$filter=Id eq ${B.AId}`).subscribe(As=>this.importantProp = (As[0] as any).C.property;)

Then in your definition of A:

@JsonProperty('B', [Object], true) Bs = new Array<Object>();
@JsonProperty('C', [Object], true) C = null;
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-1

you can try to call NEW on one of the services if not having a singleton is acceptable. like

this._sessionService = new TempService(this);

This was the approach I took since neither service used undefined member variables.

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  • Good. You mean, if you don't need it to be @Injectable -- if its a very static object/class. – Cody Jul 13 '17 at 5:49
  • 1
    This is a bad idea, as it removes the whole point of DI, such as test ability. – Yahya Uddin Aug 3 '19 at 14:26
  • Agreed with @YahyaUddin. Defeats the whole purpose of injectable services – krummens Apr 20 at 16:19

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