3

I'm trying to execute a function, which is not found, UNLESS I save a reference to the function in a seperate variable:

   function updateCheck() {
            if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
                var buildFunc = this.buildObject();
                this.updateBiography().then(function(){
                    buildFunc();
                })
            } 
        };

The buildObject function only executes if I save it before executing this.updateBiography (async function) and execute it via the variable I saved it in (buildFunc). The following does NOT work:

           function updateCheck() {
                if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
                    this.updateBiography().then(function(){
                        this.buildObject();
                    })
                } 
            };

I expose all functions via a service object:

 var service = {
            all: all,
            updateBiography: updateBiography,
            get: get,
            updateCheck: updateCheck,
            isNewVersionNeeded:isNewVersionNeeded,
            buildObject:buildObject
        };
        return service;

When I log the "this" object while Im right before the execution of buildFunc, it logs window/global scope. Why is this and how should I deal with this? I do not want to save all my async methods in a seperate variable only to remember them. How should I deal with this problem and why does it not work?

The entire service:

(function () {
    angular
        .module('biography.services', [])
        .factory('Biography', Biography);

    Biography.$inject = ['$http'];

    function Biography($http) {

        var biographyObject = { } ;

        var service = {
            all: all,
            updateBiography: updateBiography,
            get: get,
            updateCheck: updateCheck,
            isNewVersionNeeded:isNewVersionNeeded,
            buildObject:buildObject
        };
        return service;

        var self = this;
        function updateCheck() {
            if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
                this.updateBiography().then(function(){
                    self.buildObject();
                })
            } 
        };

        function updateBiography() {
            return $http.get("Apicall adress")
                        .then(function (resp) {
                            window.localStorage.setItem('biography', resp.data);
                            window.localStorage.setItem('biographyTimeStamp', Date.now());
                        }, function (err) {
                            console.log('ERR', err);
                        });
        }

        function all() {       
            return biographyObject;
        }

        function get(name) {
            var biography = biographyObject;
            for (var i = 0; i < biography.length; i++) {
                if (biography[i].name === name) {
                    return biography[i];
                }
            }
            return null;
        }


        function buildObject() {
            var temp = JSON.parse(window.localStorage.getItem('biography'));
            biographyObject = temp;
        };

        function isNewVersionNeeded() {
            prevTimeStamp = window.localStorage.getItem('biographyTimeStamp');
            var timeDifference = (Date.now() - prevTimeStamp);
            timeDifference = 700000;
            if (timeDifference < 600000) {
                return false;
            }
            else {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
})();

2 Answers 2

1

The context (different from function scope) of your anonymous function's this is determined when it's invoked, at a later time.

The simple rule is - whatever is to the left of the dot eg myObj.doSomething() allows doSomething to access myObj as this.

function updateCheck() {
    if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
        this.updateBiography().then(function() {

// whichever object has this anonymous function defined/invoked on it will become "this"

            this.buildObject(); 
        })
    }
};

Since you're just passing your function reference, you can just use this

function updateCheck() {
    if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
        this.updateBiography().then(this.buildObject);
    }
};

and if this.buildObject is dependent on the context (uses the this keyword internally), then you can use

function updateCheck() {
    if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
        this.updateBiography().then(this.buildObject.bind(this));
    }
};

this is determined by whatever context (object) the function is invoked on, and it appears that an anonymous function, or a function not referenced through an object defaults to having a window context. the bind function replaces all instances of this with an actual object reference, so it's no longer multi-purpose


same function invoked in different contexts (on different objects)

var obj = {
    a: function () {
        console.log(this);
    }
};
var aReference = obj.a;
aReference(); // logs window, because it's the default "this"
obj.a(); // logs obj
1

The reason is here 'this' refers to callback function.You can't access 'this' inside callback.Hence solution is,

function Biography($http) {
      var self = this;

       function updateCheck() {
                if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
                    this.updateBiography().then(function(){
                        self.buildObject();
                    })
                } 
            };

Using ES6 syntax:

 function updateCheck() {
                    if (this.isNewVersionNeeded()) {
                        this.updateBiography().then(()=>{
                            this.buildObject();
                        })
                    } 
                };
3
  • 1
    Thanks, the ES6 solution works. The other one doesn't (I tried it already). I think it doesn't work because at the point where I do var self = this, it returns undefined. So where in the code should I put it? (edited to show entire service)
    – Kai
    Commented Apr 4, 2016 at 9:14
  • put it inside function Biography(){ var self = this}
    – Ved
    Commented Apr 4, 2016 at 9:18
  • actually, this is dependent on where the anonymous function is defined and what path it's invoked at, if the context isn't explicitly set with call/bind/apply
    – neaumusic
    Commented Apr 4, 2016 at 9:51

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