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I'm working on a client-server custom application (to be run on linux), and one of the frames I send include a timestamp (ie the time at which the frame is send).

In order to make my application reliable, I used gmtime to produce the time on the client. I'm in Belgium, so right now the hour of the client VM is 2 hours later than the UTC time (because of the summer hour).

In the server side, I first convert the recieved string to a time_t type. I do this to use the difftime function to see if the timestamp is not too old. Then, I generate a timestamp (in UTC time) again with gmtime, and I convert it to a time_t.

I compare then the two time_t to see the time difference.

I have got a problem with the conversion of the time at the server side. I use the same code as in the client, but the outputted gmtime is different...


Client Side : function to generate the timestamp, and export it to a string (time_str):

    std::string getTime()
    {
    time_t rawtime;
    struct tm * timeinfo;
    char buffer[80];

    time (&rawtime);              // Get time of the system
    timeinfo = gmtime(&rawtime);  // Convert it to UTC time

    strftime(buffer,80,"%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S",timeinfo);
    std::string time_str(buffer); // Cast it into a string
    cout<<"Time Stamp now (client) : "<<time_str<<endl;

    return time_str;
    }

And it produices this (at 9h33 local time) :

Time Stamp now : 06-04-2016 07:33:30


Server Side : fucntion to retrieve the timestamp, generate the newx time stamp, and compare them :

bool checkTimeStamp(std::string TimsStamp_str, double delay)
{
    cout<<"TimeStamp recieved: "<<TimsStamp_str<<endl;
    /* Construct tm from string */
    struct tm TimeStampRecu;
    strptime(TimsStamp_str.c_str(), "%d-%m-%Y %I:%M:%S", &TimeStampRecu);
    time_t t_old = mktime(&TimeStampRecu);

    /* Generate New TimeStamp */
    time_t rawtime;
    struct tm * timeinfo;
    time (&rawtime);  // Get time of the system
    timeinfo = gmtime(&rawtime);  // convert it to UTC time_t
    time_t t2 = mktime(timeinfo);  // Re-Cast it to timt_t struct
    /* Convert it into string (for output) */
        char buffer[80];
        strftime(buffer,80,"%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S",timeinfo);
        std::string time_str(buffer); // Cast it into a string
        cout<<"Time Stamp now (server) : "<<time_str<<endl;

    /* Comparison */
    double diffSecs = difftime(t2, t_old);
    cout<<diffSecs<<endl;
    bool isTimeStampOK;
    if (diffSecs < delay)
        isTimeStampOK = true;
    else
        isTimeStampOK = false;

return isTimeStampOK;
}

And it produces this (at 9h33 in Belgium) :

TimeStamp recieved : 06-04-2016 07:33:30

Time Stamp now (server) : 06-04-2016 08:33:31


Why is the Server Time (8h33) neither in localtime (9h33), neither in UTC time (7h33) ?

Have I made a mistake in its generation ? I don't understand where, because these are the exact same code as in the client side...

  • I forgot to mention that the two VMs are at the local time, running CentOS. – 3isenHeim Apr 6 '16 at 8:07
4

There's a couple of errors in your code, some your fault, some not. The biggest problem here is that the C <time.h> API is so poor, confusing, incomplete and error prone that errors like this are very nearly mandatory. More on that later.

The first problem is this line:

struct tm TimeStampRecu;

It creates an uninitialized tm and then passes that into strptime. strptime may not fill in all the fields of TimeStampRecu. You should zero-initialize TimeStampRecu like this:

struct tm TimeStampRecu{};

Next problem:

strptime(TimsStamp_str.c_str(), "%d-%m-%Y %I:%M:%S", &TimeStampRecu);

The 12-hour time denoted by %I is ambiguous without an AM/PM specifier. I suspect this is just a type-o as it is the only place you use it.

Next problem:

gmtime  time_t -> tm  UTC to UTC
mktime  tm -> time_t  local to UTC

That is, mtkime interprets the input tm according to the local time of the computer it is running on. What you need instead is:

timegm  tm -> time_t  UTC to UTC

Unfortunately timegm isn't standard C (or C++). Fortunately it probably exists anyway on your system.

With these changes, I think your code will run as expected.


If you are using C++11, there is a safer date/time library to do this here (free/open-source):

https://github.com/HowardHinnant/date

Here is your code translated to use this higher-level library:

std::string getTime()
{
    using namespace std::chrono;
    auto rawtime = time_point_cast<seconds>(system_clock::now());
    auto time_str = date::format("%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S", rawTime);
    std::cout<<"Time Stamp now (client) : "<<time_str<< '\n';

    return time_str;
}

bool checkTimeStamp(std::string TimsStamp_str, std::chrono::seconds delay)
{
    using namespace std::chrono;
    std::cout<<"TimeStamp recieved:       "<<TimsStamp_str<< '\n';
    /* Construct tm from string */
    std::istringstream in{TimsStamp_str};
    time_point<system_clock, seconds> t_old;
    date::parse(in, "%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S", t_old);

    /* Generate New TimeStamp */
    auto rawtime = time_point_cast<seconds>(system_clock::now());
    auto time_str = date::format("%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S", rawTime);
    in.str(time_str);
    time_point<system_clock, seconds> t2;
    date::parse(in, "%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S", t2);
    cout<<"Time Stamp now (server) : "<<time_str<<endl;

    /* Comparison */
    auto diffSecs = t2 - t_old;
    cout<<diffSecs.count()<<endl;
    bool isTimeStampOK;
    if (diffSecs < delay)
        isTimeStampOK = true;
    else
        isTimeStampOK = false;

    return isTimeStampOK;
}
1

A timestamp is an absolute value. It doesn't depend on timezones or DST. It represents the number of seconds since a fixed moment in the past. The value returned by time() is the same, no matter what the timezone of the server is.

Your code doesn't produce timestamps but dates formatted for human consumption.

I recommend you use timestamps internally and format them to dates readable by humans only in the UI. However, if you need to pass dates as strings between various components of your application, also put the timezone in them.

I would write your code like this (using only timestamps):

// The client side
time_t getTime()
{
    return time(NULL);
}


// The server side
bool checkTimeStamp(time_t clientTime, double delay)
{
    time_t now = time(NULL);

    return difftime(now, clientTime) < delay;
}

Update

If you have to use strings to communicate between client and server then all you have to do is to update the format string used to format the timestamps as dates (on the client) and parse the dates back to timestamps (on the server), to include the timezone you used to format the date.

This means add %Z into the format everywhere in your code. Use "%d-%m-%Y %H:%M:%S %Z". Btw, the code you posted now reads "%d-%m-%Y %I:%M:%S" in the call to strptime() and that will bring you another problem in the afternoon.

Remark

I always use "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %Z" because it is unambiguous and locale-independent. 06-04-2016 can be interpreted as April 6 or June 4, depending of the native language of the reader.

  • I must pass strings between the client and the server. And to convert the time_t into a string, I must pass by a struct tm, which is generated by localtime or gmtime. And that's where the errors come. – 3isenHeim Apr 6 '16 at 8:19
  • I updated the answer with the fix needed for your code (to continue using strings). – axiac Apr 6 '16 at 8:56
  • I took your changes into account, but the errors remains... The timestamp generated at the server is CEST, but the hour indicated in this timestamp isn't the CEST time... I got this : 2016-04-06 10:00:25 CEST (when ran at 11:00 CEST)... – 3isenHeim Apr 6 '16 at 9:04

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