2

According to the Allocate string (char*) in another function I have now code like this:

 void someFunction(char** string, char** argv) {
    *string = (char*)malloc(strlen(argv[2]) + 1);
    strcpy(*string, argv[2]);
    strcat(*string, ".txt"); //works fine without this
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    char *string; 
    char *string2;

    someFunction(&string,argv);
    printf("%s",string);
    free(string); // freezes here due the strcat
}

After adding strcat to the code from the linked question, it freezes when I try to free my string.

  • 5
    That's probably because you allocated N+1 bytes and then stored N+5 bytes in it (where N is the length of the argument) – user253751 Apr 5 '16 at 22:37
  • before writing lines like strcat(*string, ".txt");, think about where in memory you are writing to, and whether you are guaranteed there is enough space allocated to write in. – M.M Apr 5 '16 at 22:38
  • @immibis You're right! What a silly question. – Lucfia Apr 5 '16 at 22:38
  • 1
    Side-note: since this is C, you should not cast the return value from malloc. – paddy Apr 5 '16 at 22:43
3

You didn't allocate enough space for the resulting concatenated string; when you write past the end you invoke undefined behavior (in this case, likely heap corruption). Change the malloc to allocate strlen(argv[2]) + strlen(".txt") + 1 so you have a large enough buffer to hold the whole string.

  • This is absolutly right answer. Thank you. – Lucfia Apr 5 '16 at 22:39
  • 1
    Note: strlen(argv[2]) + sizeof(".txt") also works, and would be faster, but it's a little more obscure, and people often make mistakes with sizeof, so I left the mention of it for a comment. – ShadowRanger Apr 5 '16 at 22:40
2

Function someFunction has a bug. It does not allocate enough memory to append ".txt".

It could look the following way

 void someFunction(char** string, char** argv) {
    *string = (char*)malloc(strlen(argv[2]) + 1 + 4 );
    strcpy(*string, argv[2]);
    strcat(*string, ".txt"); //works fine without this
}

However in any case the design of the function is bad. It uses magic number 2 in the expression argv[2] . If the function deals with argv[2] then there is no sense to pass as an argument the whole array pf pointers argv. You should just pass argv[2]. Moreover it uses parameter string by reference but does not free the memory that the parameter can point to. So its interface is confusing.

You can use the function shown in my answer to the question Safe way to concat two strings in C

The function could be called like

char *string = getConcatString( argv[2], ".txt" );

if ( string ) puts( string );

free( string );

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