3

This question already has an answer here:

The Calculator interface has calculate abstract method and ramdom() non-abstract method. I want to use super ramdom() and also Override ramdom() at concrete class CalculatorImpl. My question is why I have to call like that Calculator.super.ramdom() ? Why super.ramdon() don't work?

public interface Calculator {

    double calculate(int a);

    default double ramdom() {
        System.out.println("Calculator ramdom");
        return Math.random();
    }

}

class CalculatorImpl implements Calculator {

    @Override
    public double calculate(int a) {
        // calling super.ramdom() will get [The method ramdom() is undefined for
        // the type Object error]
        return Calculator.super.ramdom() * a;
    }

    @Override
    public double ramdom() {
        System.out.println("CalculatorImpl ramdom");
        return 0;
    }

}

marked as duplicate by Alex Salauyou, Andy Turner java Apr 4 '16 at 7:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2

To answer your exact question: when you use super inside a class ... you are "pointing" to the class it is extending; in this case Object.

But Object does not have a method random that you could be calling.

Therefore you have to make it explicit "where" random is actually coming from.

0

Just remove the override of ramdom in CalculatorImpl. It will implicitly used the default implementation from Calculator.

class CalculatorImpl implements Calculator {

@Override
public double calculate(int a) {
    // calling super.ramdom() will get [The method ramdom() is undefined for
    // the type Object error]
    return Calculator.super.ramdom() * a;
}
/* Remove the Override and the default implementation will be used
@Override
public double ramdom() {
    System.out.println("CalculatorImpl ramdom");
    return 0;
}
*/
}

Keyword super is used to call the inherited class and not the implemented interface. But here you have no inheritance except the implicit Object which does not have a random method

Edit: I might have missunderstood your question. If you want to override and call the default implementation, check the link provided by Sasha Salauyou

  • in fact, removing @Override will not affect anything. It is just an annotation telling compiler you're gonna override some method (so it could check the signature and tell if you're mistaken) – Alex Salauyou Apr 4 '16 at 7:15
  • @Sasha Salauyou I am certainly not talking about the annotation but the whole method, as the code sample shows ;) – ortis Apr 4 '16 at 7:16
  • 1
    I see, but it also has no sense. OP says they need overriden method as well. – Alex Salauyou Apr 4 '16 at 7:17
  • @Sasha Salauyou you're right. I will be editing this post – ortis Apr 4 '16 at 7:20
  • @SashaSalauyou my question is why I have to call explicitly ? I know how to call a default method explicitly – Alice Apr 4 '16 at 15:41

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