14

Firstly is there a name for this expression ?

Javascript

var value = false || 0 || '' || !1 || 'string' || 'wont get this far';

value equals string (string) aka the fifth option

PHP

$value = false || 0 || '' || !1 || 'string' || 'wont get this far';

$value equals true (bool)

Am I right in thinking the correct way to achieve the same result as JavaScript is by nesting ternary operators? What is the best solution ?

  • 1
    It is true only..Test echo true; – Rayon Apr 6 '16 at 12:04
  • You might wanna check this out. – Blaze Sahlzen Apr 6 '16 at 12:04
  • 3
    In JS they’re called short-circuit evaluation – Sebastian Simon Apr 6 '16 at 12:05
  • 1
    <?php $value = false || 0 || '' || true || 'wont get this far'; echo $value===true?'true':$value; ?> – Rayon Apr 6 '16 at 12:06
  • @BlazeSahlzen thanks Knowing the correct terminology helps a lot. – TarranJones Apr 6 '16 at 12:10
19

The equivalent operator in PHP is ?:, which is the ternary operator without the middle part:

$value = false ?: 0 ?: '' ?: !1 ?: 'string' ?: 'wont get this far';

$a ?: $b is shorthand for $a ? $a : $b.

  • I think the question is not about ternary operator. But OP confusedly called ternary operator instead of short-circuit evaluation. – Bhojendra Rauniyar Apr 6 '16 at 12:22
  • 1
    In Javascript || returns one of its operands, not a boolean. The equivalent way to do that in PHP is ?:. Question answered. – deceze Apr 6 '16 at 12:24
  • Thanks for the explanation. I was assuming something else. – Bhojendra Rauniyar Apr 6 '16 at 12:25
  • OP did not get confused, OP merely suggested using a ternary to achieve the result. – TarranJones Apr 6 '16 at 12:26
  • Just realized.. and deleted my answer to support this answer. – Bhojendra Rauniyar Apr 6 '16 at 12:26
2

If You are using PHP 5.3 or higher see deceze's answer.

Other wise you could use nested regular ternary operators.

$value = ( false ? false : ( 0 ? 0 : ( '' ? '' : ( !1 ? !1 : ( 'string' ? 'string' : ( 'wont get this far' ? 'wont get this far' : null )))))); 

Wow thats ugly.

You could use an array of values instead;

$array = array(false,0,'',!1,'string','wont get this far'));

Now create a function which iterates over the array and returns the first true value.

function array_short_circuit_eval($vars = array()){
    foreach ($vars as $var)if($var)return $var;return null;
}

$value = array_short_circuit_eval($array);

echo $value; // string
  • 1
    $value = current(array_filter(array(false, 0, ...))) – I hope nobody needs to use this, but here it is... – deceze Apr 6 '16 at 13:46
1

This test false || 0 || '' || !1 || true || 'wont get this far' will return a boolean value. It will return true if any of the values is true, that's how the OR works. It's not a ternary expression, which applies the first valid value to the receiving variable.

It returns 1 to PHP because you didn't cast the expression as a boolean.

You could do this to make the expression return a boolean value instead of an integer into your PHP variable:

$value = (bool)(false || 0 || '' || !1 || true || 'wont get this far');`

The return will be true.

  • ".. || .. will return a boolean value...", "You could do this to make the expression return a boolean value..." – Which is it? Does || return a boolean or doesn't it? – deceze Apr 6 '16 at 12:25
  • It does return a boolean, but not directly into a variable, no in PHP. I don't get the two downvotes, but alrighty – Phiter Apr 6 '16 at 12:55
  • Wut? Either it returns a boolean or it doesn't. There's no difference whether you assign the return value into a variable or not. A value is a value. The boolean return value of || won't get any more boolean by casting it. – deceze Apr 6 '16 at 13:05

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