53

I found two main methods to look if a point belongs inside a polygon. One is using the ray tracing method used here, which is the most recommended answer, the other is using matplotlib path.contains_points (which seems a bit obscure to me). I will have to check lots of points continuously. Does anybody know if any of these two is more recommendable than the other or if there are even better third options?

UPDATE:

I checked the two methods and matplotlib looks much faster.

from time import time
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.path as mpltPath

# regular polygon for testing
lenpoly = 100
polygon = [[np.sin(x)+0.5,np.cos(x)+0.5] for x in np.linspace(0,2*np.pi,lenpoly)[:-1]]

# random points set of points to test 
N = 10000
points = zip(np.random.random(N),np.random.random(N))


# Ray tracing
def ray_tracing_method(x,y,poly):

    n = len(poly)
    inside = False

    p1x,p1y = poly[0]
    for i in range(n+1):
        p2x,p2y = poly[i % n]
        if y > min(p1y,p2y):
            if y <= max(p1y,p2y):
                if x <= max(p1x,p2x):
                    if p1y != p2y:
                        xints = (y-p1y)*(p2x-p1x)/(p2y-p1y)+p1x
                    if p1x == p2x or x <= xints:
                        inside = not inside
        p1x,p1y = p2x,p2y

    return inside

start_time = time()
inside1 = [ray_tracing_method(point[0], point[1], polygon) for point in points]
print "Ray Tracing Elapsed time: " + str(time()-start_time)

# Matplotlib mplPath
start_time = time()
path = mpltPath.Path(polygon)
inside2 = path.contains_points(points)
print "Matplotlib contains_points Elapsed time: " + str(time()-start_time)

which gives,

Ray Tracing Elapsed time: 0.441395998001
Matplotlib contains_points Elapsed time: 0.00994491577148

Same relative difference was obtained one using a triangle instead of the 100 sides polygon. I will also check shapely since it looks a package just devoted to these kind of problems

  • Since matplotlib's implementation is C++ you can probably expect it to be faster. Considering that matplotlib is very widely used and since this is a very fundamental function - it's probably also safe to assume it's working correctly (even though it may seem "obscure"). Last but not least: Why not simply test it? – sebastian Apr 4 '16 at 10:06
  • I updated the question with the test, as you predicted, matplotlib is much faster. I was concerned because matplotlib is not the most famous response in the different places I have looked, and I wanted to know if I was overlooking something (or some better package). Also matplotlib looked to be a big guy for a such a simple question. – Ruben Perez-Carrasco Apr 5 '16 at 13:15
63

You can consider shapely:

from shapely.geometry import Point
from shapely.geometry.polygon import Polygon

point = Point(0.5, 0.5)
polygon = Polygon([(0, 0), (0, 1), (1, 1), (1, 0)])
print(polygon.contains(point))

From the methods you've mentioned I've only used the second, path.contains_points, and it works fine. In any case depending on the precision you need for your test I would suggest creating a numpy bool grid with all nodes inside the polygon to be True (False if not). If you are going to make a test for a lot of points this might be faster (although notice this relies you are making a test within a "pixel" tolerance):

from matplotlib import path
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

first = -3
size  = (3-first)/100
xv,yv = np.meshgrid(np.linspace(-3,3,100),np.linspace(-3,3,100))
p = path.Path([(0,0), (0, 1), (1, 1), (1, 0)])  # square with legs length 1 and bottom left corner at the origin
flags = p.contains_points(np.hstack((xv.flatten()[:,np.newaxis],yv.flatten()[:,np.newaxis])))
grid = np.zeros((101,101),dtype='bool')
grid[((xv.flatten()-first)/size).astype('int'),((yv.flatten()-first)/size).astype('int')] = flags

xi,yi = np.random.randint(-300,300,100)/100,np.random.randint(-300,300,100)/100
vflag = grid[((xi-first)/size).astype('int'),((yi-first)/size).astype('int')]
plt.imshow(grid.T,origin='lower',interpolation='nearest',cmap='binary')
plt.scatter(((xi-first)/size).astype('int'),((yi-first)/size).astype('int'),c=vflag,cmap='Greens',s=90)
plt.show()

, the results is this:

point inside polygon within pixel tolerance

  • 1
    Thanks, for that, for the moment I will stick to the matplotlib since it seems much faster than the custom ray tracing. Nevertheless, I really like the space discretisation answer, I might need it in the future. I will also check shapely since it looks a package devoted to these kind of problems – Ruben Perez-Carrasco Apr 5 '16 at 13:18
  • Happy to help. Best of luck. – armatita Apr 5 '16 at 13:20
11

If speed is what you need and extra dependencies are not a problem, you maybe find numba quite useful (now it is pretty easy to install, on any platform). The classic ray_tracing approach you proposed can be easily ported to numba by using numba @jit decorator and casting the polygon to a numpy array. The code should look like:

@jit(nopython=True)
def ray_tracing(x,y,poly):
    n = len(poly)
    inside = False
    p2x = 0.0
    p2y = 0.0
    xints = 0.0
    p1x,p1y = poly[0]
    for i in range(n+1):
        p2x,p2y = poly[i % n]
        if y > min(p1y,p2y):
            if y <= max(p1y,p2y):
                if x <= max(p1x,p2x):
                    if p1y != p2y:
                        xints = (y-p1y)*(p2x-p1x)/(p2y-p1y)+p1x
                    if p1x == p2x or x <= xints:
                        inside = not inside
        p1x,p1y = p2x,p2y

    return inside

The first execution will take a little longer than any subsequent call:

%%time
polygon=np.array(polygon)
inside1 = [numba_ray_tracing_method(point[0], point[1], polygon) for 
point in points]

CPU times: user 129 ms, sys: 4.08 ms, total: 133 ms
Wall time: 132 ms

Which, after compilation will decrease to:

CPU times: user 18.7 ms, sys: 320 µs, total: 19.1 ms
Wall time: 18.4 ms

If you need speed at the first call of the function you can then pre-compile the code in a module using pycc. Store the function in a src.py like:

from numba import jit
from numba.pycc import CC
cc = CC('nbspatial')


@cc.export('ray_tracing',  'b1(f8, f8, f8[:,:])')
@jit(nopython=True)
def ray_tracing(x,y,poly):
    n = len(poly)
    inside = False
    p2x = 0.0
    p2y = 0.0
    xints = 0.0
    p1x,p1y = poly[0]
    for i in range(n+1):
        p2x,p2y = poly[i % n]
        if y > min(p1y,p2y):
            if y <= max(p1y,p2y):
                if x <= max(p1x,p2x):
                    if p1y != p2y:
                        xints = (y-p1y)*(p2x-p1x)/(p2y-p1y)+p1x
                    if p1x == p2x or x <= xints:
                        inside = not inside
        p1x,p1y = p2x,p2y

    return inside


if __name__ == "__main__":
    cc.compile()

Build it with python src.py and run:

import nbspatial

import numpy as np
lenpoly = 100
polygon = [[np.sin(x)+0.5,np.cos(x)+0.5] for x in 
np.linspace(0,2*np.pi,lenpoly)[:-1]]

# random points set of points to test 
N = 10000
# making a list instead of a generator to help debug
points = zip(np.random.random(N),np.random.random(N))

polygon = np.array(polygon)

%%time
result = [nbspatial.ray_tracing(point[0], point[1], polygon) for point in points]

CPU times: user 20.7 ms, sys: 64 µs, total: 20.8 ms
Wall time: 19.9 ms

In the numba code I used: 'b1(f8, f8, f8[:,:])'

In order to compile with nopython=True, each var needs to be declared before the for loop.

In the prebuild src code the line:

@cc.export('ray_tracing' , 'b1(f8, f8, f8[:,:])')

Is used to declare the function name and its I/O var types, a boolean output b1 and two floats f8 and a two-dimensional array of floats f8[:,:] as input.

7

Your test is good, but it measures only some specific situation: we have one polygon with many vertices, and long array of points to check them within polygon.

Moreover, I suppose that you're measuring not matplotlib-inside-polygon-method vs ray-method, but matplotlib-somehow-optimized-iteration vs simple-list-iteration

Let's make N independent comparisons (N pairs of point and polygon)?

# ... your code...
lenpoly = 100
polygon = [[np.sin(x)+0.5,np.cos(x)+0.5] for x in np.linspace(0,2*np.pi,lenpoly)[:-1]]

M = 10000
start_time = time()
# Ray tracing
for i in range(M):
    x,y = np.random.random(), np.random.random()
    inside1 = ray_tracing_method(x,y, polygon)
print "Ray Tracing Elapsed time: " + str(time()-start_time)

# Matplotlib mplPath
start_time = time()
for i in range(M):
    x,y = np.random.random(), np.random.random()
    inside2 = path.contains_points([[x,y]])
print "Matplotlib contains_points Elapsed time: " + str(time()-start_time)

Result:

Ray Tracing Elapsed time: 0.548588991165
Matplotlib contains_points Elapsed time: 0.103765010834

Matplotlib is still much better, but not 100 times better. Now let's try much simpler polygon...

lenpoly = 5
# ... same code

result:

Ray Tracing Elapsed time: 0.0727779865265
Matplotlib contains_points Elapsed time: 0.105288982391
0

I will just leave it here, just rewrote the code above using numpy, maybe somebody finds it useful:

def ray_tracing_numpy(x,y,poly):
    n = len(poly)
    inside = np.zeros(len(x),np.bool_)
    p2x = 0.0
    p2y = 0.0
    xints = 0.0
    p1x,p1y = poly[0]
    for i in range(n+1):
        p2x,p2y = poly[i % n]
        idx = np.nonzero((y > min(p1y,p2y)) & (y <= max(p1y,p2y)) & (x <= max(p1x,p2x)))[0]
        if p1y != p2y:
            xints = (y[idx]-p1y)*(p2x-p1x)/(p2y-p1y)+p1x
        if p1x == p2x:
            inside[idx] = ~inside[idx]
        else:
            idxx = idx[x[idx] <= xints]
            inside[idxx] = ~inside[idxx]    

        p1x,p1y = p2x,p2y
    return inside    

Wrapped ray_tracing into

def ray_tracing_mult(x,y,poly):
    return [ray_tracing(xi, yi, poly[:-1,:]) for xi,yi in zip(x,y)]

Tested on 100000 points, results:

ray_tracing_mult 0:00:00.850656
ray_tracing_numpy 0:00:00.003769

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