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I've been working on a custom video codec for use on the web. The custom codec will be powered by javascript and the html5 Canvas element.

There are several reasons for me wanting to do this that I will list at the bottom of this question, but first I want to explain what I have done so far and why I am looking for a fast DCT transform.

The main idea behind all video compression is that frames next to eachother share a large amount of similarities. So what I'm doing is I send the first frame compressed as a jpg. Then I send another Jpeg image that is 8 times as wide as the first frame holding the "differences" between the first frame and the next 8 frames after that.

This large Jpeg image holding the "differences" is much easier to compress because it only has the differences.

I've done many experiments with this large jpeg and I found out that when converted to a YCbCr color space the "chroma" channels are almost completely flat, with a few stand out exceptions. In other words there are few parts of the video that change much in the chroma channels, but some of the parts that do change are quite significant.

With this knowledge I looked up how JPEG compression works and saw that among other things it uses the DCT to compress each 8x8 block. This really interested me because I thought what if I could modify this so that it not only compresses "each" 8x8 block, but it also checks to see if the "next" 8x8 block is similar to the first one. If it is close enough then just send the first block and use the same data for both blocks.

This would increase both decoding speed, and improve bit rate transfer because there would be less data to work with.

I thought that this should be a simple task to accomplish. So I tried to build my own "modified" jpeg encoder/decoder. I built the RGB to YCbCr converter, I left "gzip" compression to do the huffman encoding and now the only main part I have left is to do the DCT transforms.

However this has me stuck. I can not find a fast 8 point 1d dct transform. I am looking for this specific transform because according to many articles I've read the 2d 8x8 dct transform can be separated into several 1x8 id transforms. This is the approach many implementations of jpeg use because it's faster to process.

So I figured that with Jpeg being such an old well known standard a fast 8 point 1d dct should just jump out at me, but after weeks of searching I have yet to find one.

I have found many algorithms that use the O(N^2) complexity approach. However that's bewilderingly slow. I have also found algorithms that use the Fast Fourier Transform and I've modifed them to compute the DCT. Such as the one in this link below:

https://www.nayuki.io/page/free-small-fft-in-multiple-languages

In theory this should have the "fast" complexity of O(Nlog2(n)) but when I run it it takes my i7 computer about 12 seconds to encode/decode the "modified" jpeg.

I don't understand why it's so slow? There are other javascript jpeg decoders that can do it much faster, but when I try to look through their source code I can't pull out which part is doing the DCT/IDCT transforms.

https://github.com/notmasteryet/jpgjs

The only thing I can think of is maybe the math behind the DCT has already been precomputed and is being stored in a lookup table or something. However I have looked hard on google and I can't find anything (that I understand at least) that talks about this.

So my question is where can I find/how can I build a fast way to compute an 8 point 1d dct transform for this "modified" jpeg encoder/decoder. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Okay as for why I want to do this, the main reason is I want to have "interactive" video for mobile phones on my website. This can not be done because of things like iOS loading up it's "native" quick time player every time it starts playing a video. Also it's hard to make the transition to another point in time of the video seem "smooth" when you have such little control of how videos are rendered especially on mobile devices.

Thank you again very much for any help that anyone can provide!

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So my question is where can I find/how can I build a fast way to compute an 8 point 1d dct transform for this "modified" jpeg encoder/decoder. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

take a look into the flash-world and the JPEG-encoder there (before it was inegrated into the Engine).
Here for example: http://www.bytearray.org/?p=1089 (sources provided) this code contains a function called fDCTQuant() that does the DCT, first for the rows, then for the columns, and then it quantifies the block (so basically there you have your 8x1 DCT).

So what I'm doing is I send the first frame compressed as a jpg. Then I send another Jpeg image ...

take a look at progressive JPEG. I think some of the things how this works, and how the data-stream is built will sound kind of familiar with this description (not the same, but they both go in related directions. imo)

what if I could modify this so that it not only compresses "each" 8x8 block, but it also checks to see if the "next" 8x8 block is similar to the first one. If it is close enough then just send the first block and use the same data for both blocks.

The expressions "similar" and "close enough" got my attention here. take a look at the usually used quantization-tables. you know, that a change of the value by 1 could easily result in a value-change of 15% brightness (for chroma-channels usually even more) of that point depending on the position in the 8x8-block and therefore the applied quantifier.

calculation with quantifier 40
(may be included in the set even at the lowest compression rates
at lower compression rates some quantifier can go up to 100 and beyond)

change the input by 1 changes the output by 40.
since we are working on 1byte value-range it's a change of 40/255
that is about 15% of the total possible range

So you should be really thoughtful what you call "close enough".


To sum this up: Well a Video-codec based on jpeg that utilizes differences between the frames to reduce the amount of data. That also sounde kind of familiar to me.

Got it: MPEG https://github.com/phoboslab/jsmpeg
*no connection to the referenced codes or the coder

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  • Oh wow, thank you for your fast and detailed response. I am going to start looking through the sources you sent me to see if I can find what I am looking for. Regarding me using the words "similar" and "close" to see if each 8x8 block was the same, I did not mean that I would compare the DCT coefficients of each block, but rather the raw rgb pixel values. Again though thank you for your help! If no one responds with a better answer I will use yours as the selected answer because of how much information you gave.
    – YAHsaves
    Apr 5 '16 at 3:23
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This book shows how the DCT matrix can be factored to Gaussian Normal Form. That would be the fastest way to do a DCT.

http://www.amazon.com/Compressed-Image-File-Formats-JPEG/dp/0201604434/ref=pd_sim_14_1?ie=UTF8&dpID=41XJBED6RCL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR127%2C160_&refRID=1Q0G2H5EFYCQW2TJCCJN

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  • Provided link is dead.
    – flanglet
    Oct 2 '17 at 4:36
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I implemented separable integer 2D DCTs of various sizes (as well as other transforms) here: https://github.com/flanglet/kanzi/tree/master/java/src/kanzi/transform. The code is in Java but really for this kind of algorithm, it is pretty much the same in any language. The most interesting part IMO is the rescaling you do after computing each direction. Depending on your goals (max precision, 16 bit computation, no scaling, ...), you may want to change the scaling factors for each step. Using bigger blocks in areas where the image is very uniform saves bits.

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