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What happens if a negative floating point value is converted into a value of unsigned integral type? Standard quotes would be appreciated. The problem I'm facing is conversion into values of unsigned integral types from a variant class, that contains an object of floating-point type.

EXAMPLE:

unsigned i = -.1;
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    Please define converted. – Sourav Ghosh Apr 6 '16 at 6:52
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    Did you try it? What problems are you having? – jtbandes Apr 6 '16 at 6:57
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    @jtbandes: this is a deep question. It will be, at best, implementation defined. – Bathsheba Apr 6 '16 at 6:57
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    @SouravGhosh I would assume the C standard definition of conversion, as explained in chapter 6.3. – Lundin Apr 6 '16 at 6:57
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    @jtbandes trying is the worst way to approach it. – Antti Haapala Apr 6 '16 at 7:49
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In case the negative value is -1.0 or lower, it invokes undefined behavior since the integral part then cannot be represented by an unsigned number. Otherwise, (as in the case of -0.1), if it can be represented by an integer type, it is well-defined behavior. See the C11 standard, ISO 9899:2011:

6.3.1.4

When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined. 61)

And then there is a non-normative foot note explaining the above text:

61) The remaindering operation performed when a value of integer type is converted to unsigned type need not be performed when a value of real floating type is converted to unsigned type. Thus, the range of portable real floating values is (−1, Utype_MAX+1).

ISO/IEC 9899:1999 (C99) contains exactly the same text.

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    Is that the C standard? Actually I've noticed the question is multi-tagged. Have an upvote. – Bathsheba Apr 6 '16 at 6:57
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    @Bathsheba the question is labeled both C and C++ so either standard would be relevant. But it's a good question. – Mark Ransom Apr 6 '16 at 6:57
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    @Lundin but the question explicitly does -.1, which, truncated would be representable. – Antti Haapala Apr 6 '16 at 7:51
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    As Antti points out (unsigned)-.1 is within the range (−1, Utype_MAX+1), so this particular case is not undefined behaviour. We could re-write the answer pedantically, With the execption of negative values above -1.0, it invokes undefined behaviour. – Toby Speight Apr 6 '16 at 10:24
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    @TobySpeight Perhaps you mean "With the execption of negative values below/less than -1.0" – nalzok Apr 6 '16 at 16:37
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It is undefined behaviour in C99 if the floating point number is less than or equal to -1.0. If it's in the range (-1.0, 0.0), the resulting value will be 0.

From C99, §6.3.1.4, paragraph 1

When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined

Footnote 50 clarifies the behaviour for the (-1.0, 0.0) range.

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Your example, unsigned i = -.1; is well-defined by both C11 and C99, and the result is i == 0.

Quoted from N1570, 6.3.1.4 Real floating and integer:

  1. When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined.61)

61) The remaindering operation performed when a value of integer type is converted to unsigned type need not be performed when a value of real floating type is converted to unsigned type. Thus, the range of portable real floating values is (-1, Utype_MAX+1).

Quoted from N869, 6.3.1.4 Real floating and integer:

#1

When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined.43)

43)The remaindering operation performed when a value of integer type is converted to unsigned type need not be performed when a value of real floating type is converted to unsigned type. Thus, the range of portable real floating values is (-1, Utype_MAX+1).

However, as you can see from the quotations, trying to convert floating-point constants outside the range (-1, Utype_MAX+1) invokes undefined behaviour.

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