80

I am using jupyter-notebooks for python coding. Is there a way to wrap text/code in a jupyter notebook code cell?

Picture provided below.

Text not wrapping

By wrap text means "how text is wrapped in MS-word"

2
  • You could try the answer(s) provided here. If it works out, you could answer your own question so others who search for this know that it still works in jupyter notebooks
    – M.T
    Apr 5, 2016 at 7:42
  • @M.T : these steps are for Ipython notebook. I came across thread like groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/jupyter/AczTdZqStoM but I am unable to find files like ~/.jupyter/custom/custom.js
    – Anuj Gupta
    Apr 7, 2016 at 4:59

8 Answers 8

115

Find your configuration directory via jupyter --config-dir (mine is ~/.jupyter). Then edit or create nbconfig/notebook.json to add the following:

{
  "MarkdownCell": {
    "cm_config": {
      "lineWrapping": true
    }
  },
  "CodeCell": {
    "cm_config": {
      "lineWrapping": true
    }
  }
}

(If you have something else in it, ensure you have valid JSON with no trailing commas after }s.)

Restart Jupyter and reload your notebook.

Source: https://github.com/jupyter/notebook/issues/106

10
  • This approach is not working for me. nbconfig should be a new subdirectory to .jupyter and notebook.json should be a textfile stored in it?
    – J Kelly
    May 15, 2017 at 13:52
  • 1
    This didn't work for me either--until I realized the json file format doesn't like # comments. It's my habit of quoting the source of my edits in config files, such as this post's URL.
    – xtian
    Aug 6, 2017 at 16:14
  • 3
    @ J Kelly. That's correct, you can create the nbconfig with mkdir nbconfig, then nano notebook.json to create an empty file named notebook.json in which you will paste the code.
    – BCArg
    Mar 8, 2018 at 14:28
  • 2
    This works. my notebook config file is located at /home/username/anaconda3/etc/jupyter/nbconfig/notebook.json
    – Jason
    Apr 22, 2019 at 18:49
  • Extensions were not enabled by default on my system. After enabling them using the command jupyter nbextension enable --py widgetsnbextension, it is working fine. For more details
    – gaganso
    Sep 25, 2019 at 3:23
28

In addition to Dan's answer, you can apply line wrapping for all cells (code or markdown) by specifying the top object as Cell. Adding the code below to your ~/.jupyter/nbconfig/notebook.json

{
  "Cell": {
    "cm_config": {
      "lineWrapping": true
    }
  }
}

Ex: This is my cell config

{
  "Cell": {
    "cm_config": {
      "lineNumbers": false,
      "lineWrapping": true
    }
  }
}
2
  • For some reason, this doesn't work for me (under Jupyter version 4.2.0), but Dan's answer does.
    – erobertc
    Oct 16, 2018 at 3:44
  • 1
    @eden, is there a similar option for autowrap width in output cells? Nov 7, 2019 at 14:24
1

Easiest for me was this, straightforward and does not require a pip install:

from textwrap import wrap
long_str = 'I rip wrap unravel when I time travel, with beats in my head'
lines = wrap(long_str, 20) #wrap outputs a list of lines
print('\n'.join(lines))    #so join 'em with newline

#prints: 
#I rip wrap unravel
#when I time travel,
#with beats in my
#head
1
  • This does not concern directly to how Jupyter Notebook wraps any input as in the question context. This does not answer the question.
    – Azhar
    May 27 at 9:40
0

You can do:

Settings > Advanced setting Editor > TextEditor > checkbox enable Line Wrap.

Advanced settings editor

1
  • when the orinal questions was posted, unfortunately back then this want there
    – Anuj Gupta
    Jul 28 at 7:06
0

This may not be as satisfactory of an answer but while working Google Colab, I use the three single quote marks above and below the line of comments. Once quote marks are in place, I can hit return where I see fit.

Original comment:

# Using the number of rows from the original concatenated dataframe and the trimmed dataframe, quantify the percent difference between the number of rows lost

Solution:

''' Using the number of rows from the original concatenated dataframe and the trimmed dataframe, quantify the percent difference between the number of rows lost '''

Here is a screen grab of the solution: enter image description here

1
  • This won't work for the lines of code, moreover the OP never asked for how to split the code in lines using '\' or comments using ''' '''. Rather what he is looking for is to "wrap" the content on the cells automatically. Oct 27, 2021 at 7:31
0

I am working with Jupyter notebook (.ipynb) through VSC Visual Studio Code, and I did find out that setting line/word wrapping could be set as follows:

  1. hit F1
  2. choose Preferences: Open Settings (UI)
  3. start typing in wrap
  4. Editor: Word Wrap Controls how lines should wrap pops up, change to On

It works for code (Python cells). Markdown cells work fine even without changing above setting.

0

Since none of these solutions worked for me, I opted for a different approach and wrote a simple column-wrapping print function that you can use to manually guarantee that the lines of any string will remain in view, for simple output checking scenarios.

def printwr( item, wrapCol=70 ):
    """ wrap printing to column limit """
    posit = 0
    while True:
        # if remaining legnth eq/less than wrapCol, print and rturn
        if len(item[posit:]) <= wrapCol: print(item[posit:]); return
        # else take wrapCol chars from last index
        llim = posit+wrapCol+1
        # if more than one item, drop last contiguous non-space sequence (word)
        lineSpl = item[posit:llim].split(' ')
        segment = ' '.join(lineSpl[:-1]) if len(lineSpl)>1 else lineSpl
        # print segment and increment posit by length segment
        posit += len(segment)+1
        print(segment)

For example, for

exampleStr = "populations tend to cluster in the foothills and periphery of the rugged Hindu Kush range; smaller groups are found in many of the country's interior valleys; in general, the east is more densely settled, while the south is sparsely populated"

printwr(exampleStr) 

produces:

populations tend to cluster in the foothills and periphery of the rugged Hindu Kush range; smaller groups are found in many of the country's interior valleys; in general, the east is more densely settled, while the south is sparsely populated

-3

Shortest Answer Ever

Try adding a ' \ ' in between the lines of code you need to split.

This allows you to split your code over different lines and helps it look prettier.

1
  • This requires user to makes change to code (insert '\'). A better solution (if any) would let the tool (jupyter) handle it.
    – Anuj Gupta
    Oct 25, 2017 at 8:18

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