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I'm studying Haskell using the book "Haskell Programming from First Principles", and towards the end of Chapter 4, "Basic datatypes", I've come across something that confused me. The book mentions a function length and says that it works on Listss. Everything is fine with that, but when I try this length function with various Tuples, what I see confused me:

First, let's see the type of length:

:t length
length :: Foldable t => t a -> Int

OK, so I read above as "takes a Foldable, which I think as a list for convenience, and returns an Int, that is the number of elements in the list." Hence my first confusion: Why does the the following work at all:

length (1, 1)
1

Because to me, it seems like I've just passed a tuple with two elements to length, and it returned 1. Is tuple a list? Is tuple Foldable? And of course, why 1?

Now I go one step further:

length (1, 1, 1)

<interactive>:6:1:
    No instance for (Foldable ((,,) t0 t1))
      arising from a use of ‘length’
    In the expression: length (1, 1, 1)
    In an equation for ‘it’: it = length (1, 1, 1)

<interactive>:6:9:
    No instance for (Num t0) arising from the literal ‘1’
    The type variable ‘t0’ is ambiguous
    Note: there are several potential instances:
      instance Num Integer -- Defined in ‘GHC.Num’
      instance Num Double -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
      instance Num Float -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
      ...plus two others
    In the expression: 1
    In the first argument of ‘length’, namely ‘(1, 1, 1)’
    In the expression: length (1, 1, 1)

<interactive>:6:12:
    No instance for (Num t1) arising from the literal ‘1’
    The type variable ‘t1’ is ambiguous
    Note: there are several potential instances:
      instance Num Integer -- Defined in ‘GHC.Num’
      instance Num Double -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
      instance Num Float -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
      ...plus two others
    In the expression: 1
    In the first argument of ‘length’, namely ‘(1, 1, 1)’
    In the expression: length (1, 1, 1)

Another try:

length (1::Int, 1::Int, 1::Int)

<interactive>:7:1:
    No instance for (Foldable ((,,) Int Int))
      arising from a use of ‘length’
    In the expression: length (1 :: Int, 1 :: Int, 1 :: Int)
    In an equation for ‘it’: it = length (1 :: Int, 1 :: Int, 1 :: Int)

But the following works:

length (1::Int, 1::Int)
1

Is there any good explanation for the behavior I'm observing above? Am I misreading the type of length? Or is there something else going on behind the scenes?

4

2 Answers 2

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You have encountered a Haskell cause célèbre that has sparked much discussion and gnashing of teeth.

Basically, for the purposes of Foldable (the typeclass that provides length), 2-tuples are not considered a container of two elements, but a container of one element accompanied by some context.

You can extract a list of elements of type a from any Foldable a. Notice that for 2-tuples the type variable of the Foldable is that of the second element of the tuple, and it can be different from the type of the first element.

If you had a ('c',2) :: (Char,Int) tuple, it would be no mystery that you couldn't extract two Ints in that case! But when the types are equal it becomes confusing.

As for why length (1::Int, 1::Int, 1::Int) fails, 3-tuples don't have a Foldable instance defined, but perhaps they should have one, for consistency. 3-tuples would also have length 1.

By the way, the Identity functor, that could be considered a kind of 1-tuple, is also Foldable and of course has length 1 as well.

Should the Foldable instance for tuples exist at all? I think the underlying philosophy in favor of yes is one of, shall we call it, "plenitude". If a type can be made an instance of a typeclass in a well defined, lawful way, it should have that instance. Even if it doesn't seem very useful and, in some cases, may be confusing.

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  • 2
    I'm trying to interpret what you wrote by also examining the fact that minimum (1, 2) returns 2, minimum (2,1) returns 1, and minimum ('c', 2) returns 2. Apr 6, 2016 at 20:11
  • 3
    @EmreSevinç Foldable is basically the "convertible into list" typeclass. All its operations could be performed with the same results on the list obtained from the Foldable value using toList. They are defined directly in Foldable for efficiency reasons (for example, if a container keeps track of its own length, that is more efficient that traversing the full length of the list). Also, if a container has more than one type parameter (like 2-tuples do, and maps) for the purposes of Foldable its "element type" will always be its last parameter.
    – danidiaz
    Apr 6, 2016 at 20:38
  • 1
    @EmreSevinç do you mean “why does toList only use the second element” (I think I've explained that in the linked post), or “why does length operate on the list generated by the Foldable instance” – that is basically a matter of necessity, to keep the semantics consistent. For instance, you might want to compute the average of all numbers in some container. If you do this as sum xs / length xs, but the sum only goes over one element yet the length is two, you get a complete garbage result. (Admittedly, that would be a rather naïve thing to do, anyway.) Apr 6, 2016 at 22:33
  • 1
    Yeah. I think it would have been better to never give (a,) a Foldable instance, Apr 7, 2016 at 11:21
  • 2
    "If a type can be made an instance of a typeclass in a well defined, lawful way, it should have that instance. Even if it doesn't seem very useful and, in some cases, may be confusing." I completely disagree with this. What makes you think this is a good idea?
    – user76284
    Nov 21, 2017 at 1:48
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I like danidiaz's answer because it provides the high-level intuition about how the Foldable instance for tuples works and what it intuitively means. However it seems there is still some confusion about the mechanics of it; so in this answer I will focus on the "behind-the-scenes" bits. The full text of the Foldable instance in question is available online and looks like this:

instance Foldable ((,) a) where
    foldMap f (_, y) = f y
    foldr f z (_, y) = f y z

You can already see from this instance that the first part of each tuple is completely ignored in all Foldable methods. However, to complete the picture, we need to look at the definitions for minimum and length. Since this instance does not include definitions for minimum and length, we should look at the default definitions for these. The class declaration for Foldable looks like this (with irrelevant bits elided):

class Foldable t where
    length :: t a -> Int
    length = foldl' (\c _ -> c+1) 0

    foldl' :: (b -> a -> b) -> b -> t a -> b
    foldl' f z0 xs = foldr f' id xs z0
      where f' x k z = k $! f z x

    minimum :: forall a . Ord a => t a -> a
    minimum = fromMaybe (error "minimum: empty structure") .
       getMin . foldMap (Min #. (Just :: a -> Maybe a))

So now, let's expand these definitions and see where they get us.

length (a, b)
= { definition of length }
foldl' (\c _ -> c+1) 0 (a, b)
= { definition of foldl' }
foldr (\x k z -> k $! (\c _ -> c+1) z x) id (a, b) 0
= { definition of foldr }
(\x k z -> k $! (\c _ -> c+1) z x) b id 0
= { beta reduction }
id $! (\c _ -> c+1) 0 b
= { id $! e = e }
(\c _ -> c+1) 0 b
= { beta reduction }
1

Note that the conclusion holds regardless of what we plug in for a and b. Now let's do minimum. For our purposes, we will replace (#.) with (.) -- the only difference is efficiency, which we don't care about for this particular line of reasoning.

minimum (a, b)
= { definition of minimum }
( fromMaybe (error "minimum: empty structure")
. getMin
. foldMap (Min . Just)
) (a, b)
= { definition of (.) }
( fromMaybe (error "minimum: empty structure")
. getMin
) (foldMap (Min . Just) (a, b))
= { definition of foldMap }
( fromMaybe (error "minimum: empty structure")
. getMin
) ((Min . Just) b)
= { definition of (.) }
fromMaybe (error "minimum: empty structure")
(getMin (Min (Just b)))
= { definition of getMin }
fromMaybe (error "minimum: empty structure") (Just b)
= { definition of fromMaybe }
b
0

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