With extension methods, we can write handy LINQ operators which solve generic problems.

I want to hear which methods or overloads you are missing in the System.Linq namespace and how you implemented them.

Clean and elegant implementations, maybe using existing methods, are preferred.

  • Looks like most of the implementations you got so far choose reduced overhead rather than cleanliness and elegance, but to me personally that makes them more useful. – Roman Starkov Sep 5 '10 at 10:52
  • @Nappy, there's no one right/definitive answer to this question so it'd perhaps be better suited to being a community wiki question? =) – Rob Sep 5 '10 at 11:45
  • @Rob, I made it a community wiki question. – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 12:03
  • It would be really useful on this page to be able to collapse all the code blocks ☺ – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 13:06
  • 1
    This question should probably be locked, like stackoverflow.com/q/101268/344286 – Wayne Werner Jun 25 '15 at 16:41

43 Answers 43

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Append & Prepend

/// <summary>Adds a single element to the end of an IEnumerable.</summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of enumerable to return.</typeparam>
/// <returns>IEnumerable containing all the input elements, followed by the
/// specified additional element.</returns>
public static IEnumerable<T> Append<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T element)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    return concatIterator(element, source, false);
}

/// <summary>Adds a single element to the start of an IEnumerable.</summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of enumerable to return.</typeparam>
/// <returns>IEnumerable containing the specified additional element, followed by
/// all the input elements.</returns>
public static IEnumerable<T> Prepend<T>(this IEnumerable<T> tail, T head)
{
    if (tail == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("tail");
    return concatIterator(head, tail, true);
}

private static IEnumerable<T> concatIterator<T>(T extraElement,
    IEnumerable<T> source, bool insertAtStart)
{
    if (insertAtStart)
        yield return extraElement;
    foreach (var e in source)
        yield return e;
    if (!insertAtStart)
        yield return extraElement;
}
  • You could probably generalize even more by adding an enum for where to place the value, and then adding "between". I had the need to inject a value inbetween all values in a collection, sort of like String.Join type of functionality, only with generics. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Sep 5 '10 at 10:30
  • @Lasse V. Karlsen: I’ve posted an InsertBetween method as a separate answer. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 10:56
  • 7
    You can shorten the 'Append<T>` implementation to a one liner: return source.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(element, 1));. – Steven Sep 5 '10 at 10:59
  • 16
    Append and Prepend could also be implemented with AsEnumerable: head.AsEnumerable().Concat(source) / source.Concat(element.AsEnumerable()) – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 12:43
  • 2
    Good one +1 but I'd change it from T to params T[] so that you can append one or more items to the end. – Will Jun 17 '11 at 16:08

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the MoreLINQ project yet. It was started by Jon Skeet and has gained some developers along the way. From the project's page:

LINQ to Objects is missing a few desirable features.

This project will enhance LINQ to Objects with extra methods, in a manner which keeps to the spirit of LINQ.

Take a look at the Operators Overview wiki page for a list of implemented operators.

It is certainly a good way to learn from some clean and elegant source code.

  • 1
    +1. DistinctBy is very useful! – TrueWill Dec 29 '10 at 19:42

Each

Nothing for the purists, but darn it's useful!

 public static void Each<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> action)
 {
   foreach (var i in items)
      action(i);
 }
  • 3
    Parallel.ForEach would be doing the same and capable of parallel execution. Isnt it.. – abhishek Sep 5 '10 at 10:01
  • 1
    An overload taking a func instead of an action and yield return the results would be obvious too. – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 10:09
  • 24
    @Nappy: That one’s called Select and it’s built in. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 10:15
  • 1
    Its part of the System.Interactive.dll of the Reactive Extensions for .NET (Rx) called Do: "Invokes the action for its side-effects on each value in the sequence." – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 10:42
  • 2
    @Nappy: Do is not the equivalent of the method in the example; it would have to be followed by Run(), which also has an overload which takes an Action<T>. The latter would be the equivalent of the example. – Markus Johnsson Sep 5 '10 at 13:47

ToQueue & ToStack

/// <summary>Creates a <see cref="Queue&lt;T&gt;"/> from an enumerable
/// collection.</summary>
public static Queue<T> ToQueue<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    return new Queue<T>(source);
}

/// <summary>Creates a <see cref="Stack&lt;T&gt;"/> from an enumerable
/// collection.</summary>
public static Stack<T> ToStack<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    return new Stack<T>(source);
}
  • What's wrong with just var myQueue = new Queue<ObjectType>(myObj);? For only one-line, this isn't really a worthwhile extension... – cjk Sep 6 '10 at 7:35
  • 2
    @ck: You could apply the same logic to the built-in extension ToList() and these extensions also complement the ToArray() extension nicely. I prefer the fluent var myQueue = a.SelectMany(...).Where(...).OrderBy(...).ToQueue() to the more traditional syntax. – Martin Liversage Sep 6 '10 at 11:31
  • 1
    @Martin (&TimwI) - I can see the point when chaining together a large number of operators, it is much more tidy that way. +1. – cjk Sep 6 '10 at 11:36
  • 2
    @cjk the biggest advantage I see is the type parameter is not being specified. I wouldn't want to write <ObjectType> there if compiler can infer it. – nawfal Jul 10 '14 at 18:52

IsEmpty

public static bool IsEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return !source.Any();
}
  • 4
    This is built-in called Any. – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 20:10
  • 6
    +1 I'm not sure why this was down voted. To me source.IsEmpty() is clearer to read than !source.Any(). I always try to avoid using the ! operator where possible as in my opinion its easy to skip over it when quickly scanning code. – Bear Monkey Sep 5 '10 at 23:05
  • mfj196: It was downvoted before I fixed it. – Gabe Sep 6 '10 at 3:43
  • 2
    None is a more analogous to Any, than IsEmpty. – nawfal Jan 27 '14 at 9:54

In and NotIn

C# equivalents of two other well-known SQL constructs

/// <summary>
/// Determines if the source value is contained in the list of possible values.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the objects</typeparam>
/// <param name="value">The source value</param>
/// <param name="values">The list of possible values</param>
/// <returns>
///     <c>true</c> if the source value matches at least one of the possible values; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
/// </returns>
public static bool In<T>(this T value, params T[] values)
{
    if (values == null)
        return false;

    if (values.Contains<T>(value))
        return true;

    return false;
}

/// <summary>
/// Determines if the source value is contained in the list of possible values.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the objects</typeparam>
/// <param name="value">The source value</param>
/// <param name="values">The list of possible values</param>
/// <returns>
///     <c>true</c> if the source value matches at least one of the possible values; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
/// </returns>
public static bool In<T>(this T value, IEnumerable<T> values)
{
    if (values == null)
        return false;

    if (values.Contains<T>(value))
        return true;

    return false;
}

/// <summary>
/// Determines if the source value is not contained in the list of possible values.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the objects</typeparam>
/// <param name="value">The source value</param>
/// <param name="values">The list of possible values</param>
/// <returns>
///     <c>false</c> if the source value matches at least one of the possible values; otherwise, <c>true</c>.
/// </returns>
public static bool NotIn<T>(this T value, params T[] values)
{
    return In(value, values) == false;
}

/// <summary>
/// Determines if the source value is not contained in the list of possible values.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the objects</typeparam>
/// <param name="value">The source value</param>
/// <param name="values">The list of possible values</param>
/// <returns>
///     <c>false</c> if the source value matches at least one of the possible values; otherwise, <c>true</c>.
/// </returns>
public static bool NotIn<T>(this T value, IEnumerable<T> values)
{
    return In(value, values) == false;
}
  • Instead of if (values == null) return false; I think it should throw an exception. Silently swallowing error conditions is never good. – Timwi Sep 7 '10 at 2:40
  • It depends on how you look at it. The fact is an element is never contained in an empty list of values. – Johann Blais Sep 7 '10 at 6:50
  • One thing, helps with DRY but increases the call stack; the params array, being an array, is IEnumerable, so your params overload can simply call the IEnumerable overload. – KeithS Mar 30 '12 at 16:50
  • 1
    Just return values.Contains(value); is enough. – nawfal Jan 27 '14 at 9:57

AsIEnumerable

/// <summary>
/// Returns a sequence containing one element.
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> AsIEnumerable<T>(this T obj)
{
    yield return obj;
}  

Usage:

var nums = new[] {12, 20, 6};
var numsWith5Prepended = 5.AsIEnumerable().Concat(nums);   
  • Some kind of a linked list would definitely be better. yield return x will construct a whole new IEnumerable. So don't use it for concatenating many items. – Lasse Espeholt Sep 5 '10 at 11:05
  • 2
    I favor to write EnumerableEx.Return(5).Concat(nums) instead of bloating any objects IntelliSense. – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 11:15
  • 2
    I prefer using Append and Prepend for this. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 12:35
  • 13
    Purely for performance, I would suggest return new T[] { obj }; instead. That way, the compiler doesn't have to construct a whole state machine class just to yield one value. – Christian Hayter Sep 5 '10 at 16:46
  • 4
    I find this implementation dangerous. What would you expect from new[]{1, 2, 3, 4}.AsIEnumerable()? I would expect 1,2,3,4, not [1,2,3,4]. – larsmoa Jul 12 '11 at 9:37

JoinString

Basically the same as string.Join, but:

  • with the ability to use it on any collection, not just a collection of strings (calls ToString on every element)

  • with the ability to add a prefix and suffix to every string.

  • as an extension method. I find string.Join annoying because it is static, meaning that in a chain of operations it is lexically not in the correct order.


/// <summary>
/// Turns all elements in the enumerable to strings and joins them using the
/// specified string as the separator and the specified prefix and suffix for
/// each string.
/// <example>
///   <code>
///     var a = (new[] { "Paris", "London", "Tokyo" }).JoinString(", ", "[", "]");
///     // a contains "[Paris], [London], [Tokyo]"
///   </code>
/// </example>
/// </summary>
public static string JoinString<T>(this IEnumerable<T> values,
    string separator = null, string prefix = null, string suffix = null)
{
    if (values == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("values");

    using (var enumerator = values.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            return "";
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.Append(prefix).Append(enumerator.Current.ToString()).Append(suffix);
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            sb.Append(separator).Append(prefix)
              .Append(enumerator.Current.ToString()).Append(suffix);
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}
  • 1
    Very useful, although personally I would take out all the formatting code and just have the ability to join IEnumerable<string> with a separator. You can always project the data to IEnumerable<string> before calling this method. – Christian Hayter Sep 5 '10 at 11:11
  • @Timwi: A few minor points: You don't need the null checks before appending to the StringBuilder. You need to dispose the enumerator. You can get rid of the Append calls above the while loop and replace the loop with do-while. Finally, unless you want to avoid paying the cost of creating a StringBuilder, you don't need to treat the first element as a special-case: new StringBuilder().ToString() will return string.Empty. – Ani Sep 5 '10 at 14:46
  • 4
    String.Join in .NET 4 takes an IEnumerable<T>. – Ian Mercer Sep 5 '10 at 23:07
  • 1
    Does this do anything that we don't already have with the Aggregate operator? It's an unusual one to use but can definitely be used for joining lists of objects. – Kirk Broadhurst Sep 12 '10 at 13:52
  • 1
    @Kirk Broadhurst: Well, for one, Aggregate would be slower if you concatenate strings at each stage instead of using a StringBuilder. But for two, even if I wanted to use Aggregate for this, I would still wrap it into a JoinString method with this signature because it makes the code using it much clearer. And once I have that, I might as well write the method to be faster by using a StringBuilder. – Timwi Sep 12 '10 at 19:05

Order

/// <summary>Sorts the elements of a sequence in ascending order.</summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> Order<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return source.OrderBy(x => x);
}
  • 8
    I'd rather call this method 'Sort'. – Steven Sep 5 '10 at 11:02
  • 4
    @Steven: 'Sort' would cause ambiguity with List<T>.Sort() – Ani Sep 5 '10 at 12:20
  • 1
    Now it won't, because the C# compiler will always choose an instance method before an extension method. – Steven Sep 5 '10 at 13:07
  • 4
    @Steven: True, but regardless, it would still be ambiguous to the person reading the code. The difference is important because List<T>.Sort is in-place. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 13:19
  • 1
    Doesn't this require a GTC requiring T to implement IComparable? – KeithS Aug 11 '15 at 17:08

Shuffle

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    var random = new Random();
    return items.OrderBy(x => random.Next());
}

EDIT: It seems there are several issues with the above implementation. Here is an improved version based @LukeH's code and comments from @ck and @Strilanc.

private static Random _rand = new Random();
public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    var items = source == null ? new T[] { } : source.ToArray();
    var count = items.Length;
    while(count > 0)
    {
        int toReturn = _rand.Next(0, count);
        yield return items[toReturn];
        items[toReturn] = items[count - 1];
        count--;
    }
}
  • I would propose to rename this to either Randomize or Shuffle. – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 19:52
  • This might be better with a static Random object. – cjk Sep 6 '10 at 7:40
  • Rather than using Random, you could just order using new GUID values - items.OrderBy(x => Guid.NewGuid()). – Scott Mitchell Sep 10 '10 at 20:08
  • 1
    Your implementation is wrong. Worse than that, it is SUBTLY wrong. First, it has a hidden global dependency: the source of randomness (even worse, the source you chose will give the same shuffles if quickly called multiple times!). Second, the algorithm used is bad. Not only is it asymptotically slower than Fisher-Yates, it isn't uniform (elements assigned the same key stay in the same relative order). – Craig Gidney Sep 25 '10 at 5:37
  • 1
    I would probably add the random source as a parameter. This hast two advantages: You do not create multiple Random sources at startup, or at least it is the responsiveness of the developer to initialize them correctly, and second, if applied consistently its a good indicator, that the method returns different/random results each time. – Nappy Jul 12 '11 at 15:00

Loop

Here's a kinda cool one I just thought of. (If I just thought of it, maybe it's not that useful? But I thought of it because I have a use for it.) Loop through a sequence repeatedly to generate an infinite sequence. This accomplishes something kind of like what Enumerable.Range and Enumerable.Repeat give you, except it can be used for an arbitrary (unlike Range) sequence (unlike Repeat):

public static IEnumerable<T> Loop<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    while (true)
    {
        foreach (T item in source)
        {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
}

Usage:

var numbers = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };
var looped = numbers.Loop();

foreach (int x in looped.Take(10))
{
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Output:

1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1

Note: I suppose you could also accomplish this with something like:

var looped = Enumerable.Repeat(numbers, int.MaxValue).SelectMany(seq => seq);

...but I think Loop is clearer.

  • This implementation has the interesting property that it creates a new enumerator each time through, so it could give unexpected results. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 23:18
  • @Gabe: There's really no way to do it without creating a new enumerator each time. I mean, you could call Reset on the enumerator; but I'm pretty sure that's unsupported in like 90% of IEnumerator<T> implementations. So I guess you could get "unexpected" results, but only if you are expecting something that isn't feasible. In other words: for any ordered sequence (such as a T[], List<T>, Queue<T>, etc.), the order will be stable; for any unordered sequence, you shouldn't expect for it to be (in my opinion). – Dan Tao Sep 5 '10 at 23:43
  • @Gabe: An alternative, I suppose, would be to accept an optional bool parameter specifying whether the method should cache the order of the first enumeration and then loop over that. – Dan Tao Sep 5 '10 at 23:45
  • Dan: If you need the same results from the loop every time, you could just use x.Memoize().Loop(), but of course that means you need to have a Memoize function first. I agree that an optional bool would be fine, or a seperate method like LoopSame or LoopDeterministic. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 23:49

MinElement

Min only returns the minimum value returned by the specified expression, but not the original element that gave this minimum element.

/// <summary>Returns the first element from the input sequence for which the
/// value selector returns the smallest value.</summary>
public static T MinElement<T, TValue>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Func<T, TValue> valueSelector) where TValue : IComparable<TValue>
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (valueSelector == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("valueSelector");
    using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            throw new InvalidOperationException("source contains no elements.");
        T minElem = enumerator.Current;
        TValue minValue = valueSelector(minElem);
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            TValue value = valueSelector(enumerator.Current);
            if (value.CompareTo(minValue) < 0)
            {
                minValue = value;
                minElem = enumerator.Current;
            }
        }
        return minElem;
    }
}
  • 1
    It would be much preferable to either make valueSelector return an IComparable or change valueSelector to something like Func<T, T, bool> lessThan so that things like strings or decimals could be compared. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 22:22
  • @Gabe: Good idea! – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 23:19

IndexOf

/// <summary>
/// Returns the index of the first element in this <paramref name="source"/>
/// satisfying the specified <paramref name="condition"/>. If no such elements
/// are found, returns -1.
/// </summary>
public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> condition)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (condition == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("condition");
    int index = 0;
    foreach (var v in source)
    {
        if (condition(v))
            return index;
        index++;
    }
    return -1;
}
  • 5
    You should call this FindIndex to match the method on List<T> and Array that does the same thing. I would also consider checking to see if source is one of those things that already implements it and calling the native FindIndex function (although that won't make much of a difference performance-wise because you don't have an overload that takes a starting index). – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 21:42

Chunks

Returns chunks of a specific size. x.Chunks(2) of 1,2,3,4,5 will return two arrays with 1,2 and 3,4. x.Chunks(2,true) will return 1,2, 3,4 and 5.

public static IEnumerable<T[]> Chunks<T>(this IEnumerable<T> xs, int size, bool returnRest = false)
{
    var curr = new T[size];

    int i = 0;

    foreach (var x in xs)
    {
        if (i == size)
        {
            yield return curr;
            i = 0;
            curr = new T[size];
        }

        curr[i++] = x;
    }

    if (returnRest)
        yield return curr.Take(i).ToArray();
}
  • @Timwi Thanks for pointing that out. I usually use one which returns Lists, but I altered it to return arrays which I think most what. Correcting it now :) – Lasse Espeholt Sep 5 '10 at 10:57
  • It is fixed now :) – Lasse Espeholt Sep 5 '10 at 11:06
  • An alternative name would be Buffer – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 12:21
  • Why do you return an array? I would prefer IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 13:03
  • 2
    @Nappy: It is an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 13:10

ToHashSet

public static HashSet<T> ToHashSet<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    return new HashSet<T>(items);
}
  • I'd make this return an ISet<T> and call it ToSet. This hides the internal implementation better. – realbart Dec 7 '16 at 9:18

FirstOrDefault with a default value specified

/// <summary>
/// Returns the first element of a sequence, or a default value if the
/// sequence contains no elements.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the elements of
/// <paramref name="source"/>.</typeparam>
/// <param name="source">The <see cref="IEnumerable&lt;T&gt;"/> to return
/// the first element of.</param>
/// <param name="default">The default value to return if the sequence contains
/// no elements.</param>
/// <returns><paramref name="default"/> if <paramref name="source"/> is empty;
/// otherwise, the first element in <paramref name="source"/>.</returns>
public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T @default)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!e.MoveNext())
            return @default;
        return e.Current;
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Returns the first element of a sequence, or a default value if the sequence
/// contains no elements.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the elements of
/// <paramref name="source"/>.</typeparam>
/// <param name="source">The <see cref="IEnumerable&lt;T&gt;"/> to return
/// the first element of.</param>
/// <param name="predicate">A function to test each element for a
/// condition.</param>
/// <param name="default">The default value to return if the sequence contains
/// no elements.</param>
/// <returns><paramref name="default"/> if <paramref name="source"/> is empty
/// or if no element passes the test specified by <paramref name="predicate"/>;
/// otherwise, the first element in <paramref name="source"/> that passes
/// the test specified by <paramref name="predicate"/>.</returns>
public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
    Func<T, bool> predicate, T @default)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (predicate == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("predicate");
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (true)
        {
            if (!e.MoveNext())
                return @default;
            if (predicate(e.Current))
                return e.Current;
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    It just occured to me that this could be called FirstOr as in val = list.FirstOr(defaultVal) – Gabe Sep 26 '10 at 5:39
  • 1
    I'd prefer the name FirstOrFallback – Omer Raviv Sep 24 '11 at 11:40

InsertBetween

Inserts an element in between every pair of consecutive elements.

/// <summary>Inserts the specified item in between each element in the input
/// collection.</summary>
/// <param name="source">The input collection.</param>
/// <param name="extraElement">The element to insert between each consecutive
/// pair of elements in the input collection.</param>
/// <returns>A collection containing the original collection with the extra
/// element inserted. For example, new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.InsertBetween(0) returns
/// { 1, 0, 2, 0, 3 }.</returns>
public static IEnumerable<T> InsertBetween<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source, T extraElement)
{
    return source.SelectMany(val => new[] { extraElement, val }).Skip(1);
}
  • 1
    While this seems not too convoluted, I don't see a use case for this. Can you name some? Thanks. – Stéphane Gourichon Aug 11 '15 at 13:50

EmptyIfNull

This is a controversial one; I am sure many purists will object to an "instance method" on null succeeding.

/// <summary>
/// Returns an IEnumerable<T> as is, or an empty IEnumerable<T> if it is null
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> EmptyIfNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return source ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>();
}    

Usage:

foreach(var item in myEnumerable.EmptyIfNull())
{
  Console.WriteLine(item);   
}

Parse

This one involves a custom delegate (could've used an IParser<T> interface instead, but I went with a delegate as it was simpler), which is used to parse a sequence of strings to a sequence of values, skipping the elements where parsing fails.

public delegate bool TryParser<T>(string text, out T value);

public static IEnumerable<T> Parse<T>(this IEnumerable<string> source,
                                      TryParser<T> parser)
{
    source.ThrowIfNull("source");
    parser.ThrowIfNull("parser");

    foreach (string str in source)
    {
        T value;
        if (parser(str, out value))
        {
            yield return value;
        }
    }
}

Usage:

var strings = new[] { "1", "2", "H3llo", "4", "five", "6", "se7en" };
var numbers = strings.Parse<int>(int.TryParse);

foreach (int x in numbers)
{
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Output:

1
2
4
6

Naming's tricky for this one. I'm not sure whether Parse is the best option (it is simple, at least), or if something like ParseWhereValid would be better.

  • 1
    TryParse or ParseWhereValid would fit best imo. ;) – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 23:03
  • 2
    @Nappy: Yeah, I like TryParse; my only concern there is that someone might expect for it to return a bool and populate an out IEnumerable<T> argument instead (only returning true if every item was parsed). Maybe ParseWhereValid is best. – Dan Tao Sep 5 '10 at 23:47

ZipMerge

This is my version of Zip which works like a real zipper. It does not project two values into one but returns a combined IEnumerable. Overloads, skipping the right and/or left tail are possible.

public static IEnumerable<TSource> ZipMerge<TSource>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> first,
        IEnumerable<TSource> second)
{
    using (var secondEnumerator = second.GetEnumerator())
    {
        foreach (var item in first)
        {
            yield return item;

            if (secondEnumerator.MoveNext())
                yield return secondEnumerator.Current;
        }

        while (secondEnumerator.MoveNext())
            yield return secondEnumerator.Current;
    }
}
  • Useful, but should perhaps be called something else than the built-in Zip? (I know the parameters are enough to distinguish, but in the interest of readability of code...) – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 21:17
  • @Timwi Any suggestions for another name? Maybe ZipMerge? – Nappy Sep 5 '10 at 21:33
  • Yeah, sounds good. Edited. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 21:43
  • Wouldn't this skip the first element of second, or am I misreading the code? – Aistina Sep 6 '10 at 8:06
  • 1
    @realbart Thats not true: "If MoveNext passes the end of the collection, the enumerator is positioned after the last element in the collection and MoveNext returns false. When the enumerator is at this position, subsequent calls to MoveNext also return false until Reset is called." See msdn.microsoft.com/library/… – Nappy Dec 7 '16 at 11:08

RandomSample

Here's a simple function that's useful if you have a medium-large set of data (say, over 100 items) and you want to eyeball just a random sampling of it.

public static IEnumerable<T> RandomSample<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
                                             double percentage)
{
    source.ThrowIfNull("source");

    var r = new Random();
    return source.Where(x => (r.NextDouble() * 100.0) < percentage);
}

Usage:

List<DataPoint> data = GetData();

// Sample roughly 3% of the data
var sample = data.RandomSample(3.0);

// Verify results were correct for this sample
foreach (DataPoint point in sample)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} => {1}", point, DoCalculation(point));
}

Notes:

  1. Not really appropriate for tiny collections as the number of items returned is probabilistic (could easily return zero on a small sequence).
  2. Not really appropriate for huge collections or database queries as it involves enumerating over every item in the sequence.
  • Interesting, though it's generally more useful to ask for X random elements, rather than to say "give me approximately X% of the elements randomly". To do that, you should do something like this: source.OrderBy(r.NextDouble()).Take(x); – mattmc3 Sep 5 '10 at 22:28

AssertCount

Efficiently determines if an an IEnumerable<T> contains at least / exactly / at most a certain number of elements.

public enum CountAssertion
{
    AtLeast,
    Exact,
    AtMost
}

/// <summary>
/// Asserts that the number of items in a sequence matching a specified predicate satisfies a specified CountAssertion.
/// </summary>
public static bool AssertCount<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int countToAssert, CountAssertion assertion, Func<T, bool> predicate)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    if (predicate == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("predicate");

    return source.Where(predicate).AssertCount(countToAssert, assertion);
}

/// <summary>
/// Asserts that the number of elements in a sequence satisfies a specified CountAssertion.
/// </summary>
public static bool AssertCount<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int countToAssert, CountAssertion assertion)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    if (countToAssert < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("countToAssert");    

    switch (assertion)
    {
        case CountAssertion.AtLeast:
            return AssertCountAtLeast(source, GetFastCount(source), countToAssert);

        case CountAssertion.Exact:
            return AssertCountExact(source, GetFastCount(source), countToAssert);

        case CountAssertion.AtMost:
            return AssertCountAtMost(source, GetFastCount(source), countToAssert);

        default:
            throw new ArgumentException("Unknown CountAssertion.", "assertion");
    }

}

private static int? GetFastCount<T>(IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    var genericCollection = source as ICollection<T>;
    if (genericCollection != null)
        return genericCollection.Count;

    var collection = source as ICollection;
    if (collection != null)
        return collection.Count;

    return null;
}

private static bool AssertCountAtMost<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int? fastCount, int countToAssert)
{
    if (fastCount.HasValue)
        return fastCount.Value <= countToAssert;

    int countSoFar = 0;

    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (++countSoFar > countToAssert) return false;
    }

    return true;
}

private static bool AssertCountExact<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int? fastCount, int countToAssert)
{
    if (fastCount.HasValue)
        return fastCount.Value == countToAssert;

    int countSoFar = 0;

    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (++countSoFar > countToAssert) return false;
    }

    return countSoFar == countToAssert;
}

private static bool AssertCountAtLeast<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int? fastCount, int countToAssert)
{
    if (countToAssert == 0)
        return true;

    if (fastCount.HasValue)
        return fastCount.Value >= countToAssert;

    int countSoFar = 0;

    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (++countSoFar >= countToAssert) return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Usage:

var nums = new[] { 45, -4, 35, -12, 46, -98, 11 };
bool hasAtLeast3Positive = nums.AssertCount(3, CountAssertion.AtLeast, i => i > 0); //true
bool hasAtMost1Negative = nums.AssertCount(1, CountAssertion.AtMost, i => i < 0); //false
bool hasExactly2Negative = nums.AssertCount(2, CountAssertion.Exact, i => i < 0); //false
  • @Timwi: Unfortunately, if Enumerable.Count<T>() cannot determine the count that way, it will enumerate the entire sequence. This would defeat the point of this extension, which can quick-fail and quick-pass. – Ani Sep 5 '10 at 12:44
  • @Ani: OK, fair point. I missed that. – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 12:47
  • You should include something like CountAtMost so that I can change my action based on whether there are none, singlular, or plural elements without having to create 3 enumerators or count all the elements. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 21:57
  • 1
    BTW, I dislike the Assertion nomenclature because the word Assert to me implies that it throws an exception when its condition is false. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 22:44
  • 2
    Ani: I would probably have 3 different methods: CountIs, CountIsAtMost, and CountIsAtLeast. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 23:13

Window

Enumerates arrays ("windows") with the length of size containing the most current values.
{ 0, 1, 2, 3 } becomes to { [0, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3] }.

I am using this for example to draw a line graph by connecting two points.

public static IEnumerable<TSource[]> Window<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    return source.Window(2);
}

public static IEnumerable<TSource[]> Window<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int size)
{
    if (size <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("size");

    return source.Skip(size).WindowHelper(size, source.Take(size));
}

private static IEnumerable<TSource[]> WindowHelper<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int size, IEnumerable<TSource> init)
{
    Queue<TSource> q = new Queue<TSource>(init);

    yield return q.ToArray();

    foreach (var value in source)
    {
        q.Dequeue();
        q.Enqueue(value);
        yield return q.ToArray();
    }
}

One, Two, MoreThanOne, AtLeast, AnyAtAll

public static bool One<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    using (var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
        return enumerator.MoveNext() && !enumerator.MoveNext();
}

public static bool Two<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    using (var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
        return enumerator.MoveNext() && enumerator.MoveNext() && !enumerator.MoveNext();
}

public static bool MoreThanOne<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    return enumerable.Skip(1).Any();
}

public static bool AtLeast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, int count)
{
    using (var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
        for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
            if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
                return false;
    return true;
}

public static bool AnyAtAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    return enumerable != null && enumerable.Any();
}
  • Do not forget to wrap enumerator in a using statement. – Bear Monkey Sep 6 '10 at 12:20
  • I’ve taken the liberty to remove ToEnumerable because it does not appear to be related to the others, and it has already been posted in another answer anyway. – Timwi Sep 7 '10 at 2:52
  • Well Timwi if you'd examined the implementations of ToEnumerable more closely you'd find that they were not the same. My version takes an arbitrary set and turns into an enumerable. That's not the same function someone else posted. But sure... go ahead and take liberties. – noopman Sep 7 '10 at 5:11
  • 1
    +1 I like these methods. I have similar methods defined in my own utils library. IMO AnyAtAll would be easier to understand if you inverted it and called it IsNullOrEmpty. – Bear Monkey Sep 23 '10 at 8:27
  • 1
    I have a very similar "One" function in my own library of extension methods. It could also be useful to overload these to accept projections, the way Any, First etc do. – KeithS Aug 11 '15 at 17:16

SkipLast & TakeLast

/// <summary>
/// Enumerates the items of this collection, skipping the last
/// <paramref name="count"/> items. Note that the memory usage of this method
/// is proportional to <paramref name="count"/>, but the source collection is
/// only enumerated once, and in a lazy fashion. Also, enumerating the first
/// item will take longer than enumerating subsequent items.
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> SkipLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (count < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("count",
            "count cannot be negative.");
    if (count == 0)
        return source;
    return skipLastIterator(source, count);
}
private static IEnumerable<T> skipLastIterator<T>(IEnumerable<T> source,
    int count)
{
    var queue = new T[count];
    int headtail = 0; // tail while we're still collecting, both head & tail
                      // afterwards because the queue becomes completely full
    int collected = 0;

    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (collected < count)
        {
            queue[headtail] = item;
            headtail++;
            collected++;
        }
        else
        {
            if (headtail == count) headtail = 0;
            yield return queue[headtail];
            queue[headtail] = item;
            headtail++;
        }
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Returns a collection containing only the last <paramref name="count"/>
/// items of the input collection. This method enumerates the entire
/// collection to the end once before returning. Note also that the memory
/// usage of this method is proportional to <paramref name="count"/>.
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> TakeLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (count < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("count",
            "count cannot be negative.");
    if (count == 0)
        return new T[0];

    var queue = new Queue<T>(count + 1);
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (queue.Count == count)
            queue.Dequeue();
        queue.Enqueue(item);
    }
    return queue.AsEnumerable();
}
  • I believe your implementation of TakeLast could be used for SkipLast, with yield return queue.Dequeue();. – Mark Hurd May 24 '16 at 13:01

Duplicates

Used in conjunction with a method like Ani's AssertCount method (I use one called CountAtLeast), it becomes very easy to find elements in a sequence that appear more than once:

public static IEnumerable<T> Duplicates<T, TKey>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
    Func<T, TKey> keySelector = null, IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer = null)
{
    source.ThrowIfNull("source");
    keySelector = keySelector ?? new Func<T, TKey>(x => x);
    comparer = comparer ?? EqualityComparer<TKey>.Default;

    return source.GroupBy(keySelector, comparer)
        .Where(g => g.CountAtLeast(2))
        .SelectMany(g => g);
}
  • I think you could write g.CountAtLeast(2) in “built-in” LINQ as g.Skip(1).Any(). – Timwi Sep 5 '10 at 21:14
  • @Timwi: That's exactly how I wrote it ;) Several of the extension methods I use are really just very thin wrappers around functionality that could already be written concisely (another example: SkipNulls(), which is just Where(x => x != null)). I use them not because they do all that much extra but rather because I find they make code that much more readable (and wrapping a couple method calls into one where appropriate for code reuse is not so bad, anyway). – Dan Tao Sep 5 '10 at 22:07
  • Dan: SkipNulls<T>() is really just OfType<T>(). – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 23:15
  • @Gabe: You could make it OfType<T> or Where<T>; either way it's just a trivial wrapper. My point was just that the name SkipNulls makes it a bit more purposeful. – Dan Tao Sep 5 '10 at 23:41

WhereIf

Optional Where clause on IEnumerable and IQueryable. Avoids if statements when building predicates & lambdas for a query. Useful when you don't know at compile time whether a filter should apply.

public static IEnumerable<TSource> WhereIf<TSource>(
            this IEnumerable<TSource> source, bool condition,
            Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
{
    return condition ? source.Where(predicate) : source;
}

Useage:

var custs = Customers.WhereIf(someBool, x=>x.EyeColor=="Green");

LINQ WhereIf At ExtensionMethod.NET and borrowed from Andrew's blog.

  • Interesting. You could use this to link checkboxes to filters in an AJAX-ish search results page; mySearchResults.WhereIf(chkShowOnlyUnapproved.Checked, x=>!x.IsApproved) – KeithS Sep 7 '10 at 15:34

ToList and ToDictionary with Initial Capacity

ToList and ToDictionary overloads that expose the underlying collection classes' initial capacity. Occasionally useful when source length is known or bounded.

public static List<TSource> ToList<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
    int capacity)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    }
    var list = new List<TSource>(capacity);
    list.AddRange(source);
    return list;
}     

public static Dictionary<TKey, TSource> ToDictionary<TSource, TKey>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
    Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector, 
    int capacity,
    IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer = null)
{
    return source.ToDictionary<TSource, TKey, TSource>(
                  keySelector, x => x, capacity, comparer);
}

public static Dictionary<TKey, TElement> ToDictionary<TSource, TKey, TElement>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
    Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector, 
    Func<TSource, TElement> elementSelector,
    int capacity,
    IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer = null)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    }
    if (keySelector == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("keySelector");
    }
    if (elementSelector == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("elementSelector");
    }
    var dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey, TElement>(capacity, comparer);
    foreach (TSource local in source)
    {
        dictionary.Add(keySelector(local), elementSelector(local));
    }
    return dictionary;
}

CountUpTo

static int CountUpTo<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int maxCount)
{
    if (maxCount == 0)
        return 0;

    var genericCollection = source as ICollection<T>; 
    if (genericCollection != null) 
        return Math.Min(maxCount, genericCollection.Count);

    var collection = source as ICollection; 
    if (collection != null)
        return Math.Min(maxCount, collection.Count);

    int count = 0;
    foreach (T item in source)
        if (++count >= maxCount)
            break;
    return count;
}
  • 1
    This is semantically the same as collection.Take(maxCount).Count(), right? – Timwi Sep 22 '11 at 14:08
  • @Timwi: Yes, it's the same. – Gabe Sep 22 '11 at 15:40

Coalesce

public static T Coalesce<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items) {
   return items.Where(x => x != null && !x.Equals(default(T))).FirstOrDefault();
   // return items.OfType<T>().FirstOrDefault(); // Gabe's take
}
  • Since you're actually using it, allow me to simplify it for you. – Gabe Sep 5 '10 at 23:20
  • No thanks. As your version only works with object types (not DateTime, etc.) and your usage of OfType<T> isn't typical since most people know it as a casting method and not a non-null filter, and since it doesn't add anything in terms of readability or performance, I'll stick with my original. – mattmc3 Sep 6 '10 at 0:00
  • But OfType<T> does work with DateTime, no?. Also, I do think of OfType<T> as a non-null filtering method, how else would it work? Maybe its just me and Gabe... – Bear Monkey Sep 6 '10 at 0:36
  • OfType works with value types, sure. Though Gabe's usage changed the Coalesce method so that it doesn't work the way I want it to for value types. As far as OfType goes, I think of its usage more for heterogeneous or polymorphic collections where you want to filter by type (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb360913.aspx). The MSDN article doesn't even mention filtering out nulls. – mattmc3 Sep 6 '10 at 0:57
  • Made classic mistake when converting from VB to C#... Nothing is not equivalent to null... had to revise C# implementation. – mattmc3 Sep 6 '10 at 1:48

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