I want to ask what last sentance mean and do (export default HelloWorld;) cant find in tutorials about it.

// hello-world.jsx

import React from 'react';

class HelloWorld extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello, world!</p>;
  }
}

export default HelloWorld;
up vote 66 down vote accepted

Export like export default HelloWorld; and import, such as import React from 'react' are part of the ES6 modules system.

A module is a self contained unit that can expose assets to other modules using export, and acquire assets from other modules using import.

In your code:

import React from 'react'; // get the React object from the react module

class HelloWorld extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello, world!</p>;
  }
}

export default HelloWorld; // expose the HelloWorld component to other modules

In ES6 there are two kinds of exports:

Named exports - for example export function func() {} is a named export with the name of func. Named modules can be imported using import { exportName } from 'module';. In this case, the name of the import should be the same as the name of the export. To import the func in the example, you'll have to use import { func } from 'module';. There can be multiple named exports in one module.

Default export - is the value that will be imported from the module, if you use the simple import statement import X from 'module'. X is the name that will be given locally to the variable assigned to contain the value, and it doesn't have to be named like the origin export. There can be only one default export.

A module can contain both named exports and a default export, and they can be imported together using import defaultExport, { namedExport1, namedExport3, etc... } from 'module';.

In Simple Words -

The export statement is used when creating JavaScript modules to export functions, objects, or primitive values from the module so they can be used by other programs with the import statement.

Here is a link to get clear understanding : MDN Web Docs

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