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I am new to python and made a short script to try them out, while doing so I came across and error I've never had for the particular situation before, when I try to define uN as a str inputted by the user I get:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/home/pi/Desktop/Scripts/classTest/classTest1.py", line 14, in <module>
uN = input(str("Username"))
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
 NameError: name 'ben' is not defined

The code is as follows:

class user:
    def __init__(self, usrName, pWord):
        self.usrName = usrName
        self.pWord = pWord

    def createUsrPw(self):
        f = open("usrName.txt", "a")
        f.write(self.usrName)
        f.write("   ")
        f.write(self.pWord)
        f.write("\n")
        f.close()

uN = input(str("Username"))
pW = input(str("Password"))

usr1 = user(uN, pW)

usr1.createUsrPw()

I have used the x = input(str()) syntax a lot before and never had this error, and the error traces back to line 1, so is uN = input(str("Username")) still being considered a part of the class?

when I simplify the code to this it works perfectly:

class user:
    def __init__(self, usrName, pWord):
        self.usrName = usrName
        self.pWord = pWord

    def createUsrPw(self):
        f = open("usrName.txt", "a")
        f.write(usrName)
        f.write("   ")
        f.write(pWord)
        f.write("\n")
        f.close()


usr1 = user("Ben", "testPw")

usr1.createUsrPw()

with the file usrName.txt being appended to include "Ben testPw" as intended.

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  • 1
    This error looks like python-2.x where input() works like eval(). Are you sure it's python 3? – Lafexlos Apr 4 '16 at 13:57
  • You are not using Python 3, you are using Python 2 here. Check your interpreter. – Martijn Pieters Apr 4 '16 at 13:58
  • also why do you need input(str()) input already returns a string, if that was your intention – danidee Apr 4 '16 at 13:59
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    oh wow I feel silly, yes I am, I must have misclicked when opening it. I'm so used to using 3 that I didn't even consider that. – Ben Wordy Apr 4 '16 at 13:59
  • @danidee I was not aware of that, thank you! that was how it was written in the first tutorial I looked at so I assumed that was how it should be. I will remember that in future. – Ben Wordy Apr 4 '16 at 14:00
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You should use raw_input instead of input as you are using Python 2.X. input works in Python 3.

This code would work:

class user:
    def __init__(self, usrName, pWord):
        self.usrName = usrName
        self.pWord = pWord

    def createUsrPw(self):
        f = open("usrName.txt", "a")
        f.write(self.usrName)
        f.write("   ")
        f.write(self.pWord)
        f.write("\n")
        f.close()

uN = raw_input("Username")
pW = raw_input("Password")

usr1 = user(uN, pW)

usr1.createUsrPw()
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  • thank you, yes it was pointed out in the comments of the OP that I was using Python 2 not 3, must have clicked the wrong IDLE, bit embarrassing, I've only ever used Python 3 so I didn't even think to check. I will tick this as the best answer as soon as it'll let me – Ben Wordy Apr 4 '16 at 14:04
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Use raw_input. This looks like a Python 2 error, I don't think you're using Python 3

You also don't need to call str on a string literal. str("asdf") == "asdf"

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