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I'm currently working on a C++ program that has two classes (two that are relevant here). I'm looking for the canonical way (if there is one) to solve the following problem.

There's a Bigger class, which contains a fairly large data buffer (currently a std::vector), and a Smaller class that I would also like to access this data. The data buffer in each Smaller object is a subset of the data in a particular Bigger object, so I'd love to not have to duplicate data, but I would like to be able to access the data easily (and in the same manner) from both. A little code to illustrate:

class Smaller {
    private:
        std::vector<char> data_;
    public:
        std::vector<char> &data() { return data_ };
};

class Bigger {
    private:
        std::vector<char> data_;
        std::vector<Smaller> smallers_;
    public:
        std::vector<char> &data() { return data_ };
};

So something like the above is what I have right now, and the data in Smaller is read/copied independently of the data in Bigger. I started to code up a solution with Smaller having a pointer to the other data, but then that precluded having range data. I've been looking at using iterators to represent ranges within the Bigger buffer, but then I don't have the "clean" vector access via Smaller.

It would be nice if both Bigger.data() and Smaller.data() provided the same interface, while also referencing the same data buffer.

Is this something that makes sense in C++? In C, I could just have the Bigger (struct) have a char[], and have a pointer and length in both Bigger and Smaller for access. I could do something like this, but often the "C" way of doing things isn't the best way in C++.

Is the solution providing an iterator-like interface for both classes? i.e. having the vector in Bigger be completely private, and only exposing data iterators? Would this be a std::pair<std::iterator,std::iterator>, or wrapper of such?

  • Your data() functions returns a copy of the internal data, is this the intended behavior? – Holt Apr 3 '16 at 18:19
  • I thought C++ just kinda made that work efficiently, but I suppose to be correct it should be a reference? Edit incoming, and good catch. – Dan Fego Apr 3 '16 at 18:21
  • It only depends on how you want your method to behave (and what you want to do with the returned vector) - With copy, it would have been easy to provide access to "sub" vector, but if you need a reference, it is much more difficult :/ – Holt Apr 3 '16 at 18:24
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    If you decide to use std::vector you need to operate using iterators to avoid copying. You could consider using ArrayRef of llvm, which have constructors, which create a new object referencing the old data. Another alternative is to use views on the data - then all data() function can return a view. – Jens Munk Apr 3 '16 at 18:26
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    open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3334.html -- And while you're waiting for that to be standardized, there are various libraries which implement something similar, such as LLVM's ArrayRef. Or you could implement it yourself, it's fairly trivial. – Benjamin Lindley Apr 3 '16 at 18:27

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