82

I have some issues trying to wrap my code to be used in unit tests. The issues is this. I Have the interface IHttpHandler:

public interface IHttpHandler
{
    HttpClient client { get; }
}

And the class using it, HttpHandler:

public class HttpHandler : IHttpHandler
{
    public HttpClient client
    {
        get
        {
            return new HttpClient();
        }
    }
}

And then the Connection class, which uses simpleIOC to inject the client implementation:

public class Connection
{
    private IHttpHandler _httpClient;

    public Connection(IHttpHandler httpClient)
    {
        _httpClient = httpClient;
    }
}

And then I have a unit test project which has this class:

private IHttpHandler _httpClient;

[TestMethod]
public void TestMockConnection()
{
    var client = new Connection(_httpClient);

    client.doSomething();  

    // Here I want to somehow create a mock instance of the http client
    // Instead of the real one. How Should I approach this?     

}

Now obviously I will have methods in the Connection class that will retrieve data (JSON) from a my back end. However, I want to write unit tests for this class, and obviously I don't want to write tests against the real back end, rather a mocked one. I Have tried to google a good answer to this without great success. I can and have used Moq to mock before, but never on something like httpClient. How Should I approach this problem?

Thanks in advance.

  • 1
    Exposing a HttpClient in your interface is where the problem is. You are forcing your client to use the HttpClient concrete class. Instead, you should expose an abstraction of the HttpClient. – Mike Eason Apr 5 '16 at 11:32
  • Can you explain it a bit more in depth? How should I build the connection classes constructor because I don't want any dependancies of HttpClient in other classes the use the Connection class. For example I dont want to pass concerete HttpClient in the constructor of Connection because that would make every other class that uses Connection dependant of HttpClient? – tjugg Apr 5 '16 at 11:42
  • Out of interest, what did you google? Apparently mockhttp could use some SEO improvements. – Richard Szalay Apr 5 '16 at 13:15
  • @Mike - as mentioned in my answer, there's really no need to abstract HttpClient. It's perfectly testable as-is. I have numerous projects that have backend-less test suites using this method. – Richard Szalay Apr 5 '16 at 13:18

17 Answers 17

29

Your interface exposes the concrete HttpClient class, therefore any classes that use this interface are tied to it, this means that it cannot be mocked.

HttpClient does not inherit from any interface so you will have to write your own. I suggest a decorator-like pattern:

public interface IHttpHandler
{
    HttpResponseMessage Get(string url);
    HttpResponseMessage Post(string url, HttpContent content);
    Task<HttpResponseMessage> GetAsync(string url);
    Task<HttpResponseMessage> PostAsync(string url, HttpContent content);
}

And your class will look like this:

public class HttpClientHandler : IHttpHandler
{
    private HttpClient _client = new HttpClient();

    public HttpResponseMessage Get(string url)
    {
        return GetAsync(url).Result;
    }

    public HttpResponseMessage Post(string url, HttpContent content)
    {
        return PostAsync(url, content).Result;
    }

    public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> GetAsync(string url)
    {
        return await _client.GetAsync(url);
    }

    public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> PostAsync(string url, HttpContent content)
    {
        return await _client.PostAsync(url, content);
    }
}

The point in all of this is that HttpClientHandler creates its own HttpClient, you could then of course create multiple classes that implement IHttpHandler in different ways.

The main issue with this approach is that you are effectively writing a class that just calls methods in another class, however you could create a class that inherits from HttpClient (See Nkosi's example, it's a much better approach than mine). Life would be much easier if HttpClient had an interface that you could mock, unfortunately it does not.

This example is not the golden ticket however. IHttpHandler still relies on HttpResponseMessage, which belongs to System.Net.Http namespace, therefore if you do need other implementations other than HttpClient, you will have to perform some kind of mapping to convert their responses into HttpResponseMessage objects. This of course is only a problem if you need to use multiple implementations of IHttpHandler but it doesn't look like you do so it's not the end of the world, but it's something to think about.

Anyway, you can simply mock IHttpHandler without having to worry about the concrete HttpClient class as it has been abstracted away.

I recommend testing the non-async methods, as these still call the asynchronous methods but without the hassle of having to worry about unit testing asynchronous methods, see here

  • This does indeed answer my question. Nkosis answer is also correct so I am not sure which I should accept as answer, but I will go with this one. Thank you both for the effort – tjugg Apr 5 '16 at 12:56
  • @tjugg Glad to help. Feel free to up vote the answers if you found them to be useful. – Nkosi Apr 5 '16 at 13:01
  • 3
    Worth noting that the main difference between this answer and Nkosi's is this is a much thinner abstraction. Thin is probably good for a humble object – Ben Aaronson Apr 5 '16 at 13:06
177

HttpClient's extensibility lies in the HttpMessageHandler passed to the constructor. Its intent is to allow platform specific implementations, but you can also mock it. There's no need to create a decorator wrapper for HttpClient.

If you'd prefer a DSL to using Moq, I have a library up on GitHub/Nuget that makes things a little easier: https://github.com/richardszalay/mockhttp

var mockHttp = new MockHttpMessageHandler();

// Setup a respond for the user api (including a wildcard in the URL)
mockHttp.When("http://localost/api/user/*")
        .Respond("application/json", "{'name' : 'Test McGee'}"); // Respond with JSON

// Inject the handler or client into your application code
var client = new HttpClient(mockHttp);

var response = await client.GetAsync("http://localhost/api/user/1234");
// or without async: var response = client.GetAsync("http://localhost/api/user/1234").Result;

var json = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

// No network connection required
Console.Write(json); // {'name' : 'Test McGee'}
  • So I would just pass MockHttpMessageHandler as the messagehandler Httphandler class? Or how have you implemented it in your own projects – tjugg Apr 5 '16 at 14:29
  • 2
    Great answer and something I wouldn't have initially known. Makes working with HttpClient not so bad. – Bealer Feb 21 '17 at 14:56
  • 6
    For people who don't want to deal with injecting the client but still want easy testability, it's trivial to achieve. Just replace var client = new HttpClient() with var client = ClientFactory() and setup a field internal static Func<HttpClient> ClientFactory = () => new HttpClient(); and at the test level you can rewrite this field. – Chris Marisic May 16 '17 at 19:59
  • 2
    @ChrisMarisic you are suggesting a form of service location to replace injection. Service location is a well-known anti-pattern so imho injection is preferrable. – MarioDS May 17 '17 at 8:09
  • 2
    @MarioDS and regardless, you shouldn't be injecting a HttpClient instance at all. If you are dead set on using constructer injection for this then you should be injecting a HttpClientFactory as in Func<HttpClient>. Given I view HttpClient as purely an implementation detail and not a dependency, i'll use statics just as I illustrated above. I'm entirely fine with tests manipulating internals. If I care about pure-ism i'll stand up full servers and test live code paths. Using any kind of mock means you accept approximation of behavior not actual behavior. – Chris Marisic May 17 '17 at 21:46
32

I agree with some of the other answers that the best approach is to mock HttpMessageHandler rather than wrap HttpClient. This answer is unique in that it still injects HttpClient, allowing it to be a singleton or managed with dependency injection.

"HttpClient is intended to be instantiated once and re-used throughout the life of an application." (Source).

Mocking HttpMessageHandler can be a little tricky because SendAsync is protected. Here's a complete example, using xunit and Moq.

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Moq;
using Moq.Protected;
using Xunit;
// Use nuget to install xunit and Moq

namespace MockHttpClient {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            var analyzer = new SiteAnalyzer(Client);
            var size = analyzer.GetContentSize("http://microsoft.com").Result;
            Console.WriteLine($"Size: {size}");
        }

        private static readonly HttpClient Client = new HttpClient(); // Singleton
    }

    public class SiteAnalyzer {
        public SiteAnalyzer(HttpClient httpClient) {
            _httpClient = httpClient;
        }

        public async Task<int> GetContentSize(string uri)
        {
            var response = await _httpClient.GetAsync( uri );
            var content = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
            return content.Length;
        }

        private readonly HttpClient _httpClient;
    }

    public class SiteAnalyzerTests {
        [Fact]
        public async void GetContentSizeReturnsCorrectLength() {
            // Arrange
            const string testContent = "test content";
            var mockMessageHandler = new Mock<HttpMessageHandler>();
            mockMessageHandler.Protected()
                .Setup<Task<HttpResponseMessage>>("SendAsync", ItExpr.IsAny<HttpRequestMessage>(), ItExpr.IsAny<CancellationToken>())
                .ReturnsAsync(new HttpResponseMessage {
                    StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.OK,
                    Content = new StringContent(testContent)
                });
            var underTest = new SiteAnalyzer(new HttpClient(mockMessageHandler.Object));

            // Act
            var result = await underTest.GetContentSize("http://anyurl");

            // Assert
            Assert.Equal(testContent.Length, result);
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    I really liked this. The mockMessageHandler.Protected() was the killer. Thanks for this example. It allows to write the test without modifying the source at all. – tyrion Nov 16 '17 at 7:18
  • 1
    FYI, Moq 4.8 supports strongly typed mocking of protected members - github.com/Moq/moq4/wiki/Quickstart – Richard Szalay Apr 12 '18 at 20:39
  • 2
    This looks great. Also Moq supports ReturnsAsync so the code would look like .ReturnsAsync(new HttpResponseMessage {StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.OK, Content = new StringContent(testContent)}) – kord Jun 6 '18 at 18:16
  • Thanks @kord, I added that to the answer – PointZeroTwo Aug 29 '18 at 20:47
  • 2
    Is there any way to verify that "SandAsync" was called with some parameters? I've tried to use ...Protected().Verify(...), but looks like it does not work with async methods. – Rroman Oct 31 '18 at 18:10
25

This is a common question, and I was heavily on the side wanting the ability to mock HttpClient, but I think I finally came to the realization that you shouldn't be mocking HttpClient. It seems logical to do so, but I think we've been brainwashed by things we see in open source libraries.

We often see "Clients" out there that we mock in our code so that we can test in isolation, so we automatically try to apply the same principle to HttpClient. HttpClient actually does a lot; you can think of it as a manager for HttpMessageHandler, so you don't wanna mock that, and that's why it still doesn't have an interface. The part that you're really interested in for unit testing, or designing your services, even, is the HttpMessageHandler since that is what returns the response, and you can mock that.

It's also worth pointing out that you should probably start treating HttpClient like a bigger deal. For example: Keep your instatiating of new HttpClients to a minimum. Reuse them, they're designed to be reused and use a crap ton less resources if you do. If you start treating it like a bigger deal, it'll feel much more wrong wanting to mock it and now the message handler will start to be the thing that you're injecting, not the client.

In other words, design your dependencies around the handler instead of the client. Even better, abstract "services" that use HttpClient which allow you to inject a handler, and use that as your injectable dependency instead. Then in your tests, you can fake the handler to control the response for setting up your tests.

Wrapping HttpClient is an insane waste of time.

Update: See Joshua Dooms's example. It's exactly what I'm recommending.

14

As also mentioned in the comments you need to abstract away the HttpClient so as not to be coupled to it. I've done something similar in the past. I'll try to adapt what I did with what you are trying to do.

First look at the HttpClient class and decided on what functionality it provided that would be needed.

Here is a possibility:

public interface IHttpClient {
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> DeleteAsync<T>(string uri) where T : class;
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> DeleteAsync<T>(Uri uri) where T : class;
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> GetAsync<T>(string uri) where T : class;
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> GetAsync<T>(Uri uri) where T : class;
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> PostAsync<T>(string uri, object package);
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> PostAsync<T>(Uri uri, object package);
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> PutAsync<T>(string uri, object package);
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> PutAsync<T>(Uri uri, object package);
}

Again as stated before this was for particular purposes. I completely abstracted away most dependencies to anything dealing with HttpClient and focused on what I wanted returned. You should evaluate how you want to abstract the HttpClient to provide only the necessary functionality you want.

This will now allow you to mock only what is needed to be tested.

I would even recommend doing away with IHttpHandler completely and use the HttpClient abstraction IHttpClient. But I'm just not picking as you can replace the body of your handler interface with the members of the abstracted client.

An implementation of the IHttpClient can then be used to wrapp/adapt a real/concrete HttpClient or any other object for that matter, that can be used to make HTTP requests as what you really wanted was a service that provided that functionality as apposed to HttpClient specifically. Using the abstraction is a clean (My opinion) and SOLID approach and can make your code more maintainable if you need to switch out the underlying client for something else as the framework changes.

Here is a snippet of how an implementation could be done.

/// <summary>
/// HTTP Client adaptor wraps a <see cref="System.Net.Http.HttpClient"/> 
/// that contains a reference to <see cref="ConfigurableMessageHandler"/>
/// </summary>
public sealed class HttpClientAdaptor : IHttpClient {
    HttpClient httpClient;

    public HttpClientAdaptor(IHttpClientFactory httpClientFactory) {
        httpClient = httpClientFactory.CreateHttpClient(**Custom configurations**);
    }

    //...other code

     /// <summary>
    ///  Send a GET request to the specified Uri as an asynchronous operation.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Response type</typeparam>
    /// <param name="uri">The Uri the request is sent to</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public async System.Threading.Tasks.Task<T> GetAsync<T>(Uri uri) where T : class {
        var result = default(T);
        //Try to get content as T
        try {
            //send request and get the response
            var response = await httpClient.GetAsync(uri).ConfigureAwait(false);
            //if there is content in response to deserialize
            if (response.Content.Headers.ContentLength.GetValueOrDefault() > 0) {
                //get the content
                string responseBodyAsText = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().ConfigureAwait(false);
                //desrialize it
                result = deserializeJsonToObject<T>(responseBodyAsText);
            }
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            Log.Error(ex);
        }
        return result;
    }

    //...other code
}

As you can see in the above example, a lot of the heavy lifting usually associated with using HttpClient is hidden behind the abstraction.

You connection class can then be inject with the abstracted client

public class Connection
{
    private IHttpClient _httpClient;

    public Connection(IHttpClient httpClient)
    {
        _httpClient = httpClient;
    }
}

Your test can then mock what is needed for your SUT

private IHttpClient _httpClient;

[TestMethod]
public void TestMockConnection()
{
    SomeModelObject model = new SomeModelObject();
    var httpClientMock = new Mock<IHttpClient>();
    httpClientMock.Setup(c => c.GetAsync<SomeModelObject>(It.IsAny<string>()))
        .Returns(() => Task.FromResult(model));

    _httpClient = httpClientMock.Object;

    var client = new Connection(_httpClient);

    // Assuming doSomething uses the client to make
    // a request for a model of type SomeModelObject
    client.doSomething();  
}
  • THIS is the answer. An abstraction above HttpClient and an adapter to create your specific instance using HttpClientFactory. Doing this makes testing the logic beyond the HTTP request trivial, which is the goal here. – pim Sep 18 '18 at 14:47
11

Building on the other answers, I suggest this code, which does not have any outside dependencies:

[TestClass]
public class MyTestClass
{
    [TestMethod]
    public async Task MyTestMethod()
    {
        var httpClient = new HttpClient(new MockHttpMessageHandler());

        var content = await httpClient.GetStringAsync("http://some.fake.url");

        Assert.AreEqual("Content as string", content);
    }
}

public class MockHttpMessageHandler : HttpMessageHandler
{
    protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(
        HttpRequestMessage request,
        CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var responseMessage = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            Content = new StringContent("Content as string")
        };

        return await Task.FromResult(responseMessage);
    }
}
  • 4
    You are effectively testing your mock. The real power of a mock is that you can set expectations and alter it's behaviour in each test. The fact that you have to implement some HttpMessageHandler yourself makes that next to impossible - and you have to because the methods are protected internal. – MarioDS May 17 '17 at 8:34
  • 1
    @MarioDS I think the point is that you can mock the HTTP response so you can test the rest of the code. If you inject a factory that gets the HttpClient, then in tests you can supply this HttpClient. – chris31389 May 22 at 13:26
9

I think the issue is that you've got it just a little upside down.

public class AuroraClient : IAuroraClient
{
    private readonly HttpClient _client;

    public AuroraClient() : this(new HttpClientHandler())
    {
    }

    public AuroraClient(HttpMessageHandler messageHandler)
    {
        _client = new HttpClient(messageHandler);
    }
}

If you look at the class above, I think this is what you want. Microsoft recommends keeping the client alive for optimal performance, so this type of structure allows you to do that. Also the HttpMessageHandler is an abstract class and therefore mockable. Your test method would then look like this:

[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod1()
{
    // Arrange
    var mockMessageHandler = new Mock<HttpMessageHandler>();
    // Set up your mock behavior here
    var auroraClient = new AuroraClient(mockMessageHandler.Object);
    // Act
    // Assert
}

This allows you to test your logic while mocking the HttpClient's behavior.

Sorry guys, after writing this and trying it myself, I realized that you can't mock the protected methods on the HttpMessageHandler. I subsequently added the following code to allow for injection of a proper mock.

public interface IMockHttpMessageHandler
{
    Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken);
}

public class MockHttpMessageHandler : HttpMessageHandler
{
    private readonly IMockHttpMessageHandler _realMockHandler;

    public MockHttpMessageHandler(IMockHttpMessageHandler realMockHandler)
    {
        _realMockHandler = realMockHandler;
    }

    protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return await _realMockHandler.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
    }
}

The tests written with this then look something like the following:

[TestMethod]
    public async Task GetProductsReturnsDeserializedXmlXopData()
    {
        // Arrange
        var mockMessageHandler = new Mock<IMockHttpMessageHandler>();
        // Set up Mock behavior here.
        var auroraClient = new AuroraClient(new MockHttpMessageHandler(mockMessageHandler.Object));
        // Act
        // Assert
    }
7

One of my colleagues noticed that most of the HttpClient methods all call SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken) under the hood, which is a virtual method off of HttpMessageInvoker:

So by far the easiest way to mock out HttpClient was to simply mock that particular method:

var mockClient = new Mock<HttpClient>();
mockClient.Setup(client => client.SendAsync(It.IsAny<HttpRequestMessage>(), It.IsAny<CancellationToken>())).ReturnsAsync(_mockResponse.Object);

and your code can call most (but not all) of the HttpClient class methods, including a regular

httpClient.SendAsync(req)

Check here to confirm https://github.com/dotnet/corefx/blob/master/src/System.Net.Http/src/System/Net/Http/HttpClient.cs

  • 1
    This works amazing! Thanks! – Teoman shipahi Jun 15 '18 at 15:42
  • 1
    This doesn't work for any code that calls SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage) directly though. If you can modify your code not to use this convenience function, then mocking HttpClient directly by overriding SendAsync is actually the cleanest solution I've found. – Dylan Nicholson Mar 12 at 5:05
6

One alternative would be to setup a stub HTTP server that returns canned responses based on pattern matching the request url, meaning you test real HTTP requests not mocks. Historically this would have taken significant develoment effort and would have been far to slow to be considered for unit testing, however OSS library WireMock.net is easy to use and fast enough to be run with lots of tests so may be worth considering. Setup is a few lines of code:

var server = FluentMockServer.Start();
server.Given(
      Request.Create()
      .WithPath("/some/thing").UsingGet()
   )
   .RespondWith(
       Response.Create()
       .WithStatusCode(200)
       .WithHeader("Content-Type", "application/json")
       .WithBody("{'attr':'value'}")
   );

You can find a more details and guidance on using wiremock in tests here.

3

Joining the party a bit late, but I like using wiremocking (https://github.com/WireMock-Net/WireMock.Net) whenever possible in the integrationtest of a dotnet core microservice with downstream REST dependencies.

By implementing a TestHttpClientFactory extending the IHttpClientFactory we can override the method

HttpClient CreateClient(string name)

So when using the named clients within your app you are in control of returning a HttpClient wired to your wiremock.

The good thing about this approach is that you are not changing anything within the application you are testing, and enables course integration tests doing an actual REST request to your service and mocking the json (or whatever) the actual downstream request should return. This leads to concise tests and as little mocking as possible in your application.

    public class TestHttpClientFactory : IHttpClientFactory 
{
    public HttpClient CreateClient(string name)
    {
        var httpClient = new HttpClient
        {
            BaseAddress = new Uri(G.Config.Get<string>($"App:Endpoints:{name}"))
            // G.Config is our singleton config access, so the endpoint 
            // to the running wiremock is used in the test
        };
        return httpClient;
    }
}

and

// in bootstrap of your Microservice
IHttpClientFactory factory = new TestHttpClientFactory();
container.Register<IHttpClientFactory>(factory);
2

You could use RichardSzalay MockHttp library which mocks the HttpMessageHandler and can return an HttpClient object to be used during tests.

GitHub MockHttp

PM> Install-Package RichardSzalay.MockHttp

From the GitHub documentation

MockHttp defines a replacement HttpMessageHandler, the engine that drives HttpClient, that provides a fluent configuration API and provides a canned response. The caller (eg. your application's service layer) remains unaware of its presence.

Example from GitHub

 var mockHttp = new MockHttpMessageHandler();

// Setup a respond for the user api (including a wildcard in the URL)
mockHttp.When("http://localhost/api/user/*")
        .Respond("application/json", "{'name' : 'Test McGee'}"); // Respond with JSON

// Inject the handler or client into your application code
var client = mockHttp.ToHttpClient();

var response = await client.GetAsync("http://localhost/api/user/1234");
// or without async: var response = client.GetAsync("http://localhost/api/user/1234").Result;

var json = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

// No network connection required
Console.Write(json); // {'name' : 'Test McGee'}
1

This is an old question, but I feel the urge to extend the answers with a solution I didn't see here.
You can fake the Microsoft assemly (System.Net.Http) and then use ShinsContext during the test.

  1. In VS 2017, right click on the System.Net.Http assembly and choose "Add Fakes Assembly"
  2. Put your code in the unit test method under a ShimsContext.Create() using. This way, you can isolate the code where you are planning to fake the HttpClient.
  3. Depends on your implementation and test, I would suggest to implement all the desired acting where you call a method on the HttpClient and want to fake the returned value. Using ShimHttpClient.AllInstances will fake your implementation in all the instances created during your test. For example, if you want to fake the GetAsync() method, do the following:

    [TestMethod]
    public void FakeHttpClient()
    {
        using (ShimsContext.Create())
        {
            System.Net.Http.Fakes.ShimHttpClient.AllInstances.GetAsyncString = (c, requestUri) =>
            {
              //Return a service unavailable response
              var httpResponseMessage = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.ServiceUnavailable);
              var task = Task.FromResult(httpResponseMessage);
              return task;
            };
    
            //your implementation will use the fake method(s) automatically
            var client = new Connection(_httpClient);
            client.doSomething(); 
        }
    }
    
1

I did something very simple, as I was in a DI environment.

public class HttpHelper : IHttpHelper
{
    private ILogHelper _logHelper;

    public HttpHelper(ILogHelper logHelper)
    {
        _logHelper = logHelper;
    }

    public virtual async Task<HttpResponseMessage> GetAsync(string uri, Dictionary<string, string> headers = null)
    {
        HttpResponseMessage response;
        using (var client = new HttpClient())
        {
            if (headers != null)
            {
                foreach (var h in headers)
                {
                    client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add(h.Key, h.Value);
                }
            }
            response = await client.GetAsync(uri);
        }

        return response;
    }

    public async Task<T> GetAsync<T>(string uri, Dictionary<string, string> headers = null)
    {
        ...

        rawResponse = await GetAsync(uri, headers);

        ...
    }

}

and the mock is:

    [TestInitialize]
    public void Initialize()
    {
       ...
        _httpHelper = new Mock<HttpHelper>(_logHelper.Object) { CallBase = true };
       ...
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public async Task SuccessStatusCode_WithAuthHeader()
    {
        ...

        _httpHelper.Setup(m => m.GetAsync(_uri, myHeaders)).Returns(
            Task<HttpResponseMessage>.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                return new HttpResponseMessage(System.Net.HttpStatusCode.OK)
                {
                    Content = new StringContent(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(_testData))
                };
            })
        );
        var result = await _httpHelper.Object.GetAsync<TestDTO>(...);

        Assert.AreEqual(...);
    }
1

I'm not convinced by many of the answers.

First of all, imagine you want to unit test a method that uses HttpClient. You should not instantiate HttpClient directly in your implementation. You should inject a factory with the responsibility of providing an instance of HttpClient for you. That way you can mock later on that factory and return whichever HttpClient you want (e.g: a mock HttpClient and not the real one).

So, you would have a factory like the following:

public interface IHttpClientFactory
{
    HttpClient Create();
}

And an implementation:

public class HttpClientFactory
    : IHttpClientFactory
{
    public HttpClient Create()
    {
        var httpClient = new HttpClient();
        return httpClient;
    }
}

Of course you would need to register in your IoC Container this implementation. If you use Autofac it would be something like:

builder
    .RegisterType<IHttpClientFactory>()
    .As<HttpClientFactory>()
    .SingleInstance();

Now you would have a proper and testeable implementation. Imagine that your method is something like:

public class MyHttpClient
    : IMyHttpClient
{
    private readonly IHttpClientFactory _httpClientFactory;

    public SalesOrderHttpClient(IHttpClientFactory httpClientFactory)
    {
        _httpClientFactory = httpClientFactory;
    }

    public async Task<string> PostAsync(Uri uri, string content)
    {
        using (var client = _httpClientFactory.Create())
        {
            var clientAddress = uri.GetLeftPart(UriPartial.Authority);
            client.BaseAddress = new Uri(clientAddress);
            var content = new StringContent(content, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");
            var uriAbsolutePath = uri.AbsolutePath;
            var response = await client.PostAsync(uriAbsolutePath, content);
            var responseJson = response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
            return responseJson;
        }
    }
}

Now the testing part. HttpClient extends HttpMessageHandler, which is abstract. Let's create a "mock" of HttpMessageHandler that accepts a delegate so that when we use the mock we can also setup each behaviour for each test.

public class MockHttpMessageHandler 
    : HttpMessageHandler
{
    private readonly Func<HttpRequestMessage, CancellationToken, Task<HttpResponseMessage>> _sendAsyncFunc;

    public MockHttpMessageHandler(Func<HttpRequestMessage, CancellationToken, Task<HttpResponseMessage>> sendAsyncFunc)
    {
        _sendAsyncFunc = sendAsyncFunc;
    }

    protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return await _sendAsyncFunc.Invoke(request, cancellationToken);
    }
}

And now, and with the help of Moq (and FluentAssertions, a library that makes unit tests more readable), we have everything needed to unit test our method PostAsync that uses HttpClient

public static class PostAsyncTests
{
    public class Given_A_Uri_And_A_JsonMessage_When_Posting_Async
        : Given_WhenAsync_Then_Test
    {
        private SalesOrderHttpClient _sut;
        private Uri _uri;
        private string _content;
        private string _expectedResult;
        private string _result;

        protected override void Given()
        {
            _uri = new Uri("http://test.com/api/resources");
            _content = "{\"foo\": \"bar\"}";
            _expectedResult = "{\"result\": \"ok\"}";

            var httpClientFactoryMock = new Mock<IHttpClientFactory>();
            var messageHandlerMock =
                new MockHttpMessageHandler((request, cancellation) =>
                {
                    var responseMessage =
                        new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.Created)
                        {
                            Content = new StringContent("{\"result\": \"ok\"}")
                        };

                    var result = Task.FromResult(responseMessage);
                    return result;
                });

            var httpClient = new HttpClient(messageHandlerMock);
            httpClientFactoryMock
                .Setup(x => x.Create())
                .Returns(httpClient);

            var httpClientFactory = httpClientFactoryMock.Object;

            _sut = new SalesOrderHttpClient(httpClientFactory);
        }

        protected override async Task WhenAsync()
        {
            _result = await _sut.PostAsync(_uri, _content);
        }


        [Fact]
        public void Then_It_Should_Return_A_Valid_JsonMessage()
        {
            _result.Should().BeEquivalentTo(_expectedResult);
        }
    }
}

Obviously this test is silly, and we're really testing our mock. But you get the idea. You should test meaningful logic depending on your implementation such as..

  • if the code status of the response is not 201, should it throw an exception?
  • if the response text cannot be parsed, what should happen?
  • etc.

The purpose of this answer was to test something that uses HttpClient and this is a nice clean way to do so.

1

All you need is a test version of HttpMessageHandler class which you pass to HttpClient ctor. The main point is that your test HttpMessageHandler class will have a HttpRequestHandler delegate that the callers can set and simply handle the HttpRequest the way they want.

public class FakeHttpMessageHandler : HttpMessageHandler
    {
        public Func<HttpRequestMessage, CancellationToken, HttpResponseMessage> HttpRequestHandler { get; set; } =
        (r, c) => 
            new HttpResponseMessage
            {
                ReasonPhrase = r.RequestUri.AbsoluteUri,
                StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.OK
            };


        protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
        {
            return Task.FromResult(HttpRequestHandler(request, cancellationToken));
        }
    }

You can use an instance of this class to create a concrete HttpClient instance. Via the HttpRequestHandler delegate you have full control over outgoing http requests from HttpClient.

1

Here's a simple solution, which worked well for me.

Using the moq mocking library.

// ARRANGE
var handlerMock = new Mock<HttpMessageHandler>(MockBehavior.Strict);
handlerMock
   .Protected()
   // Setup the PROTECTED method to mock
   .Setup<Task<HttpResponseMessage>>(
      "SendAsync",
      ItExpr.IsAny<HttpRequestMessage>(),
      ItExpr.IsAny<CancellationToken>()
   )
   // prepare the expected response of the mocked http call
   .ReturnsAsync(new HttpResponseMessage()
   {
      StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.OK,
      Content = new StringContent("[{'id':1,'value':'1'}]"),
   })
   .Verifiable();

// use real http client with mocked handler here
var httpClient = new HttpClient(handlerMock.Object)
{
   BaseAddress = new Uri("http://test.com/"),
};

var subjectUnderTest = new MyTestClass(httpClient);

// ACT
var result = await subjectUnderTest
   .GetSomethingRemoteAsync('api/test/whatever');

// ASSERT
result.Should().NotBeNull(); // this is fluent assertions here...
result.Id.Should().Be(1);

// also check the 'http' call was like we expected it
var expectedUri = new Uri("http://test.com/api/test/whatever");

handlerMock.Protected().Verify(
   "SendAsync",
   Times.Exactly(1), // we expected a single external request
   ItExpr.Is<HttpRequestMessage>(req =>
      req.Method == HttpMethod.Get  // we expected a GET request
      && req.RequestUri == expectedUri // to this uri
   ),
   ItExpr.IsAny<CancellationToken>()
);

Source: https://gingter.org/2018/07/26/how-to-mock-httpclient-in-your-net-c-unit-tests/

0

Inspired by PointZeroTwo's answer, here's a sample using NUnit and FakeItEasy.

SystemUnderTest in this example is the class that you want to test - no sample content given for it but I assume you have that already!

[TestFixture]
public class HttpClientTests
{
    private ISystemUnderTest _systemUnderTest;
    private HttpMessageHandler _mockMessageHandler;

    [SetUp]
    public void Setup()
    {
        _mockMessageHandler = A.Fake<HttpMessageHandler>();
        var httpClient = new HttpClient(_mockMessageHandler);

        _systemUnderTest = new SystemUnderTest(httpClient);
    }

    [Test]
    public void HttpError()
    {
        // Arrange
        A.CallTo(_mockMessageHandler)
            .Where(x => x.Method.Name == "SendAsync")
            .WithReturnType<Task<HttpResponseMessage>>()
            .Returns(Task.FromResult(new HttpResponseMessage
            {
                StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError,
                Content = new StringContent("abcd")
            }));

        // Act
        var result = _systemUnderTest.DoSomething();

        // Assert
        // Assert.AreEqual(...);
    }
}

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