428

How do I Deserialize this XML document:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Cars>
  <Car>
    <StockNumber>1020</StockNumber>
    <Make>Nissan</Make>
    <Model>Sentra</Model>
  </Car>
  <Car>
    <StockNumber>1010</StockNumber>
    <Make>Toyota</Make>
    <Model>Corolla</Model>
  </Car>
  <Car>
    <StockNumber>1111</StockNumber>
    <Make>Honda</Make>
    <Model>Accord</Model>
  </Car>
</Cars>

I have this:

[Serializable()]
public class Car
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute("StockNumber")]
    public string StockNumber{ get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute("Make")]
    public string Make{ get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute("Model")]
    public string Model{ get; set; }
}

.

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute("Cars", Namespace = "", IsNullable = false)]
public class Cars
{
    [XmlArrayItem(typeof(Car))]
    public Car[] Car { get; set; }

}

.

public class CarSerializer
{
    public Cars Deserialize()
    {
        Cars[] cars = null;
        string path = HttpContext.Current.ApplicationInstance.Server.MapPath("~/App_Data/") + "cars.xml";

        XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Cars[]));

        StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(path);
        reader.ReadToEnd();
        cars = (Cars[])serializer.Deserialize(reader);
        reader.Close();

        return cars;
    }
}

that don't seem to work :-(

17 Answers 17

330

Here's a working version. I changed the XmlElementAttribute labels to XmlElement because in the xml the StockNumber, Make and Model values are elements, not attributes. Also I removed the reader.ReadToEnd(); (that function reads the whole stream and returns a string, so the Deserialze() function couldn't use the reader anymore...the position was at the end of the stream). I also took a few liberties with the naming :).

Here are the classes:

[Serializable()]
public class Car
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement("StockNumber")]
    public string StockNumber { get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement("Make")]
    public string Make { get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement("Model")]
    public string Model { get; set; }
}


[Serializable()]
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRoot("CarCollection")]
public class CarCollection
{
    [XmlArray("Cars")]
    [XmlArrayItem("Car", typeof(Car))]
    public Car[] Car { get; set; }
}

The Deserialize function:

CarCollection cars = null;
string path = "cars.xml";

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(CarCollection));

StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(path);
cars = (CarCollection)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
reader.Close();

And the slightly tweaked xml (I needed to add a new element to wrap <Cars>...Net is picky about deserializing arrays):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<CarCollection>
<Cars>
  <Car>
    <StockNumber>1020</StockNumber>
    <Make>Nissan</Make>
    <Model>Sentra</Model>
  </Car>
  <Car>
    <StockNumber>1010</StockNumber>
    <Make>Toyota</Make>
    <Model>Corolla</Model>
  </Car>
  <Car>
    <StockNumber>1111</StockNumber>
    <Make>Honda</Make>
    <Model>Accord</Model>
  </Car>
</Cars>
</CarCollection>
  • 63
    The [Serializable] is redundant if using XmlSerializer; XmlSerializer simply never checks for that. Likewise, most of the [Xml...] attributes are redundant, as it simply mimics the default behaviour; i.e. by default a property called StockNumber is stored as an element named <StockNumber> - no need for attributes for that. – Marc Gravell May 8 '12 at 6:13
  • 3
    Note that XmlElementAttribute = XmlElement (it is a language feature that you can omit the suffix "Attribute") Real solution here is the removing of the ReadToEnd() call and adding of a root node. But better use the code from erymski which solves the question (parse the given xml) – Flamefire Oct 24 '14 at 23:06
  • 2
    Thanks Kevin, But what if I removed the CarsCollection from sample XML. I removed Carscollection from classes and Deserealize code , but didn't succeed. – Vikrant Jul 27 '15 at 12:52
416

How about you just save the xml to a file, and use xsd to generate C# classes?

  1. Write the file to disk (I named it foo.xml)
  2. Generate the xsd: xsd foo.xml
  3. Generate the C#: xsd foo.xsd /classes

Et voila - and C# code file that should be able to read the data via XmlSerializer:

    XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Cars));
    Cars cars;
    using (XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(path))
    {
        cars = (Cars) ser.Deserialize(reader);
    }

(include the generated foo.cs in the project)

  • 5
    YOU... are the man! Thanks. for anyone that needs it, "path" can be a Stream that you create from a web response like so: var resp = response.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync(); var stream = new MemoryStream(resp.Result); – Induster Feb 1 '13 at 17:36
  • Awesome idea, but couldn't get it to work right for my slightly more complicated model with batches of nested arrays. I kept getting type conversion errors for the nested arrays -- plus the naming scheme generated left something to be desired. Therefore I ended up going the custom route. – GotDibbs Feb 6 '13 at 16:21
  • 9
    How to get to xsd.exe – jwillmer Oct 29 '13 at 12:00
  • 2
    xsd.exe is available from the visual studio command prompt, not windows command prompt. See if you can open the command prompt from within visual studio under Tools. If not, try accessing it from the visual studio folder. For VS 2012 it was located here: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\Tools\Shortcuts. In Windows 8 try searching for "Visual Studio Tools". – goku_da_master Oct 16 '14 at 15:40
  • 1
    For everybody who's looking for XSD. Here's a SO thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/22975031/… – SOReader Oct 13 '15 at 11:39
214

You have two possibilities.

Method 1. XSD tool


Suppose that you have your XML file in this location C:\path\to\xml\file.xml

  1. Open Developer Command Prompt
    You can find it in Start Menu > Programs > Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 > Visual Studio Tools Or if you have Windows 8 can just start typing Developer Command Prompt in Start screen
  2. Change location to your XML file directory by typing cd /D "C:\path\to\xml"
  3. Create XSD file from your xml file by typing xsd file.xml
  4. Create C# classes by typing xsd /c file.xsd

And that's it! You have generated C# classes from xml file in C:\path\to\xml\file.cs

Method 2 - Paste special


Required Visual Studio 2012+

  1. Copy content of your XML file to clipboard
  2. Add to your solution new, empty class file (Shift+Alt+C)
  3. Open that file and in menu click Edit > Paste special > Paste XML As Classes
    enter image description here

And that's it!

Usage


Usage is very simple with this helper class:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization; // Add reference: System.Web.Extensions
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace Helpers
{
    internal static class ParseHelpers
    {
        private static JavaScriptSerializer json;
        private static JavaScriptSerializer JSON { get { return json ?? (json = new JavaScriptSerializer()); } }

        public static Stream ToStream(this string @this)
        {
            var stream = new MemoryStream();
            var writer = new StreamWriter(stream);
            writer.Write(@this);
            writer.Flush();
            stream.Position = 0;
            return stream;
        }


        public static T ParseXML<T>(this string @this) where T : class
        {
            var reader = XmlReader.Create(@this.Trim().ToStream(), new XmlReaderSettings() { ConformanceLevel = ConformanceLevel.Document });
            return new XmlSerializer(typeof(T)).Deserialize(reader) as T;
        }

        public static T ParseJSON<T>(this string @this) where T : class
        {
            return JSON.Deserialize<T>(@this.Trim());
        }
    }
}

All you have to do now, is:

    public class JSONRoot
    {
        public catalog catalog { get; set; }
    }
    // ...

    string xml = File.ReadAllText(@"D:\file.xml");
    var catalog1 = xml.ParseXML<catalog>();

    string json = File.ReadAllText(@"D:\file.json");
    var catalog2 = json.ParseJSON<JSONRoot>();
  • 16
    +1 good answer. But, the Paste XML As Classes command targets only .NET 4.5 – javad amiry Nov 16 '13 at 10:24
  • 1
    This is a great way to generate the model if you do have vs2012+ installed. I did run ReSharper code cleanup afterwards to use automatic properties and then did some other tidying up as well. You could generate via this method and then copy into an older proj if need be. – Scotty.NET Nov 25 '14 at 9:10
  • 3
    Targetting .net4.5 is not a problem. Just fire up a temporary project with dotnet4.5, do your copy-paste there and copy source to your actual project. – LosManos Mar 23 '15 at 9:46
  • 2
    where is the "catalog" object or class? – CB4 Dec 6 '16 at 14:44
  • 1
    For "Paste XML as classes" to show up in that menu on VS 2017 Community you need to have installed "ASP.NET and web development". If missing just run VS installer again to modify your installation. – Slion Aug 21 '18 at 17:31
78

The following snippet should do the trick (and you can ignore most of the serialization attributes):

public class Car
{
  public string StockNumber { get; set; }
  public string Make { get; set; }
  public string Model { get; set; }
}

[XmlRootAttribute("Cars")]
public class CarCollection
{
  [XmlElement("Car")]
  public Car[] Cars { get; set; }
}

...

using (TextReader reader = new StreamReader(path))
{
  XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(CarCollection));
  return (CarCollection) serializer.Deserialize(reader);
}
  • 13
    This is actually the one and only answer. The accepted answer has a couple of flaws that can confuse beginners. – Flamefire Oct 24 '14 at 23:03
  • 1
    Love the answer -- but I'm lost as to what it does -- Is the CarCollection class ignored because the root element is set to cars? Or is CarCollection being described as the root element, and the array of Car called Cars the one that is ignored? Is the deserialize function 'smart' and 'fits' each car into the array where the elements are Car? – Gerard ONeill Sep 15 '15 at 22:07
22

See if this helps:

[Serializable()]
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute("Cars", Namespace = "", IsNullable = false)]
public class Cars
{
    [XmlArrayItem(typeof(Car))]
    public Car[] Car { get; set; }
}

.

[Serializable()]
public class Car
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement()]
    public string StockNumber{ get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement()]
    public string Make{ get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement()]
    public string Model{ get; set; }
}

And failing that use the xsd.exe program that comes with visual studio to create a schema document based on that xml file, and then use it again to create a class based on the schema document.

9

I don't think .net is 'picky about deserializing arrays'. The first xml document is not well formed. There is no root element, although it looks like there is. The canonical xml document has a root and at least 1 element (if at all). In your example:

<Root> <-- well, the root
  <Cars> <-- an element (not a root), it being an array
    <Car> <-- an element, it being an array item
    ...
    </Car>
  </Cars>
</Root>
7

try this block of code if your .xml file has been generated somewhere in disk and if you have used List<T>:

//deserialization

XmlSerializer xmlser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<Item>));
StreamReader srdr = new StreamReader(@"C:\serialize.xml");
List<Item> p = (List<Item>)xmlser.Deserialize(srdr);
srdr.Close();`

Note: C:\serialize.xml is my .xml file's path. You can change it for your needs.

6

Kevin's anser is good, aside from the fact, that in the real world, you are often not able to alter the original XML to suit your needs.

There's a simple solution for the original XML, too:

[XmlRoot("Cars")]
public class XmlData
{
    [XmlElement("Car")]
    public List<Car> Cars{ get; set; }
}

public class Car
{
    public string StockNumber { get; set; }
    public string Make { get; set; }
    public string Model { get; set; }
}

And then you can simply call:

var ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(XmlData));
XmlData data = (XmlData)ser.Deserialize(XmlReader.Create(PathToCarsXml));
  • Thanks! Your answer is exactly what I needed, as I did not want to alter gigabytes worth of log files. – Colin Mar 12 '18 at 9:19
  • Although it's worth mentioning that the XmlSerializer solution is very elegant but admittedly also not very fast and reacts sensitively to unexpected Xml data. So if your problem doesn't require a complete deserialization, you should consider using the more pragmatic and performant XmlReader class only and loop through the <Car> elements. – Kim Homann Mar 21 '18 at 11:03
4

Try this Generic Class For Xml Serialization & Deserialization.

public class SerializeConfig<T> where T : class
{
    public static void Serialize(string path, T type)
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(type.GetType());
        using (var writer = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Create))
        {
            serializer.Serialize(writer, type);
        }
    }

    public static T DeSerialize(string path)
    {
        T type;
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        using (var reader = XmlReader.Create(path))
        {
            type = serializer.Deserialize(reader) as T;
        }
        return type;
    }
}
4

For Beginners

I found the answers here to be very helpful, that said I still struggled (just a bit) to get this working. So, in case it helps someone I'll spell out the working solution:

XML from Original Question. The xml is in a file Class1.xml, a path to this file is used in the code to locate this xml file.

I used the answer by @erymski to get this working, so created a file called Car.cs and added the following:

using System.Xml.Serialization;  // Added

public class Car
{
    public string StockNumber { get; set; }
    public string Make { get; set; }
    public string Model { get; set; }
}

[XmlRootAttribute("Cars")]
public class CarCollection
{
    [XmlElement("Car")]
    public Car[] Cars { get; set; }
}

The other bit of code provided by @erymski ...

using (TextReader reader = new StreamReader(path))
{
  XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(CarCollection));
  return (CarCollection) serializer.Deserialize(reader);
}

... goes into your main program (Program.cs), in static CarCollection XCar() like this:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace ConsoleApp2
{
    class Program
    {

        public static void Main()
        {
            var c = new CarCollection();

            c = XCar();

            foreach (var k in c.Cars)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(k.Make + " " + k.Model + " " + k.StockNumber);
            }
            c = null;
            Console.ReadLine();

        }
        static CarCollection XCar()
        {
            using (TextReader reader = new StreamReader(@"C:\Users\SlowLearner\source\repos\ConsoleApp2\ConsoleApp2\Class1.xml"))
            {
                XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(CarCollection));
                return (CarCollection)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
            }
        }
    }
}

Hope it helps :-)

  • 1
    It worked for me. This is a perfectly working solution for the given xml input (as in OP's example) too. [XmlElement("Car")] is the right attribute. In other examples they used XmlArray etc which are not needed as long as we have the property defined as public Car[] Cars { get; set; } and it would deserialize it correctly. Thanks. – Diwakar Padmaraja Jan 28 at 16:24
2

The idea is to have all level being handled for deserialization Please see a sample solution that solved my similar issue

<?xml version="1.0" ?> 
 <TRANSACTION_RESPONSE>
    <TRANSACTION>
        <TRANSACTION_ID>25429</TRANSACTION_ID> 
        <MERCHANT_ACC_NO>02700701354375000964</MERCHANT_ACC_NO> 
        <TXN_STATUS>F</TXN_STATUS> 
        <TXN_SIGNATURE>a16af68d4c3e2280e44bd7c2c23f2af6cb1f0e5a28c266ea741608e72b1a5e4224da5b975909cc43c53b6c0f7f1bbf0820269caa3e350dd1812484edc499b279</TXN_SIGNATURE> 
        <TXN_SIGNATURE2>B1684258EA112C8B5BA51F73CDA9864D1BB98E04F5A78B67A3E539BEF96CCF4D16CFF6B9E04818B50E855E0783BB075309D112CA596BDC49F9738C4BF3AA1FB4</TXN_SIGNATURE2> 
        <TRAN_DATE>29-09-2015 07:36:59</TRAN_DATE> 
        <MERCHANT_TRANID>150929093703RUDZMX4</MERCHANT_TRANID> 
        <RESPONSE_CODE>9967</RESPONSE_CODE> 
        <RESPONSE_DESC>Bank rejected transaction!</RESPONSE_DESC> 
        <CUSTOMER_ID>RUDZMX</CUSTOMER_ID> 
        <AUTH_ID /> 
        <AUTH_DATE /> 
        <CAPTURE_DATE /> 
        <SALES_DATE /> 
        <VOID_REV_DATE /> 
        <REFUND_DATE /> 
        <REFUND_AMOUNT>0.00</REFUND_AMOUNT> 
    </TRANSACTION>
  </TRANSACTION_RESPONSE> 

The above XML is handled in two level

  [XmlType("TRANSACTION_RESPONSE")]
public class TransactionResponse
{
    [XmlElement("TRANSACTION")]
    public BankQueryResponse Response { get; set; }

}

The Inner level

public class BankQueryResponse
{
    [XmlElement("TRANSACTION_ID")]
    public string TransactionId { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("MERCHANT_ACC_NO")]
    public string MerchantAccNo { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("TXN_SIGNATURE")]
    public string TxnSignature { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("TRAN_DATE")]
    public DateTime TranDate { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("TXN_STATUS")]
    public string TxnStatus { get; set; }


    [XmlElement("REFUND_DATE")]
    public DateTime RefundDate { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("RESPONSE_CODE")]
    public string ResponseCode { get; set; }


    [XmlElement("RESPONSE_DESC")]
    public string ResponseDesc { get; set; }

    [XmlAttribute("MERCHANT_TRANID")]
    public string MerchantTranId { get; set; }

}

Same Way you need multiple level with car as array Check this example for multilevel deserialization

  • Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – NightShadeQueen Sep 30 '15 at 3:29
1

If you're getting errors using xsd.exe to create your xsd file, then use the XmlSchemaInference class as mentioned on msdn. Here's a unit test to demonstrate:

using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Schema;

[TestMethod]
public void GenerateXsdFromXmlTest()
{
    string folder = @"C:\mydir\mydata\xmlToCSharp";
    XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(folder + "\some_xml.xml");
    XmlSchemaSet schemaSet = new XmlSchemaSet();
    XmlSchemaInference schema = new XmlSchemaInference();

    schemaSet = schema.InferSchema(reader);


    foreach (XmlSchema s in schemaSet.Schemas())
    {
        XmlWriter xsdFile = new XmlTextWriter(folder + "\some_xsd.xsd", System.Text.Encoding.UTF8);
        s.Write(xsdFile);
        xsdFile.Close();
    }
}

// now from the visual studio command line type: xsd some_xsd.xsd /classes
1

You can just change one attribute for you Cars car property from XmlArrayItem to XmlElment. That is, from

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute("Cars", Namespace = "", IsNullable = false)]
public class Cars
{
    [XmlArrayItem(typeof(Car))]
    public Car[] Car { get; set; }
}

to

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute("Cars", Namespace = "", IsNullable = false)]
public class Cars
{
    [XmlElement("Car")]
    public Car[] Car { get; set; }
}
1

My solution:

  1. Use Edit > Past Special > Paste XML As Classes to get the class in your code
  2. Try something like this: create a list of that class (List<class1>), then use the XmlSerializer to serialize that list to a xml file.
  3. Now you just replace the body of that file with your data and try to deserialize it.

Code:

StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(@"C:\Users\duongngh\Desktop\Newfolder\abc.txt");
XmlSerializer xml = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Class1[]));
var a = xml.Deserialize(sr);
sr.Close();

NOTE: you must pay attention to the root name, don't change it. Mine is "ArrayOfClass1"

1

How about a generic class to deserialize an XML document

//++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
// Generic class to load any xml into a class
// used like this ...
// YourClassTypeHere InfoList = LoadXMLFileIntoClass<YourClassTypeHere>(xmlFile);

using System.IO;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

public static T LoadXMLFileIntoClass<T>(string xmlFile)
{
    T returnThis;
    XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    if (!FileAndIO.FileExists(xmlFile))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("FileDoesNotExistError {0}", xmlFile);
    }
    returnThis = (T)serializer.Deserialize(new StreamReader(xmlFile));
    return (T)returnThis;
}

This part may, or may not be necessary. Open the XML document in Visual Studio, right click on the XML, choose properties. Then choose your schema file.

0
string employeedata = "<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\"?><tag><name>test</bar></nmae>";//demo xml data
        using (TextReader sr = new StringReader(employeedata))
        {
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Employee));//pass type name in XmlSerializer constructor here
            Employee response = (Employee)serializer.Deserialize(sr);
            Console.WriteLine(response.name);
        }

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRoot("tag")]
public class Employee
{
    public string name { get; set; }
}
0
async public static Task<JObject> XMLtoNETAsync(XmlDocument ToConvert)
        {
            //Van XML naar JSON
            string jsonText = await Task.Run(() => JsonConvert.SerializeXmlNode(ToConvert));
            //Van JSON naar .net object
            var o = await Task.Run(() => JObject.Parse(jsonText));
            return o;
        }
  • Please put your answer always in context instead of just pasting code. See here for more details. – gehbiszumeis 2 days ago

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